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Gin shop bans all cheesy Christmas songs to boost the morale of staff

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A gin shop has banned cheesy Christmas songs over the festive period to boost the morale of staff forced to listen to them. 

The York Gin shop, in the heart of the historic city, will not be playing Mariah Carey‘s All I Want For Christmas Is You or Slade’s Merry Xmas Everybody, as it said it would ruin Christmas for shop floor staff who have to endure the music for eight hours each day.

Emma Godivala, director of York Gin, also claimed the move would be welcomed by shoppers who are subjected to a constant playlist of festive hits from mid-November.

The York Gin shop, in the heart of the historic city, will not be playing Mariah Carey's All I Want For Christmas Is You or Slade's Merry Xmas Everybody

The York Gin shop, in the heart of the historic city, will not be playing Mariah Carey's All I Want For Christmas Is You or Slade's Merry Xmas Everybody

The York Gin shop, in the heart of the historic city, will not be playing Mariah Carey’s All I Want For Christmas Is You or Slade’s Merry Xmas Everybody

Emma Godivala, director of York Gin, also said shop, based in a 16th century Tudor building, does not suit modern music

Emma Godivala, director of York Gin, also said shop, based in a 16th century Tudor building, does not suit modern music

Emma Godivala, director of York Gin, also said shop, based in a 16th century Tudor building, does not suit modern music

Most high street shops have the Christmas decorations up and the festive songs playing long before December 25.

Ms Godivala also said shop, based in a 16th century Tudor building, does not suit modern music.

She said: ‘We do love Christmas, but we want our gin shop to be a cheese-free zone.

‘We’ve tested lots of songs to see which sound okay and which sound weird. And there’s a cut-off in the 1960s. Anything after that has been banned.

‘Our lovely team are happy with the decision – they say lots of other shop staff are already going stir crazy with the same Christmas hits being played on a loop.

Instead the shop will play Christmas carols, seasonal ballets such as The Nutcracker and classics from Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald

Instead the shop will play Christmas carols, seasonal ballets such as The Nutcracker and classics from Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald

Instead the shop will play Christmas carols, seasonal ballets such as The Nutcracker and classics from Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald

‘That said, if Mariah appeared in the shop, we might just overturn the ban for a while and play All I Want For Christmas Is You.’

Instead the shop will play Christmas carols, seasonal ballets such as The Nutcracker and classics from Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald.

Shop manager Sandie Tanner-Smith said: ‘We’re confident we’ll have the happiest staff and customers around – our playlist is big enough to make sure no-one hears the same Christmas song more than twice in a week.’

Pictured left to right: Flo Poskitt, Alexandra Mather, Jo Hird (all York Gin team & cast crew of Scrooge The Musical), with Sandie Tanner-Smith, York Gin shop Manager (Right) - who is also stage-managing Scrooge

Pictured left to right: Flo Poskitt, Alexandra Mather, Jo Hird (all York Gin team & cast crew of Scrooge The Musical), with Sandie Tanner-Smith, York Gin shop Manager (Right) - who is also stage-managing Scrooge

Pictured left to right: Flo Poskitt, Alexandra Mather, Jo Hird (all York Gin team & cast crew of Scrooge The Musical), with Sandie Tanner-Smith, York Gin shop Manager (Right) – who is also stage-managing Scrooge

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Jem Wolfe: Instagram model tells No Jumper ‘influencers are not respected’ in Perth, Australia

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A curvy Instagram model who’s collected more than 2.7 million followers by posting racy photos and videos of herself has complained her profession is ‘not seen as a real career’ in Australia.  

Jem Wolfie, 28, has made more than $2 million from her social media accounts, where she shares modelling shots, fitness inspiration and healthy eating tips – usually wearing a bikini, lingerie or fitness bras. 

However, despite her claimed financial success and social media fame, Wolfie told the Los Angeles podcast No Jumper ‘no influencers are respected’ back in the ‘small town’ of Perth

Wolfie said her home city was ‘so behind the times … no influencers are respected there. What I do is sort of laughed at there. 

