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Steve Forbes slams magazine editor over op-ed on Trump officials

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steve forbes slams magazine editor over op ed on trump officials

Steve Forbes, the head of Forbes Media, slapped down the editor of his magazine for warning companies that hire officials who worked in the Trump administration would be blacklisted. 

Steve Forbes said he valued the diversity of opinion at his company while taking a swipe at social media platforms that removed President Trump after last week’s rioting at the United States Capitol.

‘Unlike Twitter, media giants, and Big Tech companies, we believe in diversity of opinion,’ Steve Forbes told Fox News on Wednesday.

Steve Forbes was invited on to the program to comment about an op-ed published by one of his employees, Randall Lane, the chief content officer for Forbes magazine.

Steve Forbes was alluding to the decision last week by Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and other media platforms to remove President Trump from their services in the wake of his mob’s ransacking of the Capitol on January 6. 

Steve Forbes, the head of Forbes Media

Steve Forbes, the head of Forbes Media

Randall Lane, chief content officer for Forbes Magazine

Randall Lane, chief content officer for Forbes Magazine

Steve Forbes (left), the head of Forbes Media, said on Wednesday that he didn’t agree with an op-ed written by Forbes magazine’s chief content officer, Randall Lane (right), warning American companies against hiring officials who worked in the Trump administration

Pictured: Kayleigh McEnany, White House press secretary, speaks during a news briefing, in the White House on January 7, 2021. An op ed published by Forbes has warned companies from hiring McEnany and other members of the Trump administration

Pictured: Kayleigh McEnany, White House press secretary, speaks during a news briefing, in the White House on January 7, 2021. An op ed published by Forbes has warned companies from hiring McEnany and other members of the Trump administration

Pictured: Kayleigh McEnany, White House press secretary, speaks during a news briefing, in the White House on January 7, 2021. An op ed published by Forbes has warned companies from hiring McEnany and other members of the Trump administration

Sarah Huckabee Sanders

Sarah Huckabee Sanders

Kellyanne Conway

Kellyanne Conway

Left: Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Right: Kellyanne Conway. Both have worked for the Trump administration as spokeswomen, with Sanders working as the White House press secretary from 2017 to 2019

In an op-ed published the day after a Trump-incited mob stormed the Capitol, Lane wrote: ‘As American democracy rebounds, we need to return to a standard of truth when it comes to how the government communicates with the governed.

‘The easiest way to do that, from where I sit, is to create repercussions for those who don’t follow the civic norms.

‘Let it be known to the business world: Hire any of Trump’s fellow fabulists above, and Forbes will assume that everything your company or firm talks about is a lie.’

Steve Forbes told Fox News on Wednesday that while he did not agree with the op-ed, he cited the piece as an example of how his company embraces a diversity of viewpoints while calling on other firms to follow his example.

‘This is reminiscent of what we had in the 1950s during the McCarthy era,’ Steve Forbes told Fox News.

‘People were denied work because of their political beliefs…

‘We’re not going to have blacklists and the like.

‘People can express opinions. Unlike other organizations, we do have diverse opinions at Forbes and we value those diverse opinions and I think that shows strength, not weakness.’

Steve Forbes told Fox News that both he and Lane are opposed to cancel culture, which he said was a ‘cancer.’

Steve Forbes, who twice ran for the Republican nomination for president in 1996 and 2000, also urged Americans to ‘get together and move forward.’

The op-ed by Lane generated strong reaction this week.

Who was Senator Joseph McCarthy and what was McCarthyism?

Senator Joseph McCarthy, pictured, in 1954, held 36 days of televised hearings in an effort to uncover a secret communist plot to undermine the United States

Senator Joseph McCarthy, pictured, in 1954, held 36 days of televised hearings in an effort to uncover a secret communist plot to undermine the United States

Senator Joseph McCarthy, pictured, in 1954, held 36 days of televised hearings in an effort to uncover a secret communist plot to undermine the United States

Senator Joseph McCarthy started an anti-communist witch hunt after he delivered a Lincoln Day address in Wheeling, West Virginia on February 9, 1950. 

