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Endurance athlete sets new world record after running 196 marathons across every nation in 22 months

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A banker turned endurance athlete has set a new world record after running 196 marathons in every nation on earth in just 22 months.

Nick Butter, 30, quit banking and embarked on an expedition in January last year after being inspired by a friend who had cancer.

He has been through ten passports and covered 5,130 miles in organised events across seven continents, including the Sahara Desert and Antarctica.  

Nick Butter, 30, has set a new world record after running 96 marathons in every nation on earth in just 22 months. Today he completed the final event - the Authentic Marathon in Athens, Greece

Nick Butter, 30, has set a new world record after running 96 marathons in every nation on earth in just 22 months. Today he completed the final event - the Authentic Marathon in Athens, Greece

Nick Butter, 30, has set a new world record after running 96 marathons in every nation on earth in just 22 months. Today he completed the final event – the Authentic Marathon in Athens, Greece

Nick's final marathon with the man who inspired him Kevin Webber (centre). He got to know him over a five-day event when Mr Webber revealed he had terminal cancer

Nick's final marathon with the man who inspired him Kevin Webber (centre). He got to know him over a five-day event when Mr Webber revealed he had terminal cancer

Nick’s final marathon with the man who inspired him Kevin Webber (centre). He got to know him over a five-day event when Mr Webber revealed he had terminal cancer

On average Nick has completed three marathons in three new countries every week for the last 96 weeks.

This means he burned an estimated 1.5 million calories in 5.1 million steps during the 675-day adventure. 

And in the process has been through 120 Visas, hit by a car, bitten by a dog, broken his elbow and even been shot at.

He completed the final event in the Authentic Marathon in Athens, Greece, today, and hopes to raise £250,000 for Prostate Cancer UK.

Nick is pictured running with children in Naimey, in the west African country of Niger. He has said: 'You don't know when you're time is going to run out, so get out there and chase your dreams today - as Kevin said, don't wait for the diagnosis'

Nick is pictured running with children in Naimey, in the west African country of Niger. He has said: 'You don't know when you're time is going to run out, so get out there and chase your dreams today - as Kevin said, don't wait for the diagnosis'

Nick is pictured running with children in Naimey, in the west African country of Niger. He has said: ‘You don’t know when you’re time is going to run out, so get out there and chase your dreams today – as Kevin said, don’t wait for the diagnosis’

Nick, from Dorset, described his travels as ‘the most incredible experience’ as he has ‘seen things you wouldn’t even imagine possible’. 

While it took two years of planning and appeared initially ‘daunting’, he revealed how ‘eyeopening’ it was. He lived in airports and and hotel rooms as he made his global travels.

Nick has made around 2,000 new phone contacts from people he met across the world – and claimed they were the ‘best part’ of his experience        

He is pictured running in Nepal and believes 'the idea of teaching kids about things like a Nepalese prayer wheel is just amazing'. The former banker has two books planned to be released in 2020 and a 1,000 day running expedition in the pipeline for 2021

He is pictured running in Nepal and believes 'the idea of teaching kids about things like a Nepalese prayer wheel is just amazing'. The former banker has two books planned to be released in 2020 and a 1,000 day running expedition in the pipeline for 2021

He is pictured running in Nepal and believes ‘the idea of teaching kids about things like a Nepalese prayer wheel is just amazing’. The former banker has two books planned to be released in 2020 and a 1,000 day running expedition in the pipeline for 2021

Nick poses for a photo in a UN compound in Somalia during his travels which saw him get through ten passports. He got 201 flights covering 13,500 miles between countries, along with 45 train journeys, 15 buses and 280 taxis, on his adventure

Nick poses for a photo in a UN compound in Somalia during his travels which saw him get through ten passports. He got 201 flights covering 13,500 miles between countries, along with 45 train journeys, 15 buses and 280 taxis, on his adventure

Nick poses for a photo in a UN compound in Somalia during his travels which saw him get through ten passports. He got 201 flights covering 13,500 miles between countries, along with 45 train journeys, 15 buses and 280 taxis, on his adventure

He said: ‘Sure, the views I’ve seen have been breathtaking – but it’s the little kids running next to me wanting to hold my hand in some country I’ve never heard of before in Africa that has been the most amazing bit for me.

