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Diet that means you’ll NEVER crave cake again

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Throughout my career as a neuroscientist, I have been investigating a mystery. I call it the obesity mystery, but it applies to anyone who has ever undertaken more than one diet.

The mystery is why we capable, smart, modern women (and men) can’t lose the weight we know we need to lose.

As a species we are getting fatter. The statistics are as bad as you think — roughly two billion people worldwide are overweight, and in the UK almost a third of adults are obese.

Last week, it was reported that one in ten hospital admissions in the UK is for weight-related type 2 diabetes, costing the NHS £22 million a day.

Susan Peirce Thompson says the secret to losing weight is sticking to four rules. Pictured: An anonymous woman eats chocolate

Susan Peirce Thompson says the secret to losing weight is sticking to four rules. Pictured: An anonymous woman eats chocolate

Susan Peirce Thompson says the secret to losing weight is sticking to four rules. Pictured: An anonymous woman eats chocolate

We know it’s bad for us and yet, no matter how hard we try, most of us are abject failures when it comes to losing the spare tyre or muffin top.

Across all people and all programmes, diets have a 99 per cent failure rate, according to a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, and fewer than 1 per cent of overweight people are able to achieve a normal BMI within one year. 

Why are people failing so badly? And why isn’t anyone questioning the fact that intelligent, competent, motivated people who want to get slim just can’t?

I was one of them. As a young woman at university, I could get myself to do everything I needed to graduate with the highest honours and to finish a PhD in brain and cognitive sciences, but I could not control my eating. It was misery.

I knew, even as I put the marshmallows or the ice cream in my mouth, that I was self-sabotaging, but I just couldn’t stop. I was sickeningly disappointed in myself.

So how did I solve the mystery and, yes, get slim, too?

In the end, I discovered, it’s all down to our brains. The reason we can’t lose weight is that our bodies have not evolved to be able to process modern food.

No need to exercise! 

You were waiting for the good news? 

This is a no-exercise plan.

Dieters deplete their willpower in the gym and overeat later — we have found people who still exercise lose the least. 

Once the Bright Lines require no willpower, then get back to exercise.

What we’ve been putting in our mouths since the end of World War II has been hijacking our brains, rewiring them to block every attempt at losing weight.

The frustrating obstacle that creates that depressing ‘fewer than 1 per cent’ statistic is inside our own heads.

The fact is, when we overload on sugar and flour, our insulin levels rise. And when insulin rises, it blocks a crucial hormone called leptin. It is leptin that tells our brains we’ve had enough to eat, and therefore to stop eating; when we increase leptin resistance, the brain thinks it’s perpetually starving.

The result? An insatiable hunger that drives people mindlessly to put food in their mouths all day — in other words, to graze.

But it’s not just that. The over-consumption of sweet and processed foods means our brains are being flooded every few hours with an onslaught of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that reacts to pleasurable stimuli such as sugar and sex.

But our brains don’t like this overload and try to reduce it by thinning out dopamine receptors, which means you have to eat more starchy, sugary foods to get the same ‘hit’.

Boom. That’s how you end up with food cravings, and fall into the soul-destroying trap of binge-eating.

What’s more, our brains have only a finite amount of willpower for us to use.

Alcohol is sugar that lowers your resistance to doing foolish things. So beware! (stock photo)

Alcohol is sugar that lowers your resistance to doing foolish things. So beware! (stock photo)

Alcohol is sugar that lowers your resistance to doing foolish things. So beware! (stock photo)

When people fail at a diet, they often blame themselves and their lack of discipline, but exerting self-control in one area of our lives — keeping our patience with our children, say, or concentrating on one task at work — exhausts this finite resource and prevents self-regulation in other areas.

At the end of a long day, our brains are incapable of making a wise choice about what to eat. It’s not our fault — we have literally and unavoidably run out of willpower.

So, what’s the solution?

I believe it lies in getting rid of those modern foods that handicap our brains, by following four clear, unambiguous rules.