McCarthy had been relatively anonymous during his period in the Senate following his election in 1946, until he claimed there was a secret plot by communists to overthrow US democracy. 

During his speech, McCarthy claimed he had a list of communists who had infiltrated the State Department with the aim of undermining US foreign policy. 

The Senate established a special committee to investigate McCarthy’s claims, but these were soon dismissed as ‘a fraud and a hoax’. 

Yet, when Kim Il-Sung launched his surprise attack on Seoul in June 1950, public opinion in the United States had shifted. 

Communist North Korean forces backed by Soviet fighter pilots surprised the US government. 

It was feared at the time that Korea was the first act in an attempted global communist takeover. 

This paranoia was fuelled by the conviction of State Department worker Alger Hiss, who was accused of passing secrets to a communist spy ring in the late 1940s.

In 1950, he was convicted of perjury, but this was enough to launch a second investigation. 

In 1952, McCarthy was re-elected to the Senate and was appointed chairman of the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, where he probed allegations of espionage and subversion. 

It culminated into televised hearings over the course of 36 days in 1954. The lack of evidence behind any of his claims destroyed the Wisconsin senator’s political career and resulted in him receiving an official rebuke.  

In total, some 2,000 US government employees lost their jobs as a result of the hearings and his investigations.  

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It warned companies specifically against hiring the likes of Kayleigh McEnany, Kellyanne Conway, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, Sean Spicer, Stephanie Grisham and other high-profile individuals who worked for the Trump administration.

‘From Day One at the Trump White House, up has been down, yes has been no, failure has been success. Sean Spicer set the tone with the inauguration crowd size – the worst kind of whopper, as it demanded that people disbelieve their own eyes.’

‘The next day, Kellyanne Conway defended Spicer’s lie with a new term, “alternative facts”,’ Lane writes. 

Grisham, Spicer and Sanders have all worked as press secretaries under President Trump, while McEnany is the current incumbent of the position, staunchly defending the President in the final months of his presidency.

Independent Women's Forum analyst Kelsey Bolar (pictured speaking on Fox & Friends on Tuesday night) slammed the Forbes article published on January 7, calling it 'dangerous cancel culture', 'that is not going to unite the nation'

Independent Women's Forum analyst Kelsey Bolar (pictured speaking on Fox & Friends on Tuesday night) slammed the Forbes article published on January 7, calling it 'dangerous cancel culture', 'that is not going to unite the nation'

Independent Women’s Forum analyst Kelsey Bolar (pictured speaking on Fox & Friends on Tuesday night) slammed the Forbes article published on January 7, calling it ‘dangerous cancel culture’, ‘that is not going to unite the nation’

Conway worked as a Senior Counselor to President Trump from 2017 to 2020, often acting as a spokesperson for the administration.

In the final paragraph of the article, Lane wrote that the proposal ‘isn’t cancel culture, which is a societal blight.

‘Nor is this politically motivated, as Forbes’ pro-entrepreneur, pro-growth worldview has generally placed it in the right-of-center camp over the past century — this standard needs to apply to liars from either party. 

‘It’s just a realization that, as Daniel Patrick Moynihan famously said, in a thriving democracy, everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but not their own facts. Our national reset starts there.’ 

Independent Women’s Forum analyst Kelsey Bolar slammed the article, calling it ‘dangerous cancel culture’, ‘that is not going to unite the nation.’

Speaking to Fox News’ Fox & Friends talk show, Bolar said the article was ‘just the latest example of cancel culture and the great purge that we’re seeing come from the left and never-Trump Republicans.’

President-elect Joe Biden, Bolar said, was elected to the presidency on the idea of bringing unity and a sense of normalcy to the United States.

But this ‘dangerous cancel culture’ will prevent that from happening, she claimed. 

‘This dangerous cancel culture, which wants to ban any American who had the audacity to support President Trump or work in his administration from being able to do something as basic as have a new job,’ she said. 

‘The media, big tech and corporate America are all in on this. It is a very dangerous and concerning trend. It is not going to unite the country, it is going to divide us,’ Bolar said, before going on to claim the existence of a ‘huge double standard.’