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'Not seen as a real career': Jem Wolfie reportedly rakes in as much as $30,000 a day... but says her Instagram influencing profession is 'not seen as a real career' back home in Perth

'Not seen as a real career': Jem Wolfie reportedly rakes in as much as $30,000 a day... but says her Instagram influencing profession is 'not seen as a real career' back home in Perth

‘Not seen as a real career’: Jem Wolfie reportedly rakes in as much as $30,000 a day… but says her Instagram influencing profession is ‘not seen as a real career’ back home in Perth

Wolfie was a full-time chef working '14 hour days' and a competitive basketballer when her second career - social media - began to take off

Wolfie was a full-time chef working '14 hour days' and a competitive basketballer when her second career - social media - began to take off

Wolfie said her home city of Perth was 'so behind the times ... no influencers are respected there. What I do is sort of laughed at there.

Wolfie said her home city of Perth was 'so behind the times ... no influencers are respected there. What I do is sort of laughed at there.

Wolfie was a full-time chef working ’14 hour days’ and a competitive basketballer when her second career – social media – began to take off

‘If I’m ever in the headlines, the comments section is wild … it’s like, ‘we’re embarrassed to have you, Jem’.’ 

Her comments surprised host Adam Grandmaison, who said Insta-models were treated ‘like gold’ in Los Angeles, and that influencing was a respected career there. 

Wolfie replied: ‘Yeah, it’s not a real career where I’m from, believe me. But that’s OK, because I don’t need, like, validation from anyone for what I do.’ 

She said Sydney and Melbourne were home to more influencers who had built full-time careers out of social media, but she never wanted to leave her family and rescue dogs behind in Perth. 

Wolfie said: 'It's not a real career where I'm from, believe me. But that's OK, because I don't need like validation from anyone for what I do.'

Wolfie said: 'It's not a real career where I'm from, believe me. But that's OK, because I don't need like validation from anyone for what I do.'

Wolfie said: ‘It’s not a real career where I’m from, believe me. But that’s OK, because I don’t need like validation from anyone for what I do.’

Wolfie is one of the biggest stars on 'OnlyFans', where 10,000 followers pay $15 a month for access to her 'exclusive content' - which doesn't include nudity

Wolfie is one of the biggest stars on 'OnlyFans', where 10,000 followers pay $15 a month for access to her 'exclusive content' - which doesn't include nudity

Wolfie is one of the biggest stars on ‘OnlyFans’, where 10,000 followers pay $15 a month for access to her ‘exclusive content’ – which doesn’t include nudity

Wolfie was a full-time chef and competitive West Australia Basketball League player prior to her career in social media. 

She discovered the potential of social media while nursing an injury, posting videos of her rehabilitation at the gym. She now sells e-books, merchandise and recipes online. 

Wolfie is also the biggest star on a subscription-based platform, OnlyFans. She reportedly rakes as much as $30,000-a-day from the service. 

As many as 10,000 fans pay a $15 monthly fee for her ‘exclusive content’, which includes steamy photos, but not nudity. 

‘With Instagram becoming more and more strict with what can be posted sign up here for no restrictions,’ her OnlyFans account says.

Wolfie, above, speaks to Adam Grandmaison for the Los Angeles-based 'No Jumper' podcast

Wolfie, above, speaks to Adam Grandmaison for the Los Angeles-based 'No Jumper' podcast

Wolfie, above, speaks to Adam Grandmaison for the Los Angeles-based ‘No Jumper’ podcast 

However, Wolfie has admitted that social media fame comes with its downsides, previously telling LADBible she cops daily abuse on Instagram.  

‘The worst thing is waking up every day and seeing comments and messages that are really horrible,’ she said this year. 

‘Some days it can be draining when you’re constantly called fat. 

‘It can be exhausting to have negativity constantly shoved down your throat every day.’ 

JEM WOLFIE: FROM CHEF TO INTERNET SENSATION 

Wolfie has won sponsorships from brands including Kanye West's recording label, Atlantic Records

Wolfie has won sponsorships from brands including Kanye West's recording label, Atlantic Records

Wolfie has won sponsorships from brands including Kanye West’s recording label, Atlantic Records

Jem Wolfie discovered her knack for social media when a sport injury derailed her career as a compteitive basketballer.

