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Criminal inquiry call for death in custody

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Individual police need to be held criminally accountable for the death in custody of Yorta Yorta woman Tanya Day, her children will argue to the Victorian Coroners Court.

They also want coroner Caitlin English to acknowledge that systemic racism and unconscious bias were central to Ms Day’s death.

The calls come in a written submission to the inquest into Ms Day’s death almost two years ago.

Final oral submissions will be heard in court on Monday.

The 55-year-old grandmother fell and suffered a head injury while in a regional Victorian police cell after being arrested for drunkenness on a train on December 5, 2017. She died two weeks later.

“We know that our mum died in custody because police targeted her for being drunk in public and then failed to properly care for her after they locked her up,” her family said in a statement on Monday.

“We know that racism was a cause of our mum’s death. Both individual police officers and Victoria Police as a whole must be held to account. Without accountability, more Aboriginal people will die in custody.”

The Day family is arguing for three main things:

* For individual police officers to be held accountable through a criminal investigation

* For Victoria Police, V/Line and Ambulance Victoria to be held to account through a finding that systemic racism was a cause of Ms Day’s death

* For a recommendation police stop investigating other police.

Ms Day was woken from sleep as she travelled on a train on her way to Melbourne and arrested for being drunk in a public place, then hitting her head in a police cell.

Her family argues that on the evidence heard so far, it is “possible” police have committed offences which the coroner should refer to the Department of Public Prosecutions.

The submission also argues systemic racism and unconscious bias played a “central role” in Ms Day’s death, because public drunkenness laws were more likely to be applied to her as an Aboriginal woman.

They have also stressed the significance of the coroner’s findings for future generations.

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ROBERT HARDMAN on the solemn dignity of Remembrance Sunday 

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She was a princess when she laid her first wreath at the Cenotaph. 

As a veteran herself – and, indeed, the only head of state in the world today who served in the Second World War – the Queen knows this ceremony better than anyone.

Yet, for her, it remains as poignant as ever. Hence, the tear gently making its way down the royal cheek yesterday as she led the nation in tribute to all those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

Her Majesty is pictured above shedding a tear. As a veteran herself ¿ and, indeed, the only head of state in the world today who served in the Second World War ¿ the Queen knows this ceremony better than anyone

Her Majesty is pictured above shedding a tear. As a veteran herself ¿ and, indeed, the only head of state in the world today who served in the Second World War ¿ the Queen knows this ceremony better than anyone

Her Majesty is pictured above shedding a tear. As a veteran herself – and, indeed, the only head of state in the world today who served in the Second World War – the Queen knows this ceremony better than anyone

Flanked by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, the Queen looked on from a balcony as the Prince of Wales placed her wreath on the Cenotaph before laying his own tribute. 

Stretching into the distance, veterans and families from every strand of the Armed Forces lined up to do the same.

This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the Cenotaph itself but of the two-minute silence at 11am. Both were introduced by George V in 1919, a mere seven years before the Queen’s birth.

Flanked by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, the Queen looked on from a balcony as the Prince of Wales placed her wreath on the Cenotaph before laying his own tribute. The Duchess of Cambridge is pictured above

Flanked by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, the Queen looked on from a balcony as the Prince of Wales placed her wreath on the Cenotaph before laying his own tribute. The Duchess of Cambridge is pictured above

Flanked by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, the Queen looked on from a balcony as the Prince of Wales placed her wreath on the Cenotaph before laying his own tribute. The Duchess of Cambridge is pictured above

Very little has changed since. Not once did the Queen – wearing her traditional five-stemmed poppy – even glance at the order of service for this ceremony, knowing every word of every hymn and prayer.

Her only other words, according to lip-reading spectators, concerned the weather. 

‘Isn’t it freezing?’ the Duchess of Cornwall observed just before the start. ‘Quite bracing,’ added the Duchess of Cambridge. ‘It’s cold enough,’ the Queen concurred.

On the adjacent balcony, the Duchess of Sussex joined the Countess of Wessex and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence. 