‘This is coming from the same media that peddled the idea that the 2016 election was hijacked from the Russians,’ she said.

‘Nancy Pelosi tweeted that the 2016 election was hijacked and faced no sort of repercussions. The media partook in peddling that narrative. They don’t hold themselves accountable but yet they want to turn around and tell us that anyone who worked in the Trump administration does not deserve to have a job.’ 

The Trump administration has faced a backlash after thousands of MAGA supporters stormed the US Capitol building last week on January 6.

President Trump is now facing the prospect of becoming the only commander in chief in history to be impeached twice, with Democrats having introduced an article of impeachment on Monday for his role in inciting the mob that attacked the Capitol.

Democrats intend to hold an impeachment vote on Wednesday, to formally charge Mr. Trump with inciting violence against the country.

MAGA protesters were told by Trump and his allies to head to Capitol Hill where lawmakers were scheduled to confirm Biden's presidential victory

MAGA protesters were told by Trump and his allies to head to Capitol Hill where lawmakers were scheduled to confirm Biden's presidential victory

MAGA protesters were told by Trump and his allies to head to Capitol Hill where lawmakers were scheduled to confirm Biden’s presidential victory 

The Trump campaign held a ‘Save America’ rally on the Ellipse outside the White House on January 6, prior to the riots, which saw the president speak for over an hour to a large crowd of MAGA supporters.

The president and those close to him have faced accusations from both sides of the aisle of inciting the riot, with some going as far as calling it a coup attempt. 

After this, we’re going to walk down, and I’ll be there with you. We’re going to walk down. We’re going to walk down any one you want, but I think right here. We’re going to walk down to the Capitol, and we’re going to cheer on our brave senators, and congressmen and women,’ the president said during the event.

‘We’re probably not going to be cheering so much for some of them, because you’ll never take back our country with weakness. You have to show strength, and you have to be strong.’ 

Later, a violent mob stormed the Capitol, breaking through police barricades and smashing windows to enter the building.

Lawmakers were forced to go into hiding for several hours as Capitol police grappled to take back control while the mob defecated in the Senate and House, invaded Nancy Pelosi’s office and looted items potentially including state secrets.   

The mob overran the Capitol Police shortly after Trump urged them to 'fight' on his behalf

The mob overran the Capitol Police shortly after Trump urged them to 'fight' on his behalf

The mob overran the Capitol Police shortly after Trump urged them to ‘fight’ on his behalf

A supporter of US President Donald Trump holds a Confederate flag outside the Senate Chamber during the raid of the Capitol

A supporter of US President Donald Trump holds a Confederate flag outside the Senate Chamber during the raid of the Capitol

A supporter of US President Donald Trump holds a Confederate flag outside the Senate Chamber during the raid of the Capitol

It wasn't until Thursday night, more than 24 hours after his supporters trashed the Capitol building and sent lawmakers scurrying for safety, that Trump released a recorded statement calling for 'healing and reconciliation'

It wasn't until Thursday night, more than 24 hours after his supporters trashed the Capitol building and sent lawmakers scurrying for safety, that Trump released a recorded statement calling for 'healing and reconciliation'

It wasn’t until Thursday night, more than 24 hours after his supporters trashed the Capitol building and sent lawmakers scurrying for safety, that Trump released a recorded statement calling for ‘healing and reconciliation’

One Trump supporter, US Air Force veteran Ashli Babbitt, was shot dead by Capitol Police as she tried to climb through a window. 

Three other Trump supporters died after ‘medical emergencies’ related to the breach and Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick died Thursday from injuries sustained in the attack after the thug allegedly hit him over the head with a fire extinguisher. 

Dozens of people have already been arrested and prosecutors across the U.S. have vowed to bring to justice those who stormed the Capitol, sending lawmakers into hiding as they began their work to affirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

The group included white nationalists, neo-Nazis and QAnon conspiracy theorists, coming from states as far-flung as Arizona and Oregon, while photographs from the riot have shown people wearing clothes with a range of antisemitic messages.

The debate around cancel culture and free speech intensified following the riots when right-wing social media site Parler disappeared from the web and vanished from the Apple and Google app stores after tech giants cut ties with the platform.