I call these the Bright Lines that you must never cross: Ditch sugar. Ditch flour. Weigh all your portions precisely. Eat three meals a day. And that’s it!

If you commit to these Bright Lines, you do something important. You stop thinking about food and relying on unreliable willpower and, instead, allow your ‘automatic brain’ to take over.

What do I mean by that?

Well, the difference between using willpower and using your automatic brain to accomplish something is huge.

If you have ever tried adding a new habit to your routine (jogging, doing the washing-up before work, meditation), you have probably experienced what it’s like to forget, get too busy or decide to skip it.

Say goodbye to sugar: Only by taking sugar out of the equation can the brain and body heal (stock photo)

Say goodbye to sugar: Only by taking sugar out of the equation can the brain and body heal (stock photo)

Say goodbye to sugar: Only by taking sugar out of the equation can the brain and body heal (stock photo)

But now think about brushing your teeth. I bet in a year’s time you will have accomplished brushing your teeth 730 times, regardless of travel, sickness or work stress. It’s non-negotiable.

What’s more, you spend zero energy worrying that you won’t get it done. When something becomes automatic, it frees up tremendous cognitive resources to be used for other things. Best of all, this way of eating will help you lose excess weight quickly, meaning that if you don’t cross those Bright Lines, you can slim down for Christmas.

On average, people lose 1lb to 3lb per week following these rules. It’s important to note here that, contrary to widespread belief, there is no scientific evidence proving that it’s better to lose weight slowly.

So let’s get started with those four unbreakable rules.

1. Say goodbye to sugar

This is the most important rule, or Bright Line, without which none of the others stands a chance. Only by taking sugar out of the equation can the brain and body heal.

This means eliminating sugar in all forms: cane sugar, beet sugar, brown sugar, icing sugar, honey, agave, maple syrup, golden syrup, saccharine, NutraSweet, aspartame, sorbitol, and, yes, stevia and Truvía, as well as sucrose and dextrose.

Indeed, anything ending in -ose is to be avoided, except fructose that occurs naturally in fruit — you’ll be limiting your intake of fruit, but not eliminating it.

2. Flour is not your friend

Flour is a sneaky seductress. So many people start the Bright Line eating plan having experimented with giving up sugar only to find that their flour consumption, and as a result, their weight, ballooned.

We know that flour raises insulin and blocks leptin — and, remember, no one has ever driven out in the rain at 3am to get tomato sauce and mozzarella on broccoli.

Why do people rate pizza as the most addictive food in existence? It’s the flour.

3. Stick to three set meals

When regular meals become part of the scaffolding of your life, it takes the burden off willpower.

When you set up a schedule where you eat three meals a day at regular mealtimes (breakfast at breakfast time, lunch at lunchtime, and dinner at dinnertime), and in a designated place that is not your car, your sofa or the multiplex cinema, not only does eating the right foods become automatic, but passing up the wrong foods between meals does, too.

Flour is a sneaky seductress. So many people start the Bright Line eating plan having experimented with giving up sugar only to find that their flour consumption, and as a result, their weight, ballooned (stock photo)

Flour is a sneaky seductress. So many people start the Bright Line eating plan having experimented with giving up sugar only to find that their flour consumption, and as a result, their weight, ballooned (stock photo)

Flour is a sneaky seductress. So many people start the Bright Line eating plan having experimented with giving up sugar only to find that their flour consumption, and as a result, their weight, ballooned (stock photo)

4. Scales at the ready

This is the rule that clicks everything into place and ensures your weight will melt off: weigh all your portions.

It works even if you are post-menopausal, on medication that increases your hunger, or genetically predisposed to obesity.

I recommend using a digital food scale. Seriously. Initially, when measuring out my portions was first suggested to me, I refused to do it. And I kept struggling with my weight. But then I tried it, and what I found was that weighing my food with a digital scale gave me psychological freedom.

The Eating Plan

These are the basics of the plan. For the complete meal programme, including quantities, portions, and a full food list, see my new book.