Down below, all the Queen’s children, along with her grandsons, the Dukes of Cambridge and Sussex, and her cousin, the Duke of Kent, stood smartly to attention in their uniforms. The wreath of the Duke of Edinburgh, now aged 98 and retired from public life, was laid by his equerry.

Less well-trained, however, were the political contingent. The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, set off to lay his wreath too early, ran into an ear-splitting military command to ‘Stand At – Ease!’ and hastily shuffled back to his position before having a second go.

Four balconies along from the monarch’s position, Mr Johnson’s girlfriend, Carrie Symonds, appeared in a respectful blue coat and hat, standing alongside Lord Bilimoria, patron of the UK Zoroastrian Parsi community, and other faith representatives.

Twice during the half-hour service, however, she disappeared inside for several minutes. Downing Street declined to comment.

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, set off to lay his wreath too early, ran into an ear-splitting military command to ¿Stand At ¿ Ease!¿ and hastily shuffled back to his position before having a second go

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, set off to lay his wreath too early, ran into an ear-splitting military command to ¿Stand At ¿ Ease!¿ and hastily shuffled back to his position before having a second go

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, set off to lay his wreath too early, ran into an ear-splitting military command to ‘Stand At – Ease!’ and hastily shuffled back to his position before having a second go

The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, had certainly made a greater effort with his appearance than on previous occasions. Last year’s much-criticised red tie and anorak had been replaced by a dark blue tie and smart overcoat (which, unlike the Prime Minister’s, was also done up). 

Mr Corbyn’s lips were certainly moving during both the Lord’s Prayer and the national anthem. 

¿Isn¿t it freezing?¿ the Duchess of Cornwall observed just before the start. ¿Quite bracing,¿ added the Duchess of Cambridge. ¿It¿s cold enough,¿ the Queen concurred. On the adjacent balcony, the Duchess of Sussex (above) joined the Countess of Wessex and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

¿Isn¿t it freezing?¿ the Duchess of Cornwall observed just before the start. ¿Quite bracing,¿ added the Duchess of Cambridge. ¿It¿s cold enough,¿ the Queen concurred. On the adjacent balcony, the Duchess of Sussex (above) joined the Countess of Wessex and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

‘Isn’t it freezing?’ the Duchess of Cornwall observed just before the start. ‘Quite bracing,’ added the Duchess of Cambridge. ‘It’s cold enough,’ the Queen concurred. On the adjacent balcony, the Duchess of Sussex (above) joined the Countess of Wessex and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

Come the wreath-laying, however, his neck remained as stiff as ever, prompting the usual did he?/didn’t he? online debate about whether his micro-inflexion of the head qualified as a bow or not.

Given that this has become an annual issue and that he is in the middle of an election campaign, it would surely have done no harm to give an unequivocal nod to the ‘Glorious Dead’. Yet he did not.

The Labour leader had already attracted criticism for his no-show at Saturday night’s Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall. 

While the Prime Minister sat alongside members of the Royal Family, the Labour Party was represented by the shadow foreign secretary, Emily Thornberry. 

Mr Corbyn’s officials later said that he had been waylaid meeting flood victims in Yorkshire.

For this centenary service, there had been a number of changes to the usual running order, correcting a few historic oversights. 

All the UK’s dependent territories, including Bermuda, the Falkland Islands and the Cayman Islands, had been invited to send a representative to lay a wreath ahead of the rest of the Commonwealth.

Previously, their role would be recognised collectively in a single wreath laid on their behalf by the Foreign Secretary. Here for the first time, too, was the Nepalese ambassador. 

Nepal, famously, was never subsumed into the British Empire and thus has never joined the Commonwealth.

For more than two centuries, however, the British Army has been grateful for the heroism of Nepalese Gurkhas in almost every major conflict. 

Henceforth, the Nepalese ambassador will take part in this event every year, as the Irish ambassador has done since 2014. The formalities over, the great Royal British Legion parade set off along Whitehall.

In pride of place this year, were a dozen or so Normandy veterans in recognition of the 75th anniversary of D-Day. 

