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Google brings its Jacquard wearables tech to Levi’s Trucker Jacket

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Back in 2015, Google’s ATAP team demoed a new kind of wearable tech at Google I/O that used functional fabrics and conductive yarns to allow you to interact with your clothing and, by extension, the phone in your pocket. The company then released a jacket with Levi’s in 2017, but that was expensive, at $350, and never really quite caught on. Now, however, Jacquard is back. A few weeks ago, Saint Laurent launched a backpack with Jacquard support, but at $1,000, that was very much a luxury product. Today, however, Google and Levi’s are announcing their latest collaboration: Jacquard-enabled versions of Levi’s Trucker Jacket.

These jackets, which will come in different styles, including the Classic Trucker and the Sherpa Trucker, and in men’s and women’s versions, will retail for $198 for the Classic Trucker and $248 for the Sherpa Trucker. In addition to the U.S., it’ll be available in Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the U.K.

The idea here is simple and hasn’t changed since the original launch: a dongle in your jacket’s cuff connects to conductive yarns in your jacket. You can then swipe over your cuff, tap it or hold your hand over it to issue commands to your phone. You use the Jacquard phone app for iOS or Android to set up what each gesture does, with commands ranging from saving your location to bringing up the Google Assistant in your headphones, from skipping to the next song to controlling your camera for selfies or simply counting things during the day, like the coffees you drink on the go. If you have Bose noise-canceling headphones, the app also lets you set a gesture to turn your noise cancellation on or off. In total, there are currently 19 abilities available, and the dongle also includes a vibration motor for notifications.

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What’s maybe most important, though, is that this (re-)launch sets up Jacquard as a more modular technology that Google and its partners hope will take it from a bit of a gimmick to something you’ll see in more places over the next few months and years.

“Since we launched the first product with Levi’s at the end of 2017, we were focused on trying to understand and working really hard on how we can take the technology from a single product […] to create a real technology platform that can be used by multiple brands and by multiple collaborators,” Ivan Poupyrev, the head of Jacquard by Google told me. He noted that the idea behind projects like Jacquard is to take things we use every day, like backpacks, jackets and shoes, and make them better with technology. He argued that, for the most part, technology hasn’t really been added to these things that we use every day. He wants to work with companies like Levi’s to “give people the opportunity to create new digital touchpoints to their digital life through things they already have and own and use every day.”

What’s also important about Jacquard 2.0 is that you can take the dongle from garment to garment. For the original jacket, the dongle only worked with this one specific type of jacket; now, you’ll be able to take it with you and use it in other wearables as well. The dongle, too, is significantly smaller and more powerful. It also now has more memory to support multiple products. Yet, in my own testing, its battery still lasts for a few days of occasional use, with plenty of standby time.

jacquard dongle

Poupyrev also noted that the team focused on reducing cost, “in order to bring the technology into a price range where it’s more attractive to consumers.” The team also made lots of changes to the software that runs on the device and, more importantly, in the cloud to allow it to configure itself for every product it’s being used in and to make it easier for the team to add new functionality over time (when was the last time your jacket got a software upgrade?).

He actually hopes that over time, people will forget that Google was involved in this. He wants the technology to fade into the background. Levi’s, on the other hand, obviously hopes that this technology will enable it to reach a new market. The 2017 version only included the Levi’s Commuter Trucker Jacket. Now, the company is going broader with different styles.

“We had gone out with a really sharp focus on trying to adapt the technology to meet the needs of our commuter customer, which a collection of Levi’s focused on urban cyclists,” Paul Dillinger, the VP of Global Product Innovation at Levi’s, told me when I asked him about the company’s original efforts around Jacquard. But there was a lot of interest beyond that community, he said, yet the built-in features were very much meant to serve the needs of this specific audience and not necessarily relevant to the lifestyles of other users. The jackets, of course, were also pretty expensive. “There was an appetite for the technology to do more and be more accessible,” he said — and the results of that work are these new jackets.