At breakfast, eat one portion of protein (one serving equals two eggs or 8oz of yoghurt), one breakfast grain (1oz of oatmeal, say) and one portion of fruit (the quantity depends on the size — one banana, three apricots or 6oz of grapes all equal one portion).

At lunch, eat one portion of protein (take this to be 2oz cheese; 4oz hummus; or 4oz tofu, chicken or fish), 6oz vegetables, one portion of fat (1 tbsp butter or olive oil) and then one portion of fruit.

Dinner equals another portion of protein (4oz beef or lamb, or 6oz lentils or beans), 6oz vegetables, 8oz salad, and one portion of fat (2oz avocado or olives).

Golden grains

Whole grains, such as oats or brown rice, are perfectly fine on the Bright Line Eating plan. We also count potatoes and sweet potatoes as ‘grains’, so try some for breakfast, perhaps in a Spanish tortilla.

For cold wholegrain cereal (Shredded Wheat, for example, which has no flour), weigh out exactly 1oz and either eat it dry or add milk or unsweetened yoghurt, which you count as your protein.

NO BLTs!

Weigh your food precisely. No BLTs — bites, licks, or tastes — while you’re cooking, which means no popping veggies into your mouth off the cutting board.

Your first bite of food should be taken once you’re sitting at the table with cutlery in hand.

The Odd Glass Is Ok

The odd glass of red wine on a special occasion works for some, but not for me. Molecularly, alcohol is sugar plus ethanol. Ethanol makes you intoxicated. Basically, alcohol is sugar that lowers your resistance to doing foolish things. So beware!

Adapted from The Official Bright Line Eating Cookbook: Weight Loss Made Simple by Susan Peirce Thompson, published by Hay House, £23.99. © Susan Peirce Thompson

AND THE RECIPES ARE SO EASY! 

Breakfast

Cheese and Rice Omelette

Ingredients

  • 1oz shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1 egg
  • 4oz cooked rice
  • 6oz mixed berries, to serve

Number of servings: 1

Cheese and Rice Omelette: Whisk the cheese and egg together in a small bowl. Warm the rice in a small non-stick pan over medium-high heat

Cheese and Rice Omelette: Whisk the cheese and egg together in a small bowl. Warm the rice in a small non-stick pan over medium-high heat

Cheese and Rice Omelette: Whisk the cheese and egg together in a small bowl. Warm the rice in a small non-stick pan over medium-high heat

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

FRUIT: 6oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

GRAIN: 1 serving

Preparation

Whisk the cheese and egg together in a small bowl. Warm the rice in a small non-stick pan over medium-high heat.

When the rice is heated through, create a hole in the centre and pour in the egg mixture.

Immediately start scrambling the egg mixture into the rice.

Keep turning every 10 seconds or so until the egg is cooked and the shredded cheese is melted. Serve with the mixed berries on the side.

Sunday Breakfast Rustic Patties

Ingredients

  • 4oz steamed sweet potato
  • 2oz banana
  • 1 egg
  • 1½ oz cooked lentils
  • 1 tsp cinnamon (optional)
  • 2oz yoghurt
  • 4oz blueberries (fresh or frozen)

Number of servings: 1

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

FRUIT: 6oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

GRAIN: 1 serving

Preparation

Lightly mash the sweet potato and banana together with a fork. Crack the egg and mix it in well. Combine the lentils, adding the cinnamon if you like.

Preheat a large non-stick pan over a medium heat.

Add the mixture to the pan in large spoonfuls and cook each side for 2 to 3 minutes on a medium heat. Serve with yoghurt and berries.