This morning, all are welcome there for the traditional November 11 ceremony marking the actual anniversary of Armistice. Back in 1919, some doubted whether the bold idea of a two-minute silence would ever work

This morning, all are welcome there for the traditional November 11 ceremony marking the actual anniversary of Armistice. Back in 1919, some doubted whether the bold idea of a two-minute silence would ever work

This morning, all are welcome there for the traditional November 11 ceremony marking the actual anniversary of Armistice. Back in 1919, some doubted whether the bold idea of a two-minute silence would ever work

There, at the very front, I spotted Frank Baugh, 95, the former Royal Navy signalman who delivered that superb off-the-cuff speech at this summer’s memorial service in front of millions of television viewers at the Commonwealth cemetery in Bayeux.

After describing the carnage he encountered during more than 100 trips on to the beaches in his battered landing craft, he had concluded simply: ‘Thank you for listening to me.’ There was barely a dry eye in Bayeux.

Alongside him yesterday was former Royal Army Service Corps driver, Allan Gullis, 95. He had been a plum target as he drove trucks full of petrol and ammunition across Normandy in 1944 but had somehow dodged the German artillery. At one point, he had given a few gallons of fuel to a French farmer desperate for help with his harvest. 

The farmer thanked him with two bottles of what turned out to be Calvados and he has carried a hip flask of the stuff ever since. ‘That’s why they call me Calvados Al,’ he chuckled, offering me a sip.

On they came, the Monte Cassino veterans, the Falklands veterans, the Sea Harrier Association, the Northern Ireland Army Dog Unit (with their ceremonial dog leads round their neck), the Royal Air Force Police Association in their white berets… 

‘They’re known as “the Snowdrops” – not the snowflakes,’ chipped in David Dimbleby, deftly steering BBC1’s superb coverage through both lighter moments and the heartbreaking testimonies of those for whom this day is always a trial.

Waiting around the corner, as they do every year, were hundreds of London cabbies preparing to ferry veterans across the capital free-of-charge.

Some familiar faces, however, were missing. Since places on this parade are always over-subscribed, the Royal British Legion decided to prune its lists to ensure that veterans take priority over civilians.

This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the Cenotaph itself but of the two-minute silence at 11am. Both were introduced by George V in 1919, a mere seven years before the Queen¿s birth. Her Majesty is pictured with the Duchess of Cambridge

This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the Cenotaph itself but of the two-minute silence at 11am. Both were introduced by George V in 1919, a mere seven years before the Queen¿s birth. Her Majesty is pictured with the Duchess of Cambridge

This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the Cenotaph itself but of the two-minute silence at 11am. Both were introduced by George V in 1919, a mere seven years before the Queen’s birth. Her Majesty is pictured with the Duchess of Cambridge

By the legion’s own admission, it has not been easy. As a result, organisations like the Girl Guides, the Women’s Institute, the Boys Brigade and the Shot at Dawn Association (honouring those shot for disobeying orders) were not in the line-up this year.

Nor was Equity, the acting union. This seemed a pity in the centenary year of the Royal Variety Performance. 

We may associate it with pop stars and tame mother-in-law jokes – next week’s event features Sir Rod Stewart and Robbie Williams in front of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge – but George V ordained that the first ‘Royal Variety’ should ‘show his appreciation of the generous manner in which artistes of the variety stage had helped with the war.’

Featuring everything from clowns to Sir Edward Elgar, it was such a success that it has been an annual fixture for the Royal Variety Charity ever since.

Another legacy of that year was Edwin Lutyens’s plan for a centrepiece to the 1919 Victory Parade. 

