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Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa to rise to 2.9 %-World Bank

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Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is expected to rise to 2.9 percent in 2020, the World Bank said Tuesday in its January 2020 Global Economic Prospect report.

The bank cited improved investor confidence in some large economies, easing of energy hurdles, a rise in oil production, which led to recovery in oil exporters as indicators.

It also mentioned robust growth among agricultural commodity exporters within the region.

This is a weak forecast than previously expected reflecting softer demand from key trading partners, lower commodity prices and adverse domestic developments in several countries.

In South Africa, growth is expected to pick up to 0.9 percent. In Nigeria, growth will likely edge up to 2.1 percent while Angola is expected to accelerate to 1.5 percent.

Kenya’s growth is seen scaling up to 6 percent.

In the West African Economic Monetary Union, growth is expected to be steady at 6.4 percent, the Bretton Wood institution said.

Source: Africa News

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Watching Prince Charles with Meghan made me cry says Thomas Markle

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The Duchess of Sussex‘s estranged father told a bombshell documentary how he cried as he watched her marry Prince Harry from a ‘safe house’ after his release from hospital.

In the 90-minute documentary that aired on Channel 5 last night, a visibly crestfallen Thomas Markle described watching his daughter Meghan walking down the aisle on TV shortly after suffering a heart attack.

An emotional Mr Markle told the interviewer he was ‘jealous’ of the Prince of Wales walking his daughter down the aisle was something he ‘really wanted to do’.

He said: ‘I admit I cried a bit about that. To this day I can’t forget that moment, she was beautiful.’

In the extraordinary film the 75-year-old American, who has not spoken to his daughter since her May 2018, detailed the breakdown of their relationship and accused Prince Harry of acting like a ‘sensitive’ 12-year-old. 

He said: ‘I stayed at a safe house and watched the wedding. My daughter looked beautiful. I wish that I could have been there with her. I was certainly appreciative Charles was there.’

In a Channel 5 TV documentary, Thomas Markle describes Meghan and Harry’s behaviour as embarrassing

In a Channel 5 TV documentary, Thomas Markle describes Meghan and Harry’s behaviour as embarrassing

In a Channel 5 TV documentary, Thomas Markle describes Meghan and Harry’s behaviour as embarrassing

The opening scenes showed Thomas Markle looking at various royal gifts he has received, such as a mug commemorating the birth of Archie, his grandson.

The opening scenes showed Thomas Markle looking at various royal gifts he has received, such as a mug commemorating the birth of Archie, his grandson.

The opening scenes showed Thomas Markle looking at various royal gifts he has received, such as a mug commemorating the birth of Archie, his grandson.

Mr Markle, proudly shows a picture of Meghan on the day of her birth, and describes her as a 'natural beauty' and the most 'special thing in my life.'

Mr Markle, proudly shows a picture of Meghan on the day of her birth, and describes her as a 'natural beauty' and the most 'special thing in my life.'

Mr Markle, proudly shows a picture of Meghan on the day of her birth, and describes her as a ‘natural beauty’ and the most ‘special thing in my life.’

The documentary moves onto his upbringing, and he shows a number of pictures of him as a young boy, in which he jokes: 'I looked like Harry...better looking' (pictured)

The documentary moves onto his upbringing, and he shows a number of pictures of him as a young boy, in which he jokes: 'I looked like Harry...better looking' (pictured)

The documentary moves onto his upbringing, and he shows a number of pictures of him as a young boy, in which he jokes: ‘I looked like Harry…better looking’ (pictured)

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor meet Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his daughter Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe at the Desmond & Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation during their royal tour of South Africa on September 25, 2019

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor meet Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his daughter Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe at the Desmond & Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation during their royal tour of South Africa on September 25, 2019

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor meet Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his daughter Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe at the Desmond & Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation during their royal tour of South Africa on September 25, 2019

He defended his decision to speak out in the film and to be paid for the lengthy interview.

He said: ‘At this point, they owe me. The royals owe me. Harry owes me, Meghan owes me. What I’ve been through I should be rewarded for. My daughter told me that when I reach my senior years she’ll take care of me. I’m in my senior years now – it’s time to look after Daddy.’

The retired Hollywood lighting director, who has never met the royal couple’s baby son Archie, described his relationship with his daughter as ‘complicated’.

He insisted: ‘To them I don’t exist and now Harry, whether he realises it or not, is part of my family and I’m part of his. We should be talking.’ He added: ‘He’s not 12 years old any more – he’s got no right to be this sensitive.’

