Connect with us

Technology

Startup develops edible ketchup packets made from SEAWEED for condiments

Published

on

startup develops edible ketchup packets made from seaweed for condiments

Humans produce more than 300 million tons of plastic a year, half of which is single-use and 

About 26.8 million tons goes into landfills but more than eight million tons finds its way into the ocean.

Now a UK startup is doing its part to break our global plastic addiction with an eco-friendly casing that can be used for ketchup, mustard, soy sauce, or any condiment.

Made from seaweed, Ooho sachets from Notpla are biodegradable, compostable and even edible.

Seaweed farmed in northern France is dried out and ground into powder before undergoing a patented process that turns it into a clear goopy substance which can be molded like plastic.

Seaweed grows faster than paper or starch, and doesn’t compete for land or fresh water.

Scroll down for video 

Made from seaweed extract, Notpla's Ooho sachets can be used in place of ketchup, soy sauce or salad dressing packets. The packaging is biodegradable, compostable and even edible

Made from seaweed extract, Notpla’s Ooho sachets can be used in place of ketchup, soy sauce or salad dressing packets. The packaging is biodegradable, compostable and even edible

‘Seaweed is a fantastic base material due to its sustainability credentials and fast growth,’ COO Lise Honsinger told Packaging Europe. ‘By using a natural material as an input, it makes us a carbon recycler, rather than plastics which obviously come from non-renewable oil.’

Notpla co-founder Rodrigo Garcia Gonzalez says one strain of seaweed the company uses grows up three feet a day.

‘Can you imagine something growing that fast?’ he tells Business Insider. ‘You don’t need fertilizer, you don’t need to put water on it, and it’s a resource that we have been using for a long time.’

The sachets come in a variety of sizes, from a third of an ounce to two ounces.

The 'Ooho' name comes from the sound people make when they see it for the first time, Garcia says

The ‘Ooho’ name comes from the sound people make when they see it for the first time, Garcia says

The ‘Ooho’ name comes from the sound people make when they see it for the first time, Garcia says. 

The company has partnered with Just Eat, a British food delivery app, on a trial program using Ooho packets for Hellmann’s ketchup, barbecue sauce and other condiments.

According to Unilever,  Hellman’s parent company, over 90 percent of customers felt the sachets were just as easy to use as regular plastic packets and would like to see more takeaway sauces in Ooho packaging.   

‘This trial is a great example of collaboration driving game-changing innovation,’ said Unilever’s Hazel Detsiny. ‘We’re creating a new and exciting experience for Just Eat customers who can enjoy the same great tasting Hellmann’s – but with zero plastic waste.’        

Notpla has already developed Oohos for beverages: In lieu of a bottle cap or pull tab, you just bite off the corner and drink. 

Glenlivet tested Oohos filled with whiskey and Oohos filled with water were given out at the London Marathon.

In early March, a vending machine that dispenses Oohos filled with an Lucozade energy drink was installed at a gym in London.  

A vending machine dispenses one-ounce Ooho capsules filled with Lucozade sports drink.

A vending machine dispenses one-ounce Ooho capsules filled with Lucozade sports drink.

After raising more than $1 million in a crowdfunding campaign last year, Notpla raised more than $5 million in venture capital earlier this year. 

Next, it’s taking a bite out of another environmental menace – carryout containers – with a line of disposable takeout boxes, coming to market later this year.

Most cardboard takeaway containers are treated with polylactic acid, or PLA, which can take centuries to decompose.

The Notpla Box is treated with seaweed and plant extracts to make it waterproof and greaseproof.

Treated with seaweed and plant extracts to make it waterproof and greaseproof, the Notpla carryout box biodegrades in three to six weeks

Treated with seaweed and plant extracts to make it waterproof and greaseproof, the Notpla carryout box biodegrades in three to six weeks

It completely breaks down in just three to six weeks.

‘What we’ve done is replace the PLA with our natural material, so even if it does enter nature, it will degrade naturally like a piece of fruit or a vegetable,’ Juno Wilson, Notpla’s projects and business manager, told Business Insider. 

How much plastic winds up in the ocean every year?

Of the 30 billion plastic bottles used by UK households each year, only 57 percent is recycled.  

Around 700,000 a day end up as litter.

And 95 percent of plastic packaging – is thrown out after a single use, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. 

More than 8.8 million tons of plastic finds its way into the ocean each year, equivalent to a truckload every minute. 