Lunch

Texas Caviar

Texas Caviar: Place the frozen sweetcorn in a large bowl. Drain the black beans and black-eyed beans, rinse thoroughly and add to the sweetcorn

Texas Caviar: Place the frozen sweetcorn in a large bowl. Drain the black beans and black-eyed beans, rinse thoroughly and add to the sweetcorn

Texas Caviar: Place the frozen sweetcorn in a large bowl. Drain the black beans and black-eyed beans, rinse thoroughly and add to the sweetcorn

Ingredients

  • 12oz frozen sweetcorn
  • 16oz cooked black beans
  • 8oz cooked black-eyed beans
  • 2oz sweet onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp ground cumin
  • 10oz chopped tomatoes, canned or fresh
  • Pinch each of salt and black pepper
  • 2oz olive oil
  • 2oz apple cider vinegar
  • ½ bunch fresh coriander, with roughly chopped leaves
  • 1 avocado, chopped

Number of servings: 4

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

VEGETABLES: 6oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

FAT: 1 serving

Preparation

Place the frozen sweetcorn in a large bowl. Drain the black beans and black-eyed beans, rinse thoroughly and add to the sweetcorn. Add the onion, garlic, cumin, and tomatoes with juice. Stir together. Sprinkle the mixture with salt and pepper, then add the oil and vinegar.

Allow the mixture to sit so the sweetcorn completely defrosts and the flavours blend. Stir in the chopped coriander and layer the avocado on top to serve.

Dinner

Chicken and Vegetable Soup

Coconut Curry Stir-Fry: Mix the curry paste with ½ cup water in a bowl. Preheat a pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly coat it with cooking spray and saute onions

Coconut Curry Stir-Fry: Mix the curry paste with ½ cup water in a bowl. Preheat a pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly coat it with cooking spray and saute onions

Coconut Curry Stir-Fry: Mix the curry paste with ½ cup water in a bowl. Preheat a pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly coat it with cooking spray and saute onions

Ingredients

  • Olive oil spray
  • 2 ½ lb boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 5 celery stalks, chopped
  • 4 carrots, chopped
  • 1 medium courgette, chopped
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 4 to 6 cups chicken broth
  • 8oz chopped kale (optional)

Number of servings: Multiple

Serving size: 18oz

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

VEGETABLES: 6oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

FAT: Zero

Preparation

Coat the bottom of a soup pot with olive oil spray and add the chicken thighs. Sprinkle with salt and cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes until lightly browned.

Add the onion, celery, carrots, courgette, bay leaves and black pepper. Saute with the chicken for about 5 minutes, until the onions are translucent.

Add the broth and let it simmer for about 30 minutes, until the vegetables start to soften.

Add the kale, if using. Cook for another 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a plate using a slotted spoon and chop into bite-size pieces. Serve with 6oz of vegetables, 8oz of broth and 4oz of chicken in each bowl.

Coconut Curry Stir-Fry

Ingredients

  • 2oz red Thai curry paste
  • Coconut oil cooking spray
  • Enough stir-fry vegetables to yield 14oz cooked: onions, carrots, courgette, broccoli, sprouts, cubed butternut squash, pak choi, carrots, pepper, mushrooms
  • 4oz tofu, cubed
  • 2oz canned coconut milk

Number of servings: 1

EACH SERVING PROVIDES:

VEGETABLES: 14oz

PROTEIN: 1 serving

FAT: 1 serving

Preparation

Mix the curry paste with ½ cup water in a bowl. Preheat a pan over a medium-high heat. Lightly coat it with cooking spray and saute onions until translucent. Add the remaining vegetables and saute for 1 to 2 minutes. Add the curry paste mix and tofu, then immediately cover the pan. Cook until the vegetables are done to your liking, add the coconut milk and stir. 

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Fever-Tree losing its fizz in the UK as the firm slashes sales forecast

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Tonic maker Fever-Tree has lost a bit of its fizz as it cut its sales expectations for the year, blaming a slowdown in consumer spending in the UK. 

The AIM-listed company – which had previously warned that it would be difficult to repeat last year’s stellar performance – said sales to supermarkets and off-licences were behind expectations due to a ‘wider slowdown in consumer retail spending’.

In the UK, its most mature market, it expects to see sales growth of just 2 per cent this year, which is significantly down from sales growth of 53 per cent in 2018, when it saw an ‘exceptionally strong’ summer.