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Dillinger also noted that this changes the relationship his company has with the consumer, because Levi’s can now upgrade the technology in your jacket after you bought it. “This is a really new experience,” he said. “And it’s a completely different approach to fashion. The normal fashion promise from other companies really is that we promise that in six months, we’re going to try to sell you something else. Levi’s prides itself on creating enduring, lasting value in style and we are able to actually improve the value of the garment that was already in the consumer’s closet.”

I spent about a week with the Sherpa jacket before today’s launch. It does exactly what it promises to do. Pairing my phone and jacket took less than a minute and the connection between the two has been perfectly stable. The gesture recognition worked very well — maybe better than I expected. What it can do, it does well, and I appreciate that the team kept the functionality pretty narrow.

Whether Jacquard is for you may depend on your lifestyle, though. I think the ideal user is somebody who is out and about a lot, wearing headphones, given that music controls are one of the main features here. But you don’t have to be wearing headphones to get value out of Jacquard. I almost never wear headphones in public, but I used it to quickly tag where I parked my car, for example, and when I used it with headphones, I found using my jacket’s cuffs easier to forward to the next song than doing the same on my headphones. Your mileage may vary, of course, and while I like the idea of using this kind of tech so you need to take out your phone less often, I wonder if that ship hasn’t sailed at this point — and whether the controls on your headphones can’t do most of the things Jacquard can. Google surely wants Jacquard to be more than a gimmick, but at this stage, it kind of still is.

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Dad, 37, drank 24/7 at height of his addiction and ended up homeless – but is now a UK boxing champ

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A boxing champion whose drug and drink addiction saw him lose his house, family and job in just a few years has revealed how he was forced to live on the streets for six months before a brutal wake-up call finally changed his fortunes. 

UMA Fighter Ian Maddocks, 37, from Crewe, began smoking weed aged 11 to ‘fit in’ and quickly progressed onto harder drugs including cocaine and ecstasy.

Describing his younger self as a functioning alcoholic with a love for partying, dad-of-two Ian, who is partially deaf, managed to hold down a job at the Bentley factory in Crewe for ten years and even get a mortgage with his former partner before his life began to unravel after the birth of his second child. 

His descent into addiction took him to a life where he would ‘drink and pass out’ and saw him disowned by his family.  He found himself sleeping on the streets, where he says he was ‘ready’ to take heroin but was told to ‘think of your children’, a moment that kick-started his long, hard road back to sobriety.   

Ian Maddocks, 37, from Crewe, is the current UMA World Thai Gold boxing champion after being crowned earlier this year but just four years ago he was living on the streets of the north west after his life spiralled out of control due to a drink and cocaine addiction

Ian Maddocks, 37, from Crewe, is the current UMA World Thai Gold boxing champion after being crowned earlier this year but just four years ago he was living on the streets of the north west after his life spiralled out of control due to a drink and cocaine addiction

Ian Maddocks, 37, from Crewe, is the current UMA World Thai Gold boxing champion after being crowned earlier this year but just four years ago he was living on the streets of the north west after his life spiralled out of control due to a drink and cocaine addiction

Bloated: Ian pictured as he entered a detox programme that would eventually turn his life around. At his lowest point, he was forced to live on the streets after becoming trapped in a cycle of 'drinking to pass out' and becoming estranged from his family

Bloated: Ian pictured as he entered a detox programme that would eventually turn his life around. At his lowest point, he was forced to live on the streets after becoming trapped in a cycle of 'drinking to pass out' and becoming estranged from his family

Bloated: Ian pictured as he entered a detox programme that would eventually turn his life around. At his lowest point, he was forced to live on the streets after becoming trapped in a cycle of ‘drinking to pass out’ and becoming estranged from his family 

A dad again: Ian pictured with his two children Amelia, right, nine, and Jack, eight, left, in happier recent times. At the height of his addiction, he didn't see his children for six months and wasn't allowed to spend time alone with them when he did see them