At current rates, that will increase to four truckloads per minute in 2050, by which time plastic will outnumber marine life in the world’s waters.  

It is estimated that about eight million metric tons of plastic find their way into the world's oceans every year

More than 8.8 million tons of plastic finds its way into the ocean each year 

More than half of the plastic waste in the ocean comes from just five countries: China, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam and Sri Lanka.  

China alone is responsible for 2.4 million tons of plastic in the ocean, nearly 28 percent of the global total.

The United States contributes just 77,000 tons, or less than one percent.

Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Technology

SpaceX launches reusable Falcon 9 rocket booster for SEVENTH time

Published

on

By

spacex launches reusable falcon 9 rocket booster for seventh time

SpaceX has reused a Falcon 9 rocket for a record breaking seventh time during its most recent mission to put another 60 Starlink satellites into orbit.

It comes as the Elon Musk-owned space launch firm is preparing for the first high altitude test flight of its mammoth Starship prototype spaceship – dubbed SN8. 

Launched from Cape Canaveral in Florida at 02:13 GMT this morning, the Falcon 9 flight was the seventh time that particular first stage booster had been used.

This beat the previous record for a booster of six trips and helps Musk in his mission to bring down the cost of launching payloads from the Earth by reusing equipment.

The Falcon 9 launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in the early hours of this morning carrying the 16th batch of Starlink satellites

The Falcon 9 launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in the early hours of this morning carrying the 16th batch of Starlink satellites

The Falcon 9 launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida in the early hours of this morning carrying the 16th batch of Starlink satellites

SpaceX was able to recover the booster from the Atlantic Ocean using a drone flight – which means it may be able to fly for an eighth time in the future.

The booster wasn’t the only part of the Falcon 9 to be reused during this flight – that brings the total of small Starlink internet satellites up to nearly 1,000.

The fairing cover used to protect the payload had also been used before – half on one other trip and another on two different trips before this one, SpaceX confirmed.

Every time SpaceX is able to reuse a component it reduces the cost of getting material into low Earth orbit compared to using parts for the first time.

Research by the Center for Strategic and International Studies found that the average cost of putting 1kg of material in orbit on a SpaceX launch is $2,600.

In comparison, the average cost to put a 1kg object in orbit from a Russian Soyuz was $17,900 and the United Launch Alliance Delta E came in at $177,900 per kg. 

Musk is working to bring that cost down even further with each element of the Falcon 9 they are able to reuse.

Part of that drive to reuse is pushing development of the massive Starship two-stage-to-orbit fully-reusable heavy lift vehicle.

It has been under development since 2012 and is designed to bring the cost of each launch downs significantly by being fully reusable.

A single Falcon 9 launch costs about $51 million if it is reusing components that have flown before – Musk hopes to get the Spaceship launch in at $2 million per trip.

That reality could soon be a step closer as the firm is preparing to send up the latest prototype Starship SN8 on a high altitude test flight.

Musk tweeted that it has already undergone a successful static fire test and that in the next week or so it would fly up to about nine miles into the sky.

This beat the previous record for a booster of six trips and helps Musk in his mission to bring down the cost of launching payloads from the Earth by reusing equipment

This beat the previous record for a booster of six trips and helps Musk in his mission to bring down the cost of launching payloads from the Earth by reusing equipment

 This beat the previous record for a booster of six trips and helps Musk in his mission to bring down the cost of launching payloads from the Earth by reusing equipment

Space X performed the third over all static fire on Starship SN8 Thursday November 12 at its Boca Chica facility in Texas. The next stage is a high altitude test

Space X performed the third over all static fire on Starship SN8 Thursday November 12 at its Boca Chica facility in Texas. The next stage is a high altitude test

Space X performed the third over all static fire on Starship SN8 Thursday November 12 at its Boca Chica facility in Texas. The next stage is a high altitude test

The edge of space is agreed by NASA and others to be 50 miles above sea level but to go into orbit you need to get to at least 100 miles above sea level.

If this latest flight test – that will see the triple Raptor engine fire and lift the 400ft spaceship into the air – is successful, then further, higher tests will likely follow.

November 30 has been provisionally set aside as the date of the high altitude test that will see the spaceship reach the highest it has ever flown.

Musk tweeted: ‘Good Starship SN8 static fire! Aiming for first 15km / ~50k ft altitude flight next week. Goals are to test 3 engine ascent, body flaps, transition from main to header tanks & landing flip.’