Fever-Tree said sales of its tonic waters and other drinks to supermarkets and off-licences were behind expectations due to a 'wider slowdown in consumer retail spending'

Fever-Tree said sales of its tonic waters and other drinks to supermarkets and off-licences were behind expectations due to a 'wider slowdown in consumer retail spending'

Fever-Tree said sales of its tonic waters and other drinks to supermarkets and off-licences were behind expectations due to a ‘wider slowdown in consumer retail spending’

The slowdown in the UK was partly offset by much faster growth in the US, Europe and other parts of the world, where it expects sales to be 34 per cent, 19 per cent and 35 per cent higher than last year.  

Overall, Fever-Tree now see revenues to come in between £266million and £268million, or growth of between 12 and 13 per cent, down compared to analysts expectations of £275million. 

Shares in Fever-Tree fell as much as 8 per cent at the open but recovered to close 7.8 per cent higher at £20.04 on Wednesday. 

They have risen from a flotation price of 134p in 2014 to an all-time high of £41.20 last September. 

Fever-Tree chief executive Tim Warrillow said the part of the business which supplies its drinks to bars, restaurants, clubs and hotels, continued to perform well in the second half of the year, after gaining a number of new accounts.

He also said that sales accelerated in Europe and were ahead of forecasts in the US, where the company has signed new distribution deals and a contract with a new bottling partner on the West Coast for 2020. 

‘We continue to see growth across all four regions. Indeed, sales accelerated in our key growth markets of the US and Europe,’ he said.

‘Fever-Tree’s progress in the US is particularly encouraging and the signing of a US bottling partner is a further step in building our operations in this exciting market.’

And added: ‘Despite challenging comparators, our performance in the UK On-Trade underlines the strength of the brand and while the mixer category in the Off-Trade is moderating alongside the recent slowdown seen across the wider grocery channel, we continue to maintain our clear UK market leadership position.’

Best known for its tonic waters, Fever-Tree has been benefiting from the rising popularity of gin in recent years, but in the UK, its most mature market, sales growth has started to slow down this year.  

Best known for its tonic waters, Fever-Tree has been benefiting from the rising popularity of gin in recent years

Best known for its tonic waters, Fever-Tree has been benefiting from the rising popularity of gin in recent years

Best known for its tonic waters, Fever-Tree has been benefiting from the rising popularity of gin in recent years

Russ Mould at AJ Bell said Fever-Tree’s problems in the UK may be down not only to a consumer spending slowdown but also to increased competition, and perhaps the beginning of gin falling out of fashion.

‘Schweppes has been pushing its 1783 tonic product more this year, Fentimans has also been taking shelf space and Lamb & Watt is another example of a rival trying to grab the tonic drinker’s attention,’ he said. 

He added: ‘Investors have been worried about a so-called transitionary period where the UK plateaus before the US gains sufficient scale. That now seems to the case, hence why the share price has been weak of late.

‘Another concern is the rise of the teetotal movement, particularly among younger people. That begs the question of whether fast growth products like gin may have seen their best days and sales growth starts to moderate in the next few years.’ 

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Heiress to Berkeley Homes £310m fortune, 26, is spared jail

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Chloe Pidgley was given a 12-month community order, unpaid work of 100 hours and up to 20 days of rehabilitation activity

Chloe Pidgley was given a 12-month community order, unpaid work of 100 hours and up to 20 days of rehabilitation activity

Chloe Pidgley was given a 12-month community order, unpaid work of 100 hours and up to 20 days of rehabilitation activity

The heiress to a £310 million property empire has been spared jail after she kicked a policeman in the crotch and spat in his colleague’s face leaving him temporarily blinded.

Chloe Pidgley, 26, admitted assaulting the officers at her flat in Earl’s Court, west London, three days after her ex Antonio Henry was jailed for brutally attacking her.

Today Pidgley was given a 12-month community order, unpaid work of 100 hours and up to 20 days of rehabilitation activity. 

The defence for the heiress, Ricky Lao said Pidgley had experienced a ‘very difficult time’. 

