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Border Force patrol intercepts dinghy carrying 22 migrants in the English Channel

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A Border Force patrol has intercepted a small dinghy carrying 22 suspected migrants in the English channel.

The group were picked up at around 7am this morning off the coast of Dover, and will now be medically checked and questioned by immigration officials in the coastal town in Kent.

No information regarding ages, gender, or nationalities of the migrants has been released.

It comes after two incidents on Friday where Border Force intercepted a total of 20 male migrants off the UK coast.

A Border Force patrol has intercepted a small dinghy carrying 22 suspected migrants off the coast of Dover. (Pictured: Border Force patrol boat tows a migrant ship back to port this morning)

A Border Force patrol has intercepted a small dinghy carrying 22 suspected migrants off the coast of Dover. (Pictured: Border Force patrol boat tows a migrant ship back to port this morning)

A Border Force patrol has intercepted a small dinghy carrying 22 suspected migrants off the coast of Dover. (Pictured: Border Force patrol boat tows a migrant ship back to port this morning)

It comes after 20 men were picked up while trying to cross the English Channel on Friday. The men were processed by authorities and given blankets

It comes after 20 men were picked up while trying to cross the English Channel on Friday. The men were processed by authorities and given blankets

It comes after 20 men were picked up while trying to cross the English Channel on Friday. The men were processed by authorities and given blankets

Friday’s migrants were stopped by the Coastguard at Dover harbour after two dinghies were spotted.

They were processed by authorities and given blankets after making the trip as temperatures plunged to below 4C on Friday morning.

Around 1,500 asylum seekers have made it into Britain since January, with record numbers risking their lives to get to the UK by small boats.

They are typically picked up by Border Force officers after making it on to British waters – usually off the Kent coast – and brought into Dover to be questioned.

Millions of pounds has been spent by the Home Office in an effort to stop the crossings, but they continued to surge and reached record numbers in the summer.

In August, 336 migrants made it into Britain – including 86 in one day – while a woman drowned after falling overboard during a crossing. Her body was found on Dutch waters weeks after the incident.

The group of men were stopped by the Coastguard at Dover Harbour after they were spotted in a dinghy on Friday

The group of men were stopped by the Coastguard at Dover Harbour after they were spotted in a dinghy on Friday

The group of men were stopped by the Coastguard at Dover Harbour after they were spotted in a dinghy on Friday

The men picked up on Friday were also in a dingy as they attempted the perilous journey across one of the world's busiest shipping lanes

The men picked up on Friday were also in a dingy as they attempted the perilous journey across one of the world's busiest shipping lanes

The men picked up on Friday were also in a dingy as they attempted the perilous journey across one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes 

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NSW driver jailed over pedestrian’s death

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An “upset and distracted” woman whose dangerous driving caused the death of a 78-year-old pedestrian near Wollongong has been jailed for at least a year.

Amelia Rae Fennell, now 25, contended that Barbara Jones stepped out into traffic without taking any proper precautions and would have died no matter what her manner of driving had been.

But the Wollongong District Court jury disagreed and in August found Fennell guilty of driving in a manner dangerous causing death in September 2017 at Oak Flats.

Judge Andrew Haesler on Monday jailed her for three years with a non-parole period of one year.

“Just before the collision Mrs Jones had stepped onto the roadway from a pedestrian refuge just south of a roundabout,” he said.

“There was no marked pedestrian crossing but it was a well signposted high pedestrian area.”

Fennell was driving her car at an estimated speed of 58 km/h as she exited the roundabout, while the posted limit was 40 km/h.

She told police she didn’t see Mrs Jones but felt an impact. She stopped and gave immediate assistance.

The judge referred to evidence that Fennell was not fully recovered from a leg infection, but had returned to work that morning but left after a dispute with her boss.

“She was upset, distracted, still unwell and not thinking clearly,” the judge said.

“Instead of exercising the proper care expected of a driver she drove recklessly and dangerously through the roundabout without thought for the consequences.

“She did so in an area clearly marked to alert drivers to the danger posed by pedestrians and at a speed well above what the area and time of day demanded.”

Victim impact statements told of the “immeasurable pain and loss her violent, tragic and undignified death has caused them all”, he said.

The judge accepted Fennell was remorseful and had family responsibilities, but concluded full time imprisonment was the appropriate sentence.

“An innocent woman out shopping was killed as a result of Fennell’s seriously criminal driving.”

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The brave and tragic stories of our underage Anzacs

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During the First World War, thousands of boys across Australia and New Zealand – some as young as 13 – lied about their age or forged a parent’s signature and left to fight on the other side of the world.

More than 100 years on, journalist and author Paul Byrnes has written a book featuring the untold stories of 40 underage Anzac boys.

In the video above: Paul Byrnes on The Daily Edition

Some died while they were still too young to enlist, others survived the war and went on to live full lives.

One of those who survived was New Zealander Lesley Shaw. He was our youngest Anzac, enlisting at the age of just 13 years and 8 months.

He survived the battlefields and lived an adventurous life after the war.

Byrnes’ book The Lost Boys is available now through Affirm Press.

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Vic gangland lawyer ‘died over $500 row’

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A man allegedly murdered gangland lawyer Joe Acquaro after being accused of setting fire to his Melbourne cafe in a dispute over $500.

Vincenzo Crupi, 70, is charged with murdering the 54-year-old at Brunswick East on March 15, 2016.

Documents released by Melbourne Magistrates Court show Crupi was accused of setting fire to Mr Acquaro’s Gelobar cafe nearly two months earlier over a dispute about $500.

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