A dad again: Ian pictured with his two children Amelia, right, nine, and Jack, eight, left, in happier recent times. At the height of his addiction, he didn't see his children for six months and wasn't allowed to spend time alone with them when he did see them

A dad again: Ian pictured with his two children Amelia, right, nine, and Jack, eight, left, in happier recent times. At the height of his addiction, he didn’t see his children for six months and wasn’t allowed to spend time alone with them when he did see them

Hardest decision: Ian with his mum Jacqueline who he moved in with for two weeks when his drinking was at its worst; when police escorted him from her home at her request, she found 197 empty bottles in his bedroom amassed over just 14 days

Hardest decision: Ian with his mum Jacqueline who he moved in with for two weeks when his drinking was at its worst; when police escorted him from her home at her request, she found 197 empty bottles in his bedroom amassed over just 14 days

Hardest decision: Ian with his mum Jacqueline who he moved in with for two weeks when his drinking was at its worst; when police escorted him from her home at her request, she found 197 empty bottles in his bedroom amassed over just 14 days 

Ian describes how his early childhood saw him bullied for his poor hearing and his ginger hair. His late grandfather, Steve Jones, decided to enroll him into martial arts classes to give him more confidence, a sport that he quickly got good at. 

He says: ‘People started to notice me and it went to my head a bit. I started bullying the bullies.’

Desperate to fit in with the cool crowd, Ian tells MailOnline that by his early teens, he’d already tried harder drugs and was taking ecstasy and speed at 16. 

I did go to Alcoholics Anonymous. There was a guy who told a story about ending up homeless, losing his family – and I just thought “I’m not even that bad”. It fuelled my denial.’ 
Ian Maddocks 

He says: ‘My family didn’t know, I got away with it for a long time. In my late teens and early twenties, I was partying all the time and I just thought “I’ll just do it every weekend”’. 

‘Looking back now, I’d drunk for most of my life, I was a functioning alcoholic for a long time.’

Becoming a father to Amelia, nine, when he was 27 made him stop taking cocaine but he struggled to control his drinking.  

Within months of his second child, Jack, now eight, being born in 2011, he was drinking heavily, often downing two glasses of wine before going to work at the Bentley factory to ‘take the edge off the working day’. 

He says: ‘It was drinking to function. I was waking up in the morning and having half a bottle of wine. Before we even had Jack, I knew that I couldn’t even look after myself let alone another baby, but I kept it to myself.’ 

The rave scene in the late 90s saw Ian going on benders every weekend but he managed to hold down his job at the Bentley factory in Crewe for a decade

The rave scene in the late 90s saw Ian going on benders every weekend but he managed to hold down his job at the Bentley factory in Crewe for a decade

The rave scene in the late 90s saw Ian going on benders every weekend but he managed to hold down his job at the Bentley factory in Crewe for a decade

By his early twenties, Ian was 'taking things to the next level' on the late 90s rave scene.

By his early twenties, Ian was 'taking things to the next level' on the late 90s rave scene.

He says his downward spiral began when the 'benders' turned into drinking wine before work

He says his downward spiral began when the 'benders' turned into drinking wine before work

By his early twenties, Ian was ‘taking things to the next level’ on the late 90s rave scene. He says his downward spiral began when the ‘benders’ turned into drinking wine before work

New life: Ian with his girlfriend Louisa, 36, who he met on social media after celebrating his sobriety. The couple live separately but Ian describes her as his 'rock'

New life: Ian with his girlfriend Louisa, 36, who he met on social media after celebrating his sobriety. The couple live separately but Ian describes her as his 'rock'

New life: Ian with his girlfriend Louisa, 36, who he met on social media after celebrating his sobriety. The couple live separately but Ian describes her as his ‘rock’