There, at the very front, I spotted Frank Baugh, 95, the former Royal Navy signalman who delivered that superb off-the-cuff speech at this summer¿s memorial service in front of millions of television viewers at the Commonwealth cemetery in Bayeux. He is pictured in Normandy

There, at the very front, I spotted Frank Baugh, 95, the former Royal Navy signalman who delivered that superb off-the-cuff speech at this summer¿s memorial service in front of millions of television viewers at the Commonwealth cemetery in Bayeux. He is pictured in Normandy

There, at the very front, I spotted Frank Baugh, 95, the former Royal Navy signalman who delivered that superb off-the-cuff speech at this summer’s memorial service in front of millions of television viewers at the Commonwealth cemetery in Bayeux. He is pictured in Normandy

He designed an empty coffin on top of a pillar and called it a ‘cenotaph’ (empty tomb in ancient Greek). The original was just a temporary structure of wood and plaster.

Then something remarkable happened. Grieving families chose to project their grief on to this empty tomb, imagining that it might contain the spirit of their own fallen loved one.

In no time, it was piled high with flowers as public demands grew for it to become permanent. Come November 11, the crowds were colossal. 

The Government duly commissioned Lutyens to rebuild his ‘empty tomb’ for eternity in Portland stone. To this day, it carries no religious markings and no reference to victory.

This morning, all are welcome there for the traditional November 11 ceremony marking the actual anniversary of Armistice. Back in 1919, some doubted whether the bold idea of a two-minute silence would ever work.

However, as the Mail’s correspondent noted afterwards: ‘Yesterday’s simple rite had the grandeur and majesty of sheer sincerity in tragic expression. It was, in one word, worthy.’ And so it remains.

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Diet that means you’ll NEVER crave cake again

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Throughout my career as a neuroscientist, I have been investigating a mystery. I call it the obesity mystery, but it applies to anyone who has ever undertaken more than one diet.

The mystery is why we capable, smart, modern women (and men) can’t lose the weight we know we need to lose.

As a species we are getting fatter. The statistics are as bad as you think — roughly two billion people worldwide are overweight, and in the UK almost a third of adults are obese.

Last week, it was reported that one in ten hospital admissions in the UK is for weight-related type 2 diabetes, costing the NHS £22 million a day.

Susan Peirce Thompson says the secret to losing weight is sticking to four rules. Pictured: An anonymous woman eats chocolate

Susan Peirce Thompson says the secret to losing weight is sticking to four rules. Pictured: An anonymous woman eats chocolate

Susan Peirce Thompson says the secret to losing weight is sticking to four rules. Pictured: An anonymous woman eats chocolate

We know it’s bad for us and yet, no matter how hard we try, most of us are abject failures when it comes to losing the spare tyre or muffin top.

Across all people and all programmes, diets have a 99 per cent failure rate, according to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, and fewer than 1 per cent of overweight people are able to achieve a normal BMI within one year. 

Why are people failing so badly? And why isn’t anyone questioning the fact that intelligent, competent, motivated people who want to get slim just can’t?

I was one of them. As a young woman at university, I could get myself to do everything I needed to graduate with the highest honours and to finish a PhD in brain and cognitive sciences, but I could not control my eating. It was misery.

I knew, even as I put the marshmallows or the ice cream in my mouth, that I was self-sabotaging, but I just couldn’t stop. I was sickeningly disappointed in myself.

So how did I solve the mystery and, yes, get slim, too?

In the end, I discovered, it’s all down to our brains. The reason we can’t lose weight is that our bodies have not evolved to be able to process modern food.

No need to exercise! 

You were waiting for the good news? 

This is a no-exercise plan.

Dieters deplete their willpower in the gym and overeat later — we have found people who still exercise lose the least. 

Once the Bright Lines require no willpower, then get back to exercise.

What we’ve been putting in our mouths since the end of World War II has been hijacking our brains, rewiring them to block every attempt at losing weight.

The frustrating obstacle that creates that depressing ‘fewer than 1 per cent’ statistic is inside our own heads.

The fact is, when we overload on sugar and flour, our insulin levels rise. And when insulin rises, it blocks a crucial hormone called leptin. It is leptin that tells our brains we’ve had enough to eat, and therefore to stop eating; when we increase leptin resistance, the brain thinks it’s perpetually starving.

The result? An insatiable hunger that drives people mindlessly to put food in their mouths all day — in other words, to graze.