Henry, 29, had punched and kicked Pidgley in the face on 18 June last year before slamming her hand in a door, breaking two of her fingers.

He then threatened to come back and throw acid at Pidgley, the granddaughter of Berkeley Homes founder Tony Pidgley.

Henry, from Ealing, admitted assault and criminal damage and was jailed for 21 months at Isleworth Crown Court. 

PC Calum Jackson and PC Jake Harris were called to Pidgley’s home three days later, on 29 March, after receiving reports from the ambulance service that she was threatening to self harm. The officers turned up to find the heiress heavily intoxicated with slit wrists.

Prosecutor Katie Bryan told the court: ‘Police noticed fresh cuts to her wrists that were still bleeding at the time.

‘She invited them in and officers tried to engage with her asking questions about her visible injuries. The defendant was described as intoxicated and very emotional. She refused to engage with officers and said she wanted them to leave.’

The police officers then explained they were waiting for an ambulance and warned Pidgley that she could be sectioned if she tried to go outside, the court heard.

The court heard officers found Pidgley with cut wrists and tried to get her to wait for an ambulance before she kicked, spat at and attacked them

The court heard officers found Pidgley with cut wrists and tried to get her to wait for an ambulance before she kicked, spat at and attacked them

The court heard officers found Pidgley with cut wrists and tried to get her to wait for an ambulance before she kicked, spat at and attacked them

The court heard officers found Pidgley with cut wrists and tried to get her to wait for an ambulance before she kicked, spat at and attacked them

The court heard officers found Pidgley with cut wrists and tried to get her to wait for an ambulance before she kicked, spat at and attacked them

The prosecutor said: ‘The defendant however continued out onto the street and she described as becoming more agitated out on the pathway.

‘Traffic at that point [on her road] is described as heavy. PC Jackson placed himself between the defendant and the road and again said he would place her under section.

‘She tried to push past him at that point. He took hold of her arm. PC Harris then intervened, taking hold of the other arm and it was at that point the defendant kicked him making contact with his genitals.

‘She turned to face [PC Jackson] and spat into his face, going into his eyes.

‘He described being momentarily blinded but remained holding onto the defendant while PC Harris took her to the floor.

‘She remained on the floor kicking and shouting until ambulance services arrived and took her to A&E.’

The incident came after her ex-boyfriend was jailed for attacking her. She has previously spoken about her ordeal and has told a court she was suffering from PTSD

The incident came after her ex-boyfriend was jailed for attacking her. She has previously spoken about her ordeal and has told a court she was suffering from PTSD

The incident came after her ex-boyfriend was jailed for attacking her. She has previously spoken about her ordeal and has told a court she was suffering from PTSD

Pidgley was transferred to hospital and discharged the next day. 

Mr Lao added: ‘Miss Pidgley suffered a serious assault on her person by an ex-partner.

‘The week at the time of the incident was difficult for her as she had to go to court to deliver a victim impact statement.

‘Her former partner was sentenced to 21 months for assault and this was widely reported in the media and there were open source photographs of her injuries.

‘She was struck with a radiator and a door slammed on her hands which caused significant injury.

Pidgley's flat in Kensington is pictured above after it was boarded up after she was attacked

Pidgley's flat in Kensington is pictured above after it was boarded up after she was attacked

Pidgley’s flat in Kensington is pictured above after it was boarded up after she was attacked 

‘Miss Pidgely had difficulties dealing with this event. After the attack right up to this event there were constant reminders on social media.’ 

She admitted two counts of assault before sitting with her lawyer, sobbing at Hendon Magistrates’ Court today.

District Judge Tan Ikram at Hendon Magistrates Court noted her previous conviction of assault, accepting it was in 2015, but highlighting that it had also been on a police officer.  

‘That previous offence makes this offence more serious. I must consider a prison sentence. You pleaded guilty and I take that into account.’

However, he said considered what else had been going on in the days prior to the offences. 

He added: ‘Courts take these matters very seriously. I can deal with it with a community penalty.