‘It’s gone so fast, yet at the same time feels like I’ve been doing it forever, it’s a weird reality and I can’t believe I’m at the finish line.’

The former banker, who has taken part in global marathons, met fellow runner Kevin Webber in 2016 during the Marathon Des Sables in Morocco. He got to know him over a five-day event when Mr Webber revealed he had terminal cancer.

He jogs along a rain-soaked road in Nepal in a group during his global adventure and while he says the views were breathtaking, it was the people he met which was the 'best part'

He jogs along a rain-soaked road in Nepal in a group during his global adventure and while he says the views were breathtaking, it was the people he met which was the 'best part'

He jogs along a rain-soaked road in Nepal in a group during his global adventure and while he says the views were breathtaking, it was the people he met which was the ‘best part’

Mr Webber, who was diagnosed two years earlier, took part in marathons to raise money for Prostate Cancer UK  

And when he told Kevin ‘don’t wait for the diagnosis’, this ‘struck a chord’ and ‘knew’ he had raise money for the charity. 

‘Kevin changed my life that day and in the months that followed, I quit my job at the bank and swapped my suit for running shorts forever.’

The athlete, from Dorset, snaps a quick selfie during the London Marathon in April this year

The athlete, from Dorset, snaps a quick selfie during the London Marathon in April this year

The athlete, from Dorset, snaps a quick selfie during the London Marathon in April this year

He stands in a group of people wearing Prostate Cancer UK vests in Athens, as he embarks on the Authentic Marathon in Greece's capital. Since setting off on his travels, he has raised a further £63,000 for Prostate Cancer UK on his Just Giving page as well as about £20,000 in external donations

He stands in a group of people wearing Prostate Cancer UK vests in Athens, as he embarks on the Authentic Marathon in Greece's capital. Since setting off on his travels, he has raised a further £63,000 for Prostate Cancer UK on his Just Giving page as well as about £20,000 in external donations

He stands in a group of people wearing Prostate Cancer UK vests in Athens, as he embarks on the Authentic Marathon in Greece’s capital. Since setting off on his travels, he has raised a further £63,000 for Prostate Cancer UK on his Just Giving page as well as about £20,000 in external donations

He motivated Nick to ‘get out there’ and do what he is ‘really passionate about whilst raising money for charity’.  

Nick raised an initial £46,000 in donations to cover his costs and started his adventure running in -25 degrees Celsius in snowy Toronto, Canada in January 2018. 

He took 201 flights covering 13,500 miles between countries, along with 45 train journeys, 15 buses and 280 taxis.

Since setting off he has raised a further £63,000 for Prostate Cancer UK on his Just Giving page as well as about £20,000 in external donations.

The endurance athlete jumps into the air for a playful picture in front of a pyramid in Egypt

The endurance athlete jumps into the air for a playful picture in front of a pyramid in Egypt

The endurance athlete jumps into the air for a playful picture in front of a pyramid in Egypt

Slide me

Nick is seen sprinting along an empty road in Malawi and pictured right, in Lesotho, south Africa

With two books planned to be released in 2020 and a 1,000 day running expedition in the pipeline for 2021, Nick has set himself up for a busy return to his home in Dorset.

Set to run the circumference of Iceland in July 2020, he’s not hanging up his running shoes just yet and is embarking on a speaking tour to inspire others to follow their dreams. 

‘I’ve learnt so much about other countries and cultures throughout my journey, and the idea of teaching kids about things like a Nepalese prayer wheel is just amazing to me.

Pictured in headphones, Nick goes for a jog along the waterfront in New Zealand. And today he is continuing to raise money for Prostate Cancer UK

Pictured in headphones, Nick goes for a jog along the waterfront in New Zealand. And today he is continuing to raise money for Prostate Cancer UK

Pictured in headphones, Nick goes for a jog along the waterfront in New Zealand. And today he is continuing to raise money for Prostate Cancer UK

‘The average human lives for 29,747 days, and if you’re British, you spend about 9 years watching television, so it’s interesting to get people thinking about how much time you waste not doing something you’re truly passionate about.