But it’s not just that. The over-consumption of sweet and processed foods means our brains are being flooded every few hours with an onslaught of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that reacts to pleasurable stimuli such as sugar and sex.

But our brains don’t like this overload and try to reduce it by thinning out dopamine receptors, which means you have to eat more starchy, sugary foods to get the same ‘hit’.

Boom. That’s how you end up with food cravings, and fall into the soul-destroying trap of binge-eating.

What’s more, our brains have only a finite amount of willpower for us to use.

Alcohol is sugar that lowers your resistance to doing foolish things. So beware! (stock photo)

Alcohol is sugar that lowers your resistance to doing foolish things. So beware! (stock photo)

Alcohol is sugar that lowers your resistance to doing foolish things. So beware! (stock photo)

When people fail at a diet, they often blame themselves and their lack of discipline, but exerting self-control in one area of our lives — keeping our patience with our children, say, or concentrating on one task at work — exhausts this finite resource and prevents self-regulation in other areas.

At the end of a long day, our brains are incapable of making a wise choice about what to eat. It’s not our fault — we have literally and unavoidably run out of willpower.

So, what’s the solution?

I believe it lies in getting rid of those modern foods that handicap our brains, by following four clear, unambiguous rules.

I call these the Bright Lines that you must never cross: Ditch sugar. Ditch flour. Weigh all your portions precisely. Eat three meals a day. And that’s it!

If you commit to these Bright Lines, you do something important. You stop thinking about food and relying on unreliable willpower and, instead, allow your ‘automatic brain’ to take over.

What do I mean by that?

Well, the difference between using willpower and using your automatic brain to accomplish something is huge.

If you have ever tried adding a new habit to your routine (jogging, doing the washing-up before work, meditation), you have probably experienced what it’s like to forget, get too busy or decide to skip it.

Say goodbye to sugar: Only by taking sugar out of the equation can the brain and body heal (stock photo)

Say goodbye to sugar: Only by taking sugar out of the equation can the brain and body heal (stock photo)

Say goodbye to sugar: Only by taking sugar out of the equation can the brain and body heal (stock photo)

But now think about brushing your teeth. I bet in a year’s time you will have accomplished brushing your teeth 730 times, regardless of travel, sickness or work stress. It’s non-negotiable.

What’s more, you spend zero energy worrying that you won’t get it done. When something becomes automatic, it frees up tremendous cognitive resources to be used for other things. Best of all, this way of eating will help you lose excess weight quickly, meaning that if you don’t cross those Bright Lines, you can slim down for Christmas.

On average, people lose 1lb to 3lb per week following these rules. It’s important to note here that, contrary to widespread belief, there is no scientific evidence proving that it’s better to lose weight slowly.

So let’s get started with those four unbreakable rules.

1. Say goodbye to sugar

This is the most important rule, or Bright Line, without which none of the others stands a chance. Only by taking sugar out of the equation can the brain and body heal.

This means eliminating sugar in all forms: cane sugar, beet sugar, brown sugar, icing sugar, honey, agave, maple syrup, golden syrup, saccharine, NutraSweet, aspartame, sorbitol, and, yes, stevia and Truvía, as well as sucrose and dextrose.

Indeed, anything ending in -ose is to be avoided, except fructose that occurs naturally in fruit — you’ll be limiting your intake of fruit, but not eliminating it.

2. Flour is not your friend

Flour is a sneaky seductress. So many people start the Bright Line eating plan having experimented with giving up sugar only to find that their flour consumption, and as a result, their weight, ballooned.

We know that flour raises insulin and blocks leptin — and, remember, no one has ever driven out in the rain at 3am to get tomato sauce and mozzarella on broccoli.

Why do people rate pizza as the most addictive food in existence? It’s the flour.

3. Stick to three set meals

When regular meals become part of the scaffolding of your life, it takes the burden off willpower.

When you set up a schedule where you eat three meals a day at regular mealtimes (breakfast at breakfast time, lunch at lunchtime, and dinner at dinnertime), and in a designated place that is not your car, your sofa or the multiplex cinema, not only does eating the right foods become automatic, but passing up the wrong foods between meals does, too.