The landing is one of the most important aspects – as it needs to be fully reusable to achieve the goals and price per flight set out by the SpaceX team. 

WHAT IS ELON MUSK’S ‘BFR’?

The BFR (Big F***ing Rocket), now known as Starship, will complete all missions and is smaller than the ones Musk announced in 2016.

The SpaceX CEO said the rocket would take its first trip to the red planet in 2022, carrying only cargo, followed by a manned mission in 2024 and claimed other SpaceX’s products would be ‘cannibalised’ to pay for it.

The rocket would be partially reusable and capable of flight directly from Earth to Mars.

Once built, Musk believes the rocket could be used for travel on Earth – saying that passengers would be able to get anywhere in under an hour.

44DFD4DC00000578 4933944 image a 77 1506734013996

44DFD4DC00000578 4933944 image a 77 1506734013996

<!—->Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Technology

Environment: microfibre filters in washing machines needed to protect marine life, charity says 

Published

on

By

environment microfibre filters in washing machines needed to protect marine life charity says

Washing machines for sale should be legally required to have special filters to catch plastic microfibres released from clothing, an environmental charity has said.

The Marine Conservation Society’s ‘Stop Ocean Threads‘ campaign is calling for the UK Government to write the use of the filters into law by the year 2024.

However, the charity is also lobbying washing machine makers directly in the hope of speedier action — and is asking the public to help by tweeting their message. 

Research conducted by YouGov on the charity’s behalf found that more than four-fifths of adults surveyed supported the introduction of such legislative measures.

Meanwhile, 26 per cent said that they would be quite willing to pay an extra £50 for their next washing machine if such came with a filter to catch plastic microfibres. 

Less than five millimetres in length, microfibers are produced across every step of the garment fabrication process — and released when clothes are machine washed. 

In September, a study reported that washing machines are dumping around 165,000 tons of synthetic fibres into the ocean each year — and other 175,000 tons on land.

Scroll down for video 

Washing machines for sale should be legally required to have special filters to catch plastic microfibres released from clothing, an environmental charity has said

Washing machines for sale should be legally required to have special filters to catch plastic microfibres released from clothing, an environmental charity has said

Washing machines for sale should be legally required to have special filters to catch plastic microfibres released from clothing, an environmental charity has said

‘Our research has found that the public is largely supportive of our call for legislation, and consumers are willing to pay a little more to reduce the flow of microplastics into the ocean,’ said the Marine Conservation Society’s Laura Foster.

‘It’s fantastic to see the support our petition has received so far, but now we need the public to show their support and join our action to engage with manufacturers directly,’ Dr Foster added.

‘If we can show manufacturers that the public wants these filters fitted as soon as possible, we hope to speed up the legislative process and get filters fitted in the near future.’

A petition launched by the charity has to date been signed by more than 12,000 people — and can be found on the Marine Conservation Society website.

Members of the public are also being encouraged to tweet their support of the campaign’s goals directly at washing machine manufacturers.

‘Hey @Miele_GB @BekoUK @Hoover_UK @BoschUK @SamsungUK @WhirlpoolCorp,’ the suggested message begins.

‘We want washing machine manufacturers to commit to fitting microfibre filters before 2024. Will you do this and help us #StopOceanThreads? Please retweet and share far and wide.’ 

A petition launched by the charity has to date been signed by more than 12,000 people — and can be found on the Marine Conservation Society website . Members of the public are also being encouraged to tweet their support of the campaign's goals, as pictured

A petition launched by the charity has to date been signed by more than 12,000 people — and can be found on the Marine Conservation Society website . Members of the public are also being encouraged to tweet their support of the campaign's goals, as pictured

A petition launched by the charity has to date been signed by more than 12,000 people — and can be found on the Marine Conservation Society website . Members of the public are also being encouraged to tweet their support of the campaign’s goals, as pictured

Synthetics fabrics — such as polyester and nylon — are the most commonly used fibres in the textile industry.

They account for more than 60 per cent of the materials used to produce clothes worldwide.

Around 15 per cent of all plastic is used to make synthetic fibres, chiefly for clothing.

URBAN FLOODING IS FLUSHING MICROPLASTICS INTO THE OCEANS FASTER THAN THOUGHT

Urban flooding is causing microplastics to be flushed into our oceans even faster than thought, according to scientists looking at pollution in rivers.

Waterways in Greater Manchester are now so heavily contaminated by microplastics that particles are found in every sample – including even the smallest streams.