‘You don’t know when you’re time is going to run out, so get out there and chase your dreams today – as Kevin said, don’t wait for the diagnosis.’

Nick is continuing to raise money for Prostate Cancer UK and has a Just Giving page set up to help him reach his £250,000 target.

 

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Mother, 66, buys local train ticket office with dreams to transform it into a three-bedroom home 

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A mother will buy her local train ticket office and attempt to turn it into a three-bedroom home.

Susan Harris, 66, caught the train from Llandaff station, Cardiff, for days out as a child but the station office stopped being used in the 1980s and later fell into disrepair.

The ticket office has a partially collapsed roof and is covered in debris, but Mrs Harris will attempt to tackle the challenging project. 

Susan Harris, 66, will buy her local train ticket office and attempt to turn it into a three-bedroom home. She caught the train from Llandaff station, Cardiff, for days out as a child

Susan Harris, 66, will buy her local train ticket office and attempt to turn it into a three-bedroom home. She caught the train from Llandaff station, Cardiff, for days out as a child

Susan Harris, 66, will buy her local train ticket office and attempt to turn it into a three-bedroom home. She caught the train from Llandaff station, Cardiff, for days out as a child

She said: ‘We used to come here to collect our tickets to go to Barry Island on the train during the summer holidays with my mum.

‘That’s how I knew the ticket office so when I saw it come up for sale I was like ‘I know that building from somewhere’ and then I did a little bit of research and oh my Lord it was the ticket office.

‘I just fell in love with it. It’s a quaint building, I’ll kid you not.’ 

Mrs Harris hopes the ticket office, pictured above next to the railway platform, will appeal to a keen trainspotter when she comes to selling it. The office stopped being used in the 1980s

Mrs Harris hopes the ticket office, pictured above next to the railway platform, will appeal to a keen trainspotter when she comes to selling it. The office stopped being used in the 1980s

Mrs Harris hopes the ticket office, pictured above next to the railway platform, will appeal to a keen trainspotter when she comes to selling it. The office stopped being used in the 1980s

The building is still in the process of being converted. Graffiti is pictured scrawled on the derelict Victorian ticket office which later fell into disrepair

The building is still in the process of being converted. Graffiti is pictured scrawled on the derelict Victorian ticket office which later fell into disrepair

The building is still in the process of being converted. Graffiti is pictured scrawled on the derelict Victorian ticket office which later fell into disrepair

Debris is pictured scattered around the building. It has a partially collapsed roof and is covered in debris, but Mrs Harris will attempt to tackle the challenging project

Debris is pictured scattered around the building. It has a partially collapsed roof and is covered in debris, but Mrs Harris will attempt to tackle the challenging project

Debris is pictured scattered around the building. It has a partially collapsed roof and is covered in debris, but Mrs Harris will attempt to tackle the challenging project

Mrs Harris, whose family runs a construction company, said: ‘The neighbours been very supportive and they really love it. They are pleased that we are doing something with the building.

‘It was an eyesore for a long time but when you look at it now, it’s coming back to life and they love it. The local interest has been phenomenal.’ 

The Victorian building sits between the suburbs of Llandaff North and Whitchurch, and was a key part of Isambard Kindom Brunel’s Taff Vale Railway.

She added: ‘It’s a quirky little property; I could live here. It would be cruel to carve it up into two properties as was once planned; splitting it in half – for me it didn’t lend itself to that. It had to be a house.’

The building is still in the process of being converted. Mrs Harris hopes the ticket office will appeal to a keen trainspotter when she comes to selling it.

She added: ‘I think the eventual buyer will be someone who falls in love with it, as I did.’