In recovery: Ian in his local boxing gym where he trained to be a UMA fighter

In recovery: Ian in his local boxing gym where he trained to be a UMA fighter

With his children Jack and Amelia

With his children Jack and Amelia

In recovery: Ian in his local boxing gym in Crewe where he trained to be a UMA fighter. Right: With his children Jack and Amelia. He says his children know that alcohol makes him ‘poorly in the head’

Four years after he made the decision not to take heroin on the streets - after a dealer told him to 'think of his kids' - Ian is now regularly competing as a UMA fighter

Four years after he made the decision not to take heroin on the streets - after a dealer told him to 'think of his kids' - Ian is now regularly competing as a UMA fighter

Four years after he made the decision not to take heroin on the streets – after a dealer told him to ‘think of his kids’ – Ian is now regularly competing as a UMA fighter

His bosses noticed his decline and signed him off work for nearly a year on sick leave, something Ian says increased his dependency on cocaine and alcohol as he used his statutory pay to feed his addiction.  

He says: ‘I did go a couple of times to Alcoholics Anonymous. There was a guy who told a story about ending up homeless and losing his family there once – and I just thought “I’m not even that bad”. It fuelled my denial.’

At the same time, heated arguments with his then partner in front of their two children saw her ask him to move into a rented flat. The death of his granddad, who’d raised Ian as a son, left him reaching for the bottle even harder.  

I got money from begging. A bottle of cider from Aldi for two quid – it’s not a lot of money. It’s easy to get two quid…

A disciplinary hearing followed at work and Ian was laid off, which prompted his landlord to end his tenancy forcing him to move back in with his mum.  

After just two weeks at his mother Jacqueline’s home, she called the police and asked him to leave, unable to cope with her son’s ’24/7′ addiction.    

‘I was literally drinking myself to death. I was at her house for two weeks and when she cleared my bedroom out, she found 197 empty bottles of cider and wine. I was stealing her rings to fund my habit.’  

Ian with his grandfather Steve; his death at 90 came as a huge blow and sent Ian further into his descent into addiction

Ian with his grandfather Steve; his death at 90 came as a huge blow and sent Ian further into his descent into addiction

Ian with his grandfather Steve; his death at 90 came as a huge blow and sent Ian further into his descent into addiction 

A recent photo of Ian with Louisa, who he met at one year sober after chatting on Facebook, and younger family members

A recent photo of Ian with Louisa, who he met at one year sober after chatting on Facebook, and younger family members

A recent photo of Ian with Louisa, who he met at one year sober after chatting on Facebook, and younger family members

Ian’s downward curve continued and he says his mother saved his life by calling the police, saying: ‘She had no other way out, she was enabling my addiction by letting me live there. I was just drinking and passing out.’ 

The YMCA told him that night that ‘it wasn’t cold enough’ and he was over 30 and so they couldn’t offer a bed; he ended up sleeping in a church before spending six months on the streets. 

He says: ‘I got money from begging. I’d then buy a bottle of cider from Aldi for two quid – it’s not a lot of money. It’s easy to get two quid.’

Ian’s lowest moment was when he was ‘ready’ to take heroin because life on the streets was so bleak he couldn’t see any way out of his situation. 

‘It was a turning point. The guy I was with said “think of your kids” and he took it himself instead. Shortly after I went to a homeless shelter and told them ‘I need to get off the drink.’

On a particularly freezing night, Ian also went to A&E and threatened to take his own life and mental health services became involved in his plight.  

Ian with his family in a recent photo; he began seeing his children again after completing the ten-day detox programme

Ian with his family in a recent photo; he began seeing his children again after completing the ten-day detox programme

Ian with his family in a recent photo; he began seeing his children again after completing the ten-day detox programme

The key to his recovery was getting a physical address, he says, after mental health worker Mandy Moorcroft found him supported accommodation at Adullam Homes in Crewe. 

On his third attempt to prove he could take recovery seriously, his alcohol readings were low enough that he was enlisted in a detox programme and he says he ‘didn’t look back’. 

