With a long exposure the ISS cuts a fine line across the night sky (@Liam_Ball92)
With a long exposure the ISS cuts a fine line across the night sky (@Liam_Ball92)

One photographer is making the most of being stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic by pointing his camera skyward and capturing the International Space Station (ISS) as it passes overhead.

The space station is positioned 250 miles above the Earth and orbits the planet every 90 minutes. If it’s a particularly clear night then you’re able to see it yourself in the sky – it looks like a fast-moving star.

Thanks to the long exposure, photographers are managing to make the ISS appears like a line of light cutting through the night sky.

Often just caught with a smartphone and a tripod rather than a fancy camera, these photographers have shared their efforts on Twitter.

IN SPACE - MAY 29: In this handout provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), back dropped by planet Earth the International Space Station (ISS) is seen from NASA space shuttle Endeavour after the station and shuttle began their post-undocking relative separation May 29, 2011 in space. After 20 years, 25 missions and more than 115 million miles in space, NASA space shuttle Endeavour is on the last leg of its final flight to the International Space Station before being retired and donated to the California Science Center in Los Angeles. Capt. Mark E. Kelly, U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' (D-AZ) husband, has lead mission STS-134 as it delivered the Express Logistics Carrier-3 (ELC-3) and the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-2) to the International Space Station. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)
The ISS is above the UK at the moment (Nasa)

If you want to try and spot the ISS in the night sky, you’ve got plenty of time. It will be passing over the UK between 6.30pm and 10.30pm each night up until April 4.

EDITORIAL USE ONLY Residents and school children from Star, in Pembrokeshire, use the Google Pixel 4 to capture photos of the stars and the Milky Way, Wales. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Wednesday October 23, 2019. A study from Google Pixel 4 reveals that those living in Wales are least likely in the UK to look up to the night sky. The research also reveals that nearly two-thirds of Britons didn???t know that our Galaxy is called the Milky Way, and 17% of people want to take better photos of the night sky. The Google Pixel 4 launched earlier this month with new enhanced Night Sight mode, which can capture photos of the Milky Way in just one tap. Photo credit should read: Adam Gasson/PA Wire
Google’s latest phone even has an astrophotography mode (Adam Gasson/PA Wire)

Some of the newer phones have special ‘Night Mode’ camera settings for shooting in low-light. The Google Pixel 4 even has a special ‘astrophotography’ feature designed specifically for the night sky. All you do is point the camera skywards (on a clear night) and the mode will kick in to give you the best possible shot of the cosmos.

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So, if you want to try and alleviate the boredom of self-isolation for a couple of evenings, maybe head outside and try and get some shots of the night sky.

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