The Victorian building sits between the suburbs of Llandaff North and Whitchurch, and was a key part of Isambard Kindom Brunel's Taff Vale Railway. A room is pictured being renovated, above

The Victorian building sits between the suburbs of Llandaff North and Whitchurch, and was a key part of Isambard Kindom Brunel's Taff Vale Railway. A room is pictured being renovated, above

The Victorian building sits between the suburbs of Llandaff North and Whitchurch, and was a key part of Isambard Kindom Brunel’s Taff Vale Railway. A room is pictured being renovated, above

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High street bakers Greggs encourages customers to swap jam-filled doughnuts for the ring variety

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Greggs has pledged to join the fight against obesity by encouraging customers to buy ‘diet’ doughnuts with a hole instead of the jam variety.

The high street bakery said it will encourage customers to make healthier choices by changing their displays so that jam-filled doughnuts are surrounded by ring doughnuts. 

It is in a bid to make healthy eating ‘top of its corporate social responsibility agenda’ and push people to eat slightly smaller cakes. 

Speaking at a childhood obesity conference in London, Greggs’ chief executive Roger Whiteside said the hole in the middle as well as the lack of jam means they have fewer calories.

The high street bakery Greggs has said it will encourage customers to make healthier choices. Pictured: a jam doughnut 

Greggs' chief executive Roger Whiteside said the hole in the middle as well as the lack of jam means ring doughnuts (pictured) have fewer calories

Greggs' chief executive Roger Whiteside said the hole in the middle as well as the lack of jam means ring doughnuts (pictured) have fewer calories

Greggs’ chief executive Roger Whiteside said the hole in the middle as well as the lack of jam means ring doughnuts (pictured) have fewer calories

Mr Whiteside told The Sunday Times: ‘The ring doughnuts are between 200 and 300 calories, the ball doughnuts are between 300 and 400 calories.

‘People like big cakes, not little cakes. We know that we shouldn’t be encouraging people to eat large cakes but the problem is you have to go with demand.’ 

The ring doughnut vs the jam doughnut

Ring: 

Weight: 58 grams 

Calories: 191

Price: 55p

Sugar: 13 grams

Fat: 6.4 grams

 

Jam:

Weight: 73 grams 

Calories: 245

Price:  65p

Sugar: 12 grams

Fat: 10 grams

The move is in response to a new government childhood obesity strategy, which will see the food and drinks industry working towards a 20 per cent reduction in the sugar used in products popular with children, such as sugary drinks.

Greggs spokeswoman Wendy Baker said that the bakery chain was ‘serious about customer health’.

She said: ‘A wider choice of ring doughnuts has been introduced which range from 190 to 260 calories, compared to traditional fondant doughnuts which range from 225 to 340 calories. 

‘Greggs has also reduced sugar by 20 per cent across its sweet range.’

Tim Lang, professor of food policy at City, University of London, said the move was ‘a bit of a joke’ and that actually Greggs’ total calorie output is growing. 

The decision comes after the bakery chain brought out a vegan sausage roll last year which became hugely popular with customers.  

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‘We are going to slaughter you’: Syrian camp full of ISIS brides has turned into a ‘mini caliphate’

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A camp full of ISIS brides and their children has turned into a ‘mini caliphate’ despite the death of its leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi in a US raid last month.

More than 70,000 people, mostly women and children, are kept at al Hol in northeast Syria and thousands of them are suspected ISIS brides and their children.

The Turkish invasion has depleted the Kurdish guards. Stabbings are common and there have been several murders.

‘We’re going to kill you by slaughtering you. We will slaughter you.’ A ten-year-old boy told Sky News. ‘God says, “Turn to Allah with sincere repentance in the hope that your Lord will remove you from your ills.”‘ 

'We're going to kill you by slaughtering you. We will slaughter you.' A ten-year-old boy says. 'God says, "Turn to Allah with sincere repentance in the hope that your Lord will remove you from your ills."'

'We're going to kill you by slaughtering you. We will slaughter you.' A ten-year-old boy says. 'God says, "Turn to Allah with sincere repentance in the hope that your Lord will remove you from your ills."'