With an address, he got benefits and he could afford his train fare to Birkenhead where he did a ten-day detox. 

However, seeing his estranged brother in October 2015 sparked a relapse that lasted for seven days and saw Ian drinking cider in a bush, something that jeopardised his supported accommodation place.  

How common is alcohol addiction?

It has been estimated that 1.4 per cent of all adults (aged 18+) drink at dependent levels and potentially need treatment

October 16th 2015 would be the last time he would have a drink. 

He had four months of intensive therapy with charity Acorn Recovery Projects and started hitting the gym to beat a bout of depression that followed ‘from having nothing to fill the void of drinking’. Ian also trained as a counsellor. 

Re-discovering Thai boxing has, he says, helped his mental health and last year he competed in the British championships just because he had the opportunity. This year he won the World Thai Gold Boxing Champion, held in Barnsley, after training hard twice a day. 

He says: ‘I went to fight and I ended up winning. It was the best feeling in the world. My children watched a video of me fight and we all had a cry when I won. It was a money-can’t-buy moment for me.’

He adds that he would never have believed it would be possible to bring himself back from the brink, saying: ‘No matter how far in the ground you go, you can always pull yourself out. I honestly thought “how am I going to get a job, get off the drugs and the alcohol”. It seemed impossible but I’ve worked hard and good things have happened to me since.’  

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Woman who was married when she met her now-husband on an extra-marital dating site has ‘no regrets’

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A woman who was married when she met her now-husband on an extra-marital affair site has revealed she has ‘no regrets’ – despite not speaking to some family members for over 10 years as a result.

Stephania Meyer, 47, from Toronto, told how before signing up to Ashley Madison, she was a stay-at-home mother and all she and her then-husband had in common were their children.

The couple had been married for 11 years when she decided to join the leading married dating site, where she met Michael Oshust – and an affair quickly began.

When her straying was discovered after just three months, Stephania decided to leave her husband for Michael – and the pair have since tied the knot.

‘While I’m not proud of the way we met, I couldn’t be happier that we are together,’ explained Stephania. ‘I have no regrets and this was absolutely the right choice for me.’ 

Stephania Meyer, 47, from Toronto, has spoken out about why she chose to join an extra-marital affair website. Pictured, with her now-husband, Michael Oshust at Las Vegas Bellagio in 2013

Stephania Meyer, 47, from Toronto, has spoken out about why she chose to join an extra-marital affair website. Pictured, with her now-husband, Michael Oshust at Las Vegas Bellagio in 2013

Stephania Meyer, 47, from Toronto, has spoken out about why she chose to join an extra-marital affair website. Pictured, with her now-husband, Michael Oshust at Las Vegas Bellagio in 2013

Stephania and Michael tied the knot three years after their affair was discovered - and they have since been together for over 12 years. Pictured on their wedding day

Stephania and Michael tied the knot three years after their affair was discovered - and they have since been together for over 12 years. Pictured on their wedding day

Stephania and Michael tied the knot three years after their affair was discovered – and they have since been together for over 12 years. Pictured on their wedding day

She continued: ‘However, I do acknowledge the toll it took on my personal life and how I was harshly judged by those closest to me.’

‘In the beginning, I lost friends who had been with me for many years. Some felt I was so wrong for cheating, some thought they couldn’t trust me.’

‘I haven’t spoken with certain family members for more than 10 years, some of which live about 10 minutes away.’

Stephania, who was 32 when she decided to join the site, admitted she had never been or been tempted to be unfaithful before.

‘I heard numerous radio ads for Ashley Madison and it peaked some curiosity as I was missing companionship in my marriage,’ she explained.

‘My husband and I had already been discussing separation. This was a way for me to dip my toes into a life outside my marriage.’            