‘I’m going to make a 12 month community order with two requirements. You will undertake unpaid work for 100 hours and have up to 20 days of rehabilitation activity requirement.

‘You will be meeting with probation service and will explore your use of alcohol. A referral may be made for further support.

‘You must attend all of your appointments or you’ll be in breach of that and may be resentenced.’

Pidgley told an earlier hearing that she had been suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and was struggling with the aftermath of her abusive relationship.

‘I got attacked by a boyfriend and I had to go to court over it,’ she said.

‘I have post-traumatic stress disorder and I thought my dad was going to pay for the solicitor but he changed his mind at the last minute.’

Pidgley had failed to attend an earlier hearing at Westminster Magistrates Court in August and a warrant was issued for her arrest. She then voluntarily contacted police two days later.

Tony Pidgley is the founder of the famous property developer Berkeley Homes and thought to be worth a staggering £310million.

Both Chloe and her model sister, Chantelle, reportedly received a ‘coming of age’ sum of £1million each. 

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Joker sequel ‘in the works’ after film made a billion dollars

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A sequel to the wildly successful Joker film is in the works after the film made a billion dollars at the box office.    

Director Todd Phillips is in talks to return to helm the film, while Warners already has sequel options set for star Joaquin Phoenix, according to The Hollywood Reporter

It was also revealed in the report that Todd will make around $100 million dollars because he did not take an upfront salary, rather opting for a portion of the film’s adjusted gross. 

Put on a happy face: A sequel to the wildly successful Joker film is in the works after the film made a billion dollars at the box office

Put on a happy face: A sequel to the wildly successful Joker film is in the works after the film made a billion dollars at the box office

Put on a happy face: A sequel to the wildly successful Joker film is in the works after the film made a billion dollars at the box office

It all started last month, when Todd proposed to develop a portfolio of DC characters’ origin stories during a meeting with Warner Brothers Pictures Group chairman Toby Emmerich, according to the report. 

Toby reportedly balked at the pitch, but Todd did leave with the rights to ‘at least’ one other DC story.   

Fast forward a month later, a sequel is now in the works after the film became the first R-rated movie to make a billion dollars at the box office.  

As far as the screenplay, Todd and Scott Silver will return to write the sequel.    

Back for more: Director Todd Phillips with Joker star Joaquin Phoenix

Back for more: Director Todd Phillips with Joker star Joaquin Phoenix

Back for more: Director Todd Phillips with Joker star Joaquin Phoenix 

The plot thickens: As far as the screenplay, Todd and Scott Silver will return to write the sequel

The plot thickens: As far as the screenplay, Todd and Scott Silver will return to write the sequel

The plot thickens: As far as the screenplay, Todd and Scott Silver will return to write the sequel

Joker was a hit right from the start, making $96.2 million during it’s opening weekend in early October. 

And last week it made headlines after garnering a billion dollars at the box office.  

This isn’t the first time talks of a Joker sequel have emerged.  

Jackpot: It was also revealed in the report that director Todd will make around $100 million dollars because he did not take an upfront salary, rather opting for a portion of the film's adjusted gross

Jackpot: It was also revealed in the report that director Todd will make around $100 million dollars because he did not take an upfront salary, rather opting for a portion of the film's adjusted gross

Jackpot: It was also revealed in the report that director Todd will make around $100 million dollars because he did not take an upfront salary, rather opting for a portion of the film’s adjusted gross

Intrigued by the depth of the plot, Joaquin previously expressed interest in reprising his role.   

‘I wouldn’t just do a sequel just because the first movie is successful. That’s ridiculous,’ Joaquin told the Los Angeles Times.

‘In the second or third week of shooting, I was like, “Todd [Phillips], can you start working on a sequel? There’s way too much to explore.” It was kind of in jest – but not really.’ 

Box office hit: Joker was a hit right from the start, making $96.2 million during it's opening weekend in early October

Box office hit: Joker was a hit right from the start, making $96.2 million during it's opening weekend in early October

Box office hit: Joker was a hit right from the start, making $96.2 million during it’s opening weekend in early October

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