‘We’re going to kill you by slaughtering you. We will slaughter you.’ A ten-year-old boy says. ‘God says, “Turn to Allah with sincere repentance in the hope that your Lord will remove you from your ills.”‘

A French citizen holding a child by the hand at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State on October 17

A French citizen holding a child by the hand at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State on October 17

A French citizen holding a child by the hand at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State on October 17

A woman walks near tents at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State foreign fighters are held, in the al-Hasakeh governorate in northeastern Syria last month

A woman walks near tents at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State foreign fighters are held, in the al-Hasakeh governorate in northeastern Syria last month

A woman walks near tents at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State foreign fighters are held, in the al-Hasakeh governorate in northeastern Syria last month

Children, many of them European, walk through the squalid camp with nobody but their radicalised mothers to seek guidance from.

Many of the women refused to talk to the broadcaster, others were strident in their convictions.

Asked what she thought of Baghdadi’s death, one woman dressed in the black niqab shrieked: ‘The Islamic State is remaining! The Islamic State is remaining!’

Another, from Paris, seemed equally unfazed, telling Sky News: ‘We believed in him so we came [to the caliphate] … And here we are. Anyway he is dead. You know in Islam there is life after death. Another one will return.’

Asked whether the Islamic State would return, she replied: ‘God willing.’  

Not far from al Hol many thousands of former ISIS fighters are held in cramped jails by the Kurds.   

Mark Stone, of Sky News, reported from al Hol: 'The place is the perfect incubator for the reformation of IS. Essentially the camp already represents a new mini caliphate'

Mark Stone, of Sky News, reported from al Hol: 'The place is the perfect incubator for the reformation of IS. Essentially the camp already represents a new mini caliphate'

Mark Stone, of Sky News, reported from al Hol: ‘The place is the perfect incubator for the reformation of IS. Essentially the camp already represents a new mini caliphate’

Children, many of them European, walk through the squalid camp with nobody but their radicalised mothers to seek guidance from

Children, many of them European, walk through the squalid camp with nobody but their radicalised mothers to seek guidance from

Children, many of them European, walk through the squalid camp with nobody but their radicalised mothers to seek guidance from

The al Hol camp was supposed to be a temporary solution after the collapse of Islamic State but there is no plan for what to do with the people

The al Hol camp was supposed to be a temporary solution after the collapse of Islamic State but there is no plan for what to do with the people

The al Hol camp was supposed to be a temporary solution after the collapse of Islamic State but there is no plan for what to do with the people

Just days after the Turkish invasion, the Kurds said hundreds of ISIS brides and their children escaped from another camp in a town called Ain Issa near the border.

Several other reports have emerged of IS-linked men escaping jails.

The al Hol camp was supposed to be a temporary solution after the collapse of Islamic State but there is no plan for what to do with the people. 

Inside the encampment, Kurdish security forces patrol between the tents, a gun slung over their shoulder.

Laundry hangs on clothing lines strung up between the canvas dwellings, while barefoot children play in the dirt.

In a special fenced-off section of the camp for foreigners, security is tight, with cameras surveying the movements of residents from its edges.

Mark Stone, of Sky News, reported: ‘The place is the perfect incubator for the reformation of IS. Essentially the camp already represents a new mini caliphate.’ 

In the foreign section the guard said there were around 10,000 people, though no accurate records exist.

Women look after children at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State (IS) foreign fighters are held, in the al-Hasakeh governorate in northeastern Syria, on October 17

Women look after children at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State (IS) foreign fighters are held, in the al-Hasakeh governorate in northeastern Syria, on October 17

Women look after children at the Kurdish-run al-Hol camp for the displaced where families of Islamic State (IS) foreign fighters are held, in the al-Hasakeh governorate in northeastern Syria, on October 17

Sky News met women and children from Australia, Finland, Russia, Bosnia, France, China and Uzbekistan

Sky News met women and children from Australia, Finland, Russia, Bosnia, France, China and Uzbekistan

Sky News met women and children from Australia, Finland, Russia, Bosnia, France, China and Uzbekistan

Sky News met women and children from Australia, Finland, Russia, Bosnia, France, China and Uzbekistan.

IS declared a caliphate across large swathes of Syria and Iraq in 2014, before Kurdish-led fighters declared their territorial defeat this spring.

But US President Donald Trump last month ordered the withdrawal of US troops who had been helping the Kurds fight remaining IS sleeper cells, leaving them exposed to a Turkish attack.

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