Stephania and Michael (pictured at a Motley Crüe concert in 2015) met in person just six weeks after chatting online - and said by that point, they both knew they had 'a connection that was unlike any other'

Stephania and Michael (pictured at a Motley Crüe concert in 2015) met in person just six weeks after chatting online - and said by that point, they both knew they had 'a connection that was unlike any other'

Stephania and Michael (pictured at a Motley Crüe concert in 2015) met in person just six weeks after chatting online – and said by that point, they both knew they had ‘a connection that was unlike any other’

Stephania admitted she's not proud of the way she met now-husband Michael (pictured together) but insisted she has 'no regrets.' Pictured returning home from Punta Cana in 2016

Stephania admitted she's not proud of the way she met now-husband Michael (pictured together) but insisted she has 'no regrets.' Pictured returning home from Punta Cana in 2016

Stephania admitted she’s not proud of the way she met now-husband Michael (pictured together) but insisted she has ‘no regrets.’ Pictured returning home from Punta Cana in 2016

But while she made the decision to embark on an extra-marital affair, Stephania said it didn’t stop her from feeling guilty.

‘I never got married with the intention to cheat, or hurt my husband and family,’ she said. ‘But I also never thought I’d wind up being so lonely in my marriage. I knew it wasn’t sustainable. I craved a romantic connection and intimacy.’

It wasn’t long before Stephania met a match in Michael, who was going through a divorce at the time, and just six weeks after chatting online, they decided to meet in person – and in secret. 

‘We had been messaging, texting and having phone calls daily up until that point,’ she explained. ‘I enjoyed getting to know him and felt a genuine connection early on. I wanted to see where it would go. It was exciting.’

She added: ‘We met at a coffee shop that was half way between both our residences. I didn’t really have to bother making up an elaborate excuse to tell my husband.’

‘I was a stay at home mom at the time with my own part-time business so I was able to say I was at “work”. The anticipation for the date was exhilarating since we talked so much leading up to that first face-to-face encounter.’

But despite the thrill in her own life, the busy mother admitted she didn’t worry about the impact of the affair on her children. 

‘I was in a different head space as I had found someone who I connected with,’ explained Stephania. ‘I was prioritizing my own happiness for the first time in a long time. I felt rejuvenated and alive again.’

Speaking of juggling two different lives, Stephania (pictured with Michael at a Jason Bonham concert in 2018) explained: 'It was incredibly difficult to maintain both worlds - one predictable and routine, the other exciting and adventurous'

Speaking of juggling two different lives, Stephania (pictured with Michael at a Jason Bonham concert in 2018) explained: 'It was incredibly difficult to maintain both worlds - one predictable and routine, the other exciting and adventurous'

Speaking of juggling two different lives, Stephania (pictured with Michael at a Jason Bonham concert in 2018) explained: ‘It was incredibly difficult to maintain both worlds – one predictable and routine, the other exciting and adventurous’

Stephania went on to say she and Michael started a relationship ‘almost instantly.’ 

‘By the time we actually met, we knew we had a connection that was unlike any other,’ she explained. ‘We didn’t want to be apart, so we basically had to figure out from that first meeting onward how our future would unfold. It moved quickly.’

But juggling two separate lives didn’t come easy for Stephania – who had to sneak about so she wasn’t caught out.

‘It was incredibly difficult to maintain both worlds – one predictable and routine, the other exciting and adventurous,’ she explained. ‘I had the responsibilities that accompanied motherhood and marriage, but had a budding affair partner that made me feel like a giddy teenager on the inside.’  

And it was three months in that her then-husband suspected something wasn’t quite right.

‘He didn’t suspect anything at first,’ she said. ‘He did tell me later on that something was different about me. He noticed I seemed happier and generally more full of life. He eventually found messages and emails which confirmed his suspicions.’

‘At the time I was at my affair partner’s hockey game. My husband called my phone and confronted me. Honestly, it was almost a relief that he now knew.’

Stephania and Michael tied the knot three years later in Los Cabos – and she says 12 years later they still have the same connection. 