This pollution is a major contributor to contamination in the oceans, researchers found as part of the first detailed catchment-wide study anywhere in the world.

This debris – including microbeads and microfibres – are toxic to ecosystems.

Scientists tested 40 sites around Manchester and found every waterway contained these small toxic particles.

Microplastics are very small pieces of plastic debris including microbeads, microfibres and plastic fragments.

It has long been known they enter river systems from multiple sources including industrial effluent, storm water drains and domestic wastewater.

However, although around 90 per cent of microplastic contamination in the oceans is thought to originate from land, not much is known about their movements.

Most rivers examined had around 517,000 plastic particles per square metre, according to researchers from the University of Manchester who carried out the detailed study.

Following a period of major flooding, the researchers re-sampled at all of the sites.

They found levels of contamination had fallen at the majority of them, and the flooding had removed about 70 per cent of the microplastics stored on the river beds.

This demonstrates that flood events can transfer large quantities of microplastics from urban river to the oceans.

<!—->Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Technology

Narcissists classed as key workers thrived because it made them feel like ‘heroes’

Published

on

By

narcissists classed as key workers thrived because it made them feel like heroes

Narcissistic people who were classed as key workers during the pandemic got a thrill out of being dubbed ‘heroes’ when going about their job.

A new study confirms what many exasperated friends and family may have suspected when loved ones were bragging about their own importance during the coronavirus pandemic – that they were getting a kick out of the situation. 

The public praise for essential workers – including shop workers, delivery drivers and teachers – acted as a ‘trigger’ for narcissists, researchers say.  

A study has formally confirmed what exasperated friends and family suspected when loved ones bragged about their importance during the coronavirus pandemic - narcissists got a thrill out of being dubbed a 'hero' (stock)

A study has formally confirmed what exasperated friends and family suspected when loved ones bragged about their importance during the coronavirus pandemic - narcissists got a thrill out of being dubbed a 'hero' (stock)

A study has formally confirmed what exasperated friends and family suspected when loved ones bragged about their importance during the coronavirus pandemic – narcissists got a thrill out of being dubbed a ‘hero’ (stock)

Amy Brunell, co-author of the study and associate professor of psychology at Ohio State University, said: ‘The word “hero” is a trigger for narcissists.

‘Having their work elevated to hero status provides them with an opportunity to shine in front of others and feel even better about themselves.’

The study was based on online surveys of 312 people who considered themselves to be essential workers. 

The most common job position listed was working in a convenience/grocery store.

Narcissists who bragged about their work on social media revealed the posting made them feel even better about themselves (stock)

Narcissists who bragged about their work on social media revealed the posting made them feel even better about themselves (stock)

Narcissists who bragged about their work on social media revealed the posting made them feel even better about themselves (stock)

The questionnaires determined their personality type and also their feelings about their role.  

It found that people identified as ‘communal narcissists’ or ‘agentic narcissists’ were more likely to discuss their work on social media. 

Communal narcissists believe they are better at contributing to a bigger goal than other people, whereas agentic narcissists are the stereotypical show-offs that seek out and hog the limelight  

‘[Communal narcissists] think they are the best at being helpful and caring for others. The pandemic gave them a chance to stand out,’ Dr Brunell said. 

Argentic narcissists got their thrills from the ‘hero status’ they were given which ‘gave them a way to feel admired and distinct from others’, the researchers say. 

Narcissists who bragged about their work on social media revealed the posting made them feel even better about themselves.

As a result, they were more likely to agree with statements like ‘right now, I greatly enrich others’ lives’ and ‘Right now, I feel like I am a special person.’

The findings are available in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

Narcissistic people are more likely to be viewed positively by their bosses due to high energy levels 

Calling someone a narcissist is generally insulting, but a new study suggests the label could be desirable for employers.

Researchers at Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China have linked narcissistic personality traits to higher energy levels in the work place and were more well regarded by their supervisors.  

People with more narcissistic personality traits also tended to take leadership roles more readily than other workers, whether asked or not, according to the researchers, led by Huazhong University’s Kong Zhou.

‘We argue that narcissistic employees usually have stronger internal motivations to release the potential energy stored in their bodies as to prove they are better than other employees,’ the team writes.

‘Hence, we predict that narcissistic employees may be more energized to exhibit taking-charge behavior in the workplace.’

<!—->Advertisement

This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2020 DiazHub.