Hailed by Donald Trump supporters as a conservative-friendly alternative to Twitter, Parler is seen as a magnet for the far right and was accused by Apple, Google and Amazon of continuing to allow messages inciting violence after Wednesday's attack at the Capitol

Hailed by Donald Trump supporters as a conservative-friendly alternative to Twitter, Parler is seen as a magnet for the far right and was accused by Apple, Google and Amazon of continuing to allow messages inciting violence after Wednesday's attack at the Capitol

Hailed by Donald Trump supporters as a conservative-friendly alternative to Twitter, Parler is seen as a magnet for the far right and was accused by Apple, Google and Amazon of continuing to allow messages inciting violence after Wednesday’s attack at the Capitol 

Parler CEO John Matze warned in his final post before the 3am deadline that 'we will likely be down longer than expected' as tech firms distance themselves from the site.

Parler CEO John Matze warned in his final post before the 3am deadline that 'we will likely be down longer than expected' as tech firms distance themselves from the site.

Parler CEO John Matze warned in his final post before the 3am deadline that ‘we will likely be down longer than expected’ as tech firms distance themselves from the site.

Parler went offline shortly after Amazon booted the platform off its web hosting service, effectively shutting it down until it can find a new hosting partner. 

Hailed by Donald Trump supporters as a conservative-friendly alternative to Twitter – which permanently suspended the president last Friday – the site is seen as a magnet for the far right and was accused by Apple, Google and Amazon of continuing to allow messages inciting violence after Wednesday’s riot. 

Parler, which Apple claims was used by some of the rioters to help plan the insurrection, was the most-downloaded app in the Apple store on Friday before both Apple and Google cut off its access to their app stores. 

CEO John Matze warned in his final post that ‘we will likely be down longer than expected’ as tech firms distance themselves from the ‘free speech’ site.

‘Amazon’s, Google’s and Apple’s statements to the press about dropping our access has caused most of our other vendors to drop their support for us as well,’ said Matze, who has labeled the Big Tech moves to isolate his app ‘absolutely disgusting’. 

‘Parler is my final stand on the Internet. I won’t be making an account on any social. Parler is my home,’ he said. He later issued a press release condemning violence and arguing the app has ‘worked hard’ to ‘remove prohibited content’. 

Following Parler’s removal the president’s eldest son retweeted a post which read: ‘The internet was a hell of a lot safer before @Twitter, @Apple, @Google, and @Facebook started protecting us from it’. Don Jr. added: ‘This times 1000.’ 

Parler is bankrolled by prominent conservative donor Rebekah Mercer 

Parler, which styles itself as a ‘free speech-driven’ space, is bankrolled by hedge-fund investor Robert Mercer’s daughter Rebekah, the Wall Street Journal reported in November. 

Rebekah has described her as a co-founder of the site with CEO John Matze.  

‘John and I started Parler to provide a neutral platform for free speech, as our founders intended, and also to create a social media environment that would protect data privacy,’ she wrote in a post on the site this fall.

‘The ever increasing tyranny and hubris of our tech overlords demands that someone lead the fight against data mining, and for the protection of free speech online,’ she added.

Hedge-fund investor Robert Mercer is pictured with his daughter Rebekah in 2017

Hedge-fund investor Robert Mercer is pictured with his daughter Rebekah in 2017

Hedge-fund investor Robert Mercer is pictured with his daughter Rebekah in 2017

Matze replied to the post: ‘Bekah is a great friend, an American patriot, and most importantly committed to the Parler vision of neutrality and data privacy. We are grateful for her support since 2018, and her early faith in the founders has enabled us to reach these heights. #transparency.’  

After WSJ reported Rebekah’s links to Parler she issued a statement saying that her multi-millionaire father Robert was not an investor in the site – while sources close to the clan claimed that the investment was a family affair. 

Rebekah referred to herself as a co-founder of Parler in a post on the site in November

Rebekah referred to herself as a co-founder of Parler in a post on the site in November

Rebekah referred to herself as a co-founder of Parler in a post on the site in November

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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