Flour is a sneaky seductress. So many people start the Bright Line eating plan having experimented with giving up sugar only to find that their flour consumption, and as a result, their weight, ballooned (stock photo)

Flour is a sneaky seductress. So many people start the Bright Line eating plan having experimented with giving up sugar only to find that their flour consumption, and as a result, their weight, ballooned (stock photo)

Flour is a sneaky seductress. So many people start the Bright Line eating plan having experimented with giving up sugar only to find that their flour consumption, and as a result, their weight, ballooned (stock photo)

4. Scales at the ready

This is the rule that clicks everything into place and ensures your weight will melt off: weigh all your portions.

It works even if you are post-menopausal, on medication that increases your hunger, or genetically predisposed to obesity.

I recommend using a digital food scale. Seriously. Initially, when measuring out my portions was first suggested to me, I refused to do it. And I kept struggling with my weight. But then I tried it, and what I found was that weighing my food with a digital scale gave me psychological freedom.

The Eating Plan

These are the basics of the plan. For the complete meal programme, including quantities, portions, and a full food list, see my new book.

At breakfast, eat one portion of protein (one serving equals two eggs or 8oz of yoghurt), one breakfast grain (1oz of oatmeal, say) and one portion of fruit (the quantity depends on the size — one banana, three apricots or 6oz of grapes all equal one portion).

At lunch, eat one portion of protein (take this to be 2oz cheese; 4oz hummus; or 4oz tofu, chicken or fish), 6oz vegetables, one portion of fat (1 tbsp butter or olive oil) and then one portion of fruit.

Dinner equals another portion of protein (4oz beef or lamb, or 6oz lentils or beans), 6oz vegetables, 8oz salad, and one portion of fat (2oz avocado or olives).

Golden grains

Whole grains, such as oats or brown rice, are perfectly fine on the Bright Line Eating plan. We also count potatoes and sweet potatoes as ‘grains’, so try some for breakfast, perhaps in a Spanish tortilla.

For cold wholegrain cereal (Shredded Wheat, for example, which has no flour), weigh out exactly 1oz and either eat it dry or add milk or unsweetened yoghurt, which you count as your protein.

NO BLTs!

Weigh your food precisely. No BLTs — bites, licks, or tastes — while you’re cooking, which means no popping veggies into your mouth off the cutting board.

Your first bite of food should be taken once you’re sitting at the table with cutlery in hand.

The Odd Glass Is Ok

The odd glass of red wine on a special occasion works for some, but not for me. Molecularly, alcohol is sugar plus ethanol. Ethanol makes you intoxicated. Basically, alcohol is sugar that lowers your resistance to doing foolish things. So beware!

Adapted from The Official Bright Line Eating Cookbook: Weight Loss Made Simple by Susan Peirce Thompson, published by Hay House, £23.99. © Susan Peirce Thompson

AND THE RECIPES ARE SO EASY! 

Breakfast

Cheese and Rice Omelette

Ingredients

  • 1oz shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1 egg
  • 4oz cooked rice
  • 6oz mixed berries, to serve

Number of servings: 1

Cheese and Rice Omelette: Whisk the cheese and egg together in a small bowl. Warm the rice in a small non-stick pan over medium-high heat

Cheese and Rice Omelette: Whisk the cheese and egg together in a small bowl. Warm the rice in a small non-stick pan over medium-high heat

Cheese and Rice Omelette: Whisk the cheese and egg together in a small bowl. Warm the rice in a small non-stick pan over medium-high heat

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

FRUIT: 6oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

GRAIN: 1 serving

Preparation

Whisk the cheese and egg together in a small bowl. Warm the rice in a small non-stick pan over medium-high heat.

When the rice is heated through, create a hole in the centre and pour in the egg mixture.

Immediately start scrambling the egg mixture into the rice.

Keep turning every 10 seconds or so until the egg is cooked and the shredded cheese is melted. Serve with the mixed berries on the side.