Wolfie, 28 posted ‘fitspo’ videos of her rehabilitation online, most of it at the gym.

‘There are a lot of squats, I know what my audience wants to see. You can never skip leg day,’ she told PerthNow. 

By 2015, she had close to 10,000 followers. Four years later, she has a follower base 270 times that large.  

Her basketball tricks and healthy recipes – she was an apprentice chef – helped her gain a legion of followers and picque the interest of sponsors. 

As did her scantily dressed photos and videos. She has more than 10,000 fans on the subscription platform, OnlyFans, but does not share nude pictures. 

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Dog that mauled a dachshund named Coco to death won’t be put down after online petition

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The Staffy who mauled a dachshund to death will not be put down, the council has said. 

A spokesperson from Cardinia Council, in Victoria, said ‘no further action’ will be taken against ‘Hero’ after more than 200,000 people signed an online petition calling for the dog to be saved. 

Kashila Chintamunnee, from Pakenham, Victoria, told how Hero killed her dachshund Coco after he escaped and ran into a park on Windemere Blvd on November 5.

But Hero’s owner Claudia Harrison said three dogs including Coco, another daschund and a Labrador approached her, frightening her son and attacking her Staffy.  

A petition calling for the council not to put down Hero (pictured) has received more than 200,000 signatures

A petition calling for the council not to put down Hero (pictured) has received more than 200,000 signatures

A petition calling for the council not to put down Hero (pictured) has received more than 200,000 signatures 

‘The other smaller dogs were attacking my dog and they kept snapping at him, that’s when he got hold of one of them and I couldn’t get him off,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.   

CCTV footage seen by Ten News appeared to back up Ms Harrison’s version of events, showing the three dogs off their leashes and running over to her. 

Ms Harrison’s lawyer Michael Faltermaier told the Cranbourne Leader: ‘He is indeed a hero and had to act to protect his owners.’

Kashila Chintamunnee said her dog Coco (pictured) escaped from her home in Melbourne and was mauled to death by as Staffy in a local park

Kashila Chintamunnee said her dog Coco (pictured) escaped from her home in Melbourne and was mauled to death by as Staffy in a local park

Kashila Chintamunnee said her dog Coco (pictured) escaped from her home in Melbourne and was mauled to death by as Staffy in a local park

Coco was then killed by Hero (pictured with owner Claudia Harrison) which was photographed covered in blood in the aftermath of the fight

Coco was then killed by Hero (pictured with owner Claudia Harrison) which was photographed covered in blood in the aftermath of the fight

Coco was then killed by Hero (pictured with owner Claudia Harrison) which was photographed covered in blood in the aftermath of the fight 

‘Justice for Hero has been achieved,’ Mr Faltermaier said. 

Ms Harrison previously said she was forced to grab her six-year-old son and jump on a picnic table to avoid the dogs while Hero, who was on a leash, defended himself.

She said she tried to call out for someone to help her when she noticed a car come out of the house across the road. 

‘The owners didn’t realise the dogs had escaped and I told them to get a bucket of water because I couldn’t get my dog off [the other dog],’ she said.

The attack left blood spattered across a pathway in the park in Pakenham near Melbourne

The attack left blood spattered across a pathway in the park in Pakenham near Melbourne

The attack left blood spattered across a pathway in the park in Pakenham near Melbourne 

Mrs Harrison (pictured with her husband, Paki) told Daily Mail Australia she was taking her dog for a walk with her six-year-old son when three dogs came up behind her

Mrs Harrison (pictured with her husband, Paki) told Daily Mail Australia she was taking her dog for a walk with her six-year-old son when three dogs came up behind her

Mrs Harrison (pictured with her husband, Paki) told Daily Mail Australia she was taking her dog for a walk with her six-year-old son when three dogs came up behind her

The mother said that all she was trying to do was protect her son, which is what she was telling Ms Chintamunnee when they took a photo of her and the bloodied dog.