‘He is my best friend, my better half, my rock,’ she said. ‘My girls were very young at the time, and didn’t really understand.’

‘When they were old enough to understand, I was completely honest with them and told them about how I met Michael and the impact it had on all involved.’  

Happy couple Stephania and Michael (pictured at a Def Leppard concert in 2017) have since been together for 12 years and describe each other as their 'best friends'

Happy couple Stephania and Michael (pictured at a Def Leppard concert in 2017) have since been together for 12 years and describe each other as their 'best friends'

Happy couple Stephania and Michael (pictured at a Def Leppard concert in 2017) have since been together for 12 years and describe each other as their ‘best friends’

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Maid of honour gifts bride with a bespoke bouquet made from CHICKEN NUGGETS

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A maid of honor surprised her fast food-loving cousin with a bespoke bouquet made from chicken nuggets during her wedding reception.

Blair Hardy married Adam Tyson earlier this month at the Radisson Hotel in Toledo, Ohio, and paid extra to have nuggets and fries at her wedding so she could indulge in her favorite foods, while her guests were served traditional meals.

But wanting to do one better, maid of honor Jenna Spetz incorporated the bride’s love for nuggets into a surprise bespoke bouquet. 

Maid of honor Jenna Spetz incorporated her cousin's love for nuggets into a surprise bespoke bouquet. Pictured: Bride Blair Hardy eating the gift next to her husband Adam Tyson

Maid of honor Jenna Spetz incorporated her cousin's love for nuggets into a surprise bespoke bouquet. Pictured: Bride Blair Hardy eating the gift next to her husband Adam Tyson

Maid of honor Jenna Spetz incorporated her cousin’s love for nuggets into a surprise bespoke bouquet. Pictured: Bride Blair Hardy eating the gift next to her husband Adam Tyson

Jenna was making her maid of honor speech at her cousin’s reception when, unbeknownst to the bride and groom, she brought out a floral arrangement of nuggets.

The nuggets were provided by Tyson Foods, to celebrate Blair becoming a Tyson.

Jenna contacted Blair’s favorite food company to see if they could make her big day extra special. 

And to her shock, replied with the idea of making a bouquet out of nuggets and supplied it for the special day – along with a year’s worth of their product.

Jenna with her cousin after gifting her with the surprise bespoke bouquet made from nuggets

Jenna with her cousin after gifting her with the surprise bespoke bouquet made from nuggets

Jenna with her cousin after gifting her with the surprise bespoke bouquet made from nuggets

Jenna was making her maid of honor speech at her cousin's reception when, unbeknownst to the bride and groom, she brought out a floral arrangement of nuggets

Jenna was making her maid of honor speech at her cousin's reception when, unbeknownst to the bride and groom, she brought out a floral arrangement of nuggets

Jenna was making her maid of honor speech at her cousin’s reception when, unbeknownst to the bride and groom, she brought out a floral arrangement of nuggets

Jenna told Business Insider: ‘Blair’s reaction was priceless! She was grinning from ear to ear and giggling. Blair of course ate the dino-nuggets from the toast immediately!

‘[Blair] has always LOVED dino nuggets and was marrying a man with the last name Tyson, so it really was a match made in heaven.’

And despite the groom looking less than impressed in one of the images, Jenna said he was definitely ‘living for it’. 

Posting a selection of images from the reception, Jenna wrote on her Instagram: ‘A HUGE thank you to @tysonbrand for helping me pull off this EPIC nugget toast! I think the brides more excited for nugs than her new hubby!’

The bride even received a letter from Tyson Foods’ president and CEO Noel White, who offered the newly weds ‘a few bite-sized pieces of advice’.

His note read: ‘Always begin and end each day with kisses and nugs. Remind each other how dino-mite you are together. Double-dipping will only bring you closer. Never go to bed angry (unless he ate the last nugget).’

It finished with: ‘Wishing you many years of marital bliss, from one Tyson family to another.’ 

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