Sunday Breakfast Rustic Patties

Ingredients

  • 4oz steamed sweet potato
  • 2oz banana
  • 1 egg
  • 1½ oz cooked lentils
  • 1 tsp cinnamon (optional)
  • 2oz yoghurt
  • 4oz blueberries (fresh or frozen)

Number of servings: 1

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

FRUIT: 6oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

GRAIN: 1 serving

Preparation

Lightly mash the sweet potato and banana together with a fork. Crack the egg and mix it in well. Combine the lentils, adding the cinnamon if you like.

Preheat a large non-stick pan over a medium heat.

Add the mixture to the pan in large spoonfuls and cook each side for 2 to 3 minutes on a medium heat. Serve with yoghurt and berries.

Lunch

Texas Caviar

Texas Caviar: Place the frozen sweetcorn in a large bowl. Drain the black beans and black-eyed beans, rinse thoroughly and add to the sweetcorn

Texas Caviar: Place the frozen sweetcorn in a large bowl. Drain the black beans and black-eyed beans, rinse thoroughly and add to the sweetcorn

Texas Caviar: Place the frozen sweetcorn in a large bowl. Drain the black beans and black-eyed beans, rinse thoroughly and add to the sweetcorn

Ingredients

  • 12oz frozen sweetcorn
  • 16oz cooked black beans
  • 8oz cooked black-eyed beans
  • 2oz sweet onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp ground cumin
  • 10oz chopped tomatoes, canned or fresh
  • Pinch each of salt and black pepper
  • 2oz olive oil
  • 2oz apple cider vinegar
  • ½ bunch fresh coriander, with roughly chopped leaves
  • 1 avocado, chopped

Number of servings: 4

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

VEGETABLES: 6oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

FAT: 1 serving

Preparation

Place the frozen sweetcorn in a large bowl. Drain the black beans and black-eyed beans, rinse thoroughly and add to the sweetcorn. Add the onion, garlic, cumin, and tomatoes with juice. Stir together. Sprinkle the mixture with salt and pepper, then add the oil and vinegar.

Allow the mixture to sit so the sweetcorn completely defrosts and the flavours blend. Stir in the chopped coriander and layer the avocado on top to serve.

Dinner

Chicken and Vegetable Soup

Coconut Curry Stir-Fry: Mix the curry paste with ½ cup water in a bowl. Preheat a pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly coat it with cooking spray and saute onions

Coconut Curry Stir-Fry: Mix the curry paste with ½ cup water in a bowl. Preheat a pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly coat it with cooking spray and saute onions

Coconut Curry Stir-Fry: Mix the curry paste with ½ cup water in a bowl. Preheat a pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly coat it with cooking spray and saute onions

Ingredients

  • Olive oil spray
  • 2 ½ lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 5 celery stalks, chopped
  • 4 carrots, chopped
  • 1 medium courgette, chopped
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 4 to 6 cups chicken broth
  • 8oz chopped kale (optional)

Number of servings: Multiple

Serving size: 18oz

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

VEGETABLES: 6oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

FAT: Zero

Preparation

Coat the bottom of a soup pot with olive oil spray and add the chicken thighs. Sprinkle with salt and cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes until lightly browned.

Add the onion, celery, carrots, courgette, bay leaves and black pepper. Saute with the chicken for about 5 minutes, until the onions are translucent.

Add the broth and let it simmer for about 30 minutes, until the vegetables start to soften.

Add the kale, if using. Cook for another 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a plate using a slotted spoon and chop into bite-size pieces. Serve with 6oz of vegetables, 8oz of broth and 4oz of chicken in each bowl.

Coconut Curry Stir-Fry

Ingredients

  • 2oz red Thai curry paste
  • Coconut oil cooking spray
  • Enough stir-fry vegetables to yield 14oz cooked: onions, carrots, courgette, broccoli, sprouts, cubed butternut squash, pak choi, carrots, pepper, mushrooms
  • 4oz tofu, cubed
  • 2oz canned coconut milk

Number of servings: 1

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

VEGETABLES: 14oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

FAT: 1 serving

Preparation

Mix the curry paste with ½ cup water in a bowl. Preheat a pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly coat it with cooking spray and saute onions until translucent. Add the remaining vegetables and saute for 1 to 2 minutes. Add the curry paste mix and tofu, then immediately cover the pan. Cook until the vegetables are done to your liking, add the coconut milk and stir. 