Ms Harrison said she felt sorry for Ms Chintamunnee but that she was just trying to protect her son and her dog.

By the time Ms Chintamunnee arrived, it was too late to save Coco.

'You will truly be missed my beautiful baby Coco, no words could ever describe how beautiful and loving you were,' Ms Chintamunnee said

'You will truly be missed my beautiful baby Coco, no words could ever describe how beautiful and loving you were,' Ms Chintamunnee said

‘You will truly be missed my beautiful baby Coco, no words could ever describe how beautiful and loving you were,’ Ms Chintamunnee said 

Kashila Chintamunnee posted images showing her clothes and body covered in blood from trying to save her dog

Kashila Chintamunnee posted images showing her clothes and body covered in blood from trying to save her dog

Kashila Chintamunnee posted images showing her clothes and body covered in blood from trying to save her dog

Ms Chintamunnee posted photos of her clothes and body covered in blood on Facebook, saying she battled in vain to save her pet.

She told the Cranbourne Leader that her dog had ‘sniffed’ the other dog when it escaped from her house. 

‘My father opened our gate and Coco ran outside and had a sniff of the other dog… and he started mauling my dog,’ she said.

‘The dog had bitten too deep into Coco’s main vessel as he had lost that much blood – I was drenched in his blood that’s how much there was.’

 Mr Faltermaier said that his client was deeply saddened by the death of Coco and the incident was a reminder to keep an eye on children and pets at ‘all times’.

Belinda Shipp, who started the Save Hero petition and Facebook page, said the sheer number of supporters had saved the dog.

‘This is why we started the page so everyone could show their love and support in one place, by posting pictures of their dogs and hash tagging #savehero,’ Ms Shipp said.

In just five hours, the petition to save Hero had received almost 15,000 signatures

In just five hours, the petition to save Hero had received almost 15,000 signatures

In just five hours, the petition to save Hero had received almost 15,000 signatures

Coco was buried in the family's backyard, covered in red roses, so the beloved dog would always be with them

Coco was buried in the family's backyard, covered in red roses, so the beloved dog would always be with them

Coco was buried in the family’s backyard, covered in red roses, so the beloved dog would always be with them

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The study that shows why Donald and Melania Trump are a perfect match

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It has long been believed that when it come to the opposite sex, men always focus on looks.

Now researchers have backed up the theory – finding men place 27 per cent more importance on looks, while women prioritise social status by a similar margin.

In news that may interest US President Donald Trump, 73, and his former catwalk model wife Melania, 49, researchers asked study participants to allocate 100 ‘relationship dollars’ on five qualities in a partner – physical attractiveness, social status, kindness, liveliness and creativity. 

Research conducted by teams from Glasgow University and East China Normal University have discovered that men show a greater preference for physical attractiveness compared to men (Pictured: President Donald Trump

Research conducted by teams from Glasgow University and East China Normal University have discovered that men show a greater preference for physical attractiveness compared to men (Pictured: President Donald Trump

Research conducted by teams from Glasgow University and East China Normal University have discovered that men show a greater preference for physical attractiveness compared to men (Pictured: President Donald Trump 

President Donald Trump listens as first lady Melania Trump speaks in June, 2019. The study found that men find looks 27 per cent more important, while women prioritise social standing by a similar margin

President Donald Trump listens as first lady Melania Trump speaks in June, 2019. The study found that men find looks 27 per cent more important, while women prioritise social standing by a similar margin

President Donald Trump listens as first lady Melania Trump speaks in June, 2019. The study found that men find looks 27 per cent more important, while women prioritise social standing by a similar margin  

Teams from Glasgow University and East China Normal University questioned 99 UK women, 113 UK men, 120 Chinese women and 142 Chinese men, aged between 16 and 30.

In long-term relationships, UK men rated looks as 27 per cent more important than women did. Findings among Chinese men were similar. 

Meanwhile, UK women placed a 27 per cent higher value on social status than men did.

Writing in the Royal Society Open Science journal, the authors said the findings confirmed their prediction that ‘men in both samples would show stronger preferences for physical attractiveness than women did’.

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