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Watiress tells Grace Millane murder trial in New Zealand she asked defendant to choke her during sex

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The man accused of murdering British backpacker Grace Millane choked another woman during rough sex days before, a court heard today. 

The defendant, who cannot be named for legal reasons, went on a Tinder date with a waitress nine days before his fateful meeting with Grace, 22. 

She later served the pair cocktails on the night Grace, of Wickford, Essex, disappeared in Auckland, New Zealand late last year.   

The woman, who also cannot be named for legal reasons, told Auckland’s High Court she had matched with the 27-year-old alleged killer in November 2018. 

She said: ‘We asked each other what we preferred during sex and so I did mention that I liked rough sex and also choking.

‘He did say that he liked rough sex as well but I don’t remember if he said anything about choking.’ 

The defendant, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is pictured flanked by corrections officers during the opening of the trial in Auckland, New Zealand

The defendant, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is pictured flanked by corrections officers during the opening of the trial in Auckland, New Zealand

The defendant, who cannot be named for legal reasons, is pictured flanked by corrections officers during the opening of the trial in Auckland, New Zealand

Grace Millane, 22, vanished during the early hours of her 22nd birthday while on a round-the-world trip in New Zealand. Her body was later found inside a suitcase, buried in the woods, a court has heard

Grace Millane, 22, vanished during the early hours of her 22nd birthday while on a round-the-world trip in New Zealand. Her body was later found inside a suitcase, buried in the woods, a court has heard

Grace Millane, (left after graduation) vanished during the early hours of her 22nd birthday while on a round-the-world trip in New Zealand

Questioned by prosecutor Brian Dickey, she said she had gone to man’s apartment at the CityLife apartment at 7pm on November 22 to meet him for the first time.

She bought a bottle of rum and the man, who also cannot be named for legal reasons, met her in the lobby. 

‘It was a nice place,’ she said. ‘We went up to his room and we started talking to each other. 

‘I had about four glasses of rum and coke and he drank about four bottles of Heineken. 

‘After he went to bathroom he kissed me and from there it went to the bed.’ 

During sex, she said, ‘he did choke me a bit because that’s a preference of mine, just one hand around my neck. 

Miss Millane's body was found in a wooded area near Auckland a week after she was last seen at a hotel in Auckland city centre, a court heard

Miss Millane's body was found in a wooded area near Auckland a week after she was last seen at a hotel in Auckland city centre, a court heard

Miss Millane’s body was found in a wooded area near Auckland a week after she was last seen at a hotel in Auckland city centre, a court heard

‘It was fine, it was consensual. My breath was a bit restricted but it was something that gave me pleasure. 

‘It wasn’t too hard that I gasping for air but it wasn’t so soft that I wouldn’t be able to feel it. It was the right pressure 

‘I didn’t have to push him off me. He let me go when I reached…’

The woman said after ordering in pizza and sharing it she had left the man asleep but tried to contact him again after realising she had left her glasses behind. 

But the alleged killer didn’t return them and she didn’t see him again until he walked into the bar where she worked on the night of December 1, this time with Grace, who he had also met through Tinder. 

‘He came in with a young lady and they walked across the bar to go to a table,’ she told the court. 

‘I wasn’t sure it was him until I saw the tattoo on his arm. ‘She looked European. She was wearing a black dress with shoulder length hair.’ 

The woman served the couple drinks and as he was paying, the woman told him how frustrating it was not to have to her glasses. 

Three days later, having buried Grace in a suitcase in remote woodland, he dropped the glasses off at the bar. 

Under cross-examination, the woman said when she first spoke to police about the date, which she described as ‘just a hook-up’, she had not mentioned the choking because she ‘just forgot’. 

The man denies murder. The trial continues. 

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