Mr Markle, who divorced Meghan’s mother Dora in the late 1980s, said the last time he spoke to his daughter was during an emotional series of phone calls days before her wedding.

He was due to walk Meghan up the aisle for her wedding in Windsor, but offered to pull out when it emerged that he had made a secret deal with a photographer.

He agreed to pose for photos which showed him preparing for the wedding shortly after Kensington Palace appealed for the media to respect his privacy. 

Mr Markle said his involvement in the deal would ‘haunt me for the rest of my life’, and detailed a phone call in which Harry reprimanded him over the decision.

The American has not spoken to his daughter since her wedding in May 2018, and admitted crying as he watched her tie the knot with Prince Harry

The American has not spoken to his daughter since her wedding in May 2018, and admitted crying as he watched her tie the knot with Prince Harry

The American has not spoken to his daughter since her wedding in May 2018, and admitted crying as he watched her tie the knot with Prince Harry

He said that he offered to apologise to the Queen and the Royal Family, but was told not to do so.

Days later, he was taken to hospital for emergency heart surgery and was told by doctors he would not be able to fly to Britain for the wedding. 

Recalling the series of phone calls, he said Harry had told him off over the deal with the photographer. He added: ‘Harry said to me, ‘If you had listened to me, this wouldn’t have happened to you’. 

I said to him, ‘It’s too bad I didn’t die because then you guys could pretend you were sad,’ and then I hung up on them. I was done.’ Mr Markle said he had spoken to the couple after his operation when he learned he would not be able to fly to Britain.

He said: ‘I’m sure Meghan cried and was very upset, and I’m sure Harry seemed upset.’

Mr Markle also told the programme: ‘Meghan and Harry said they would protect me from [stress]. Their protection was simply to say, ‘don’t talk to anybody’.’

He did not hold out much hope of a reconciliation, saying: ‘The last time they might see me is being lowered into the ground. I don’t think at this point they’re thrilled to see me or want to talk to me.’

The 90-minute documentary used previously unseen photographs and home videos to chart Meghan's early years

The 90-minute documentary used previously unseen photographs and home videos to chart Meghan's early years

The 90-minute documentary used previously unseen photographs and home videos to chart Meghan’s early years

The documentary also looked at the early parts of Mr Markle's life before Meghan was born, Pictured: Mr Markle as a young man

The documentary also looked at the early parts of Mr Markle's life before Meghan was born, Pictured: Mr Markle as a young man

The documentary also looked at the early parts of Mr Markle’s life before Meghan was born, Pictured: Mr Markle as a young man

In the film, Thomas Markle: My Story, he said he was embarrassed and disappointed by Meghan and Harry’s decision to step back from their duties as senior royals.

The 90-minute documentary used previously unseen photographs and home videos to chart Meghan’s early years, when she lived with her father between the ages of 11 and 18. In the past, Mr Markle has claimed that he paid for his daughter’s education.

He said he had sold Facebook shares to pay £15,000 towards her first wedding to producer Trevor Engelson in 2011, but claimed she had given him no financial support since marrying Harry.

Mr Markle, speaking from his home in Mexico, also told how he only learned Meghan was pregnant when he heard it on the radio.

He added: ‘It’s almost a joke when you tell people you heard it on the radio. This is my daughter talking about my grandchild. She’s going to have a grandchild that’s mine and I’m not hearing about it on the phone. I’m hearing about it on the radio.’

Mr Markle said he was ready to give evidence against the couple in a court case they launched after he gave one of Meghan’s letters to the Mail on Sunday.

She lived with her father between the ages of 11 and 18. In the past, Mr Markle has claimed that he paid for his daughter's education.

She lived with her father between the ages of 11 and 18. In the past, Mr Markle has claimed that he paid for his daughter's education.

She lived with her father between the ages of 11 and 18. In the past, Mr Markle has claimed that he paid for his daughter’s education.

He told Channel 5 he wanted to set the record straight after Meghan’s friends had briefed a US magazine that the letter was a ‘loving’ attempt at a reconciliation, when he believed it was an attack. 

He insisted he had held back parts of the letter which were ‘too offensive and too hurtful to me’, but added: ‘I’m going to defend myself.’

The duchess has alleged that the Mail on Sunday – the sister paper of the Daily Mail – breached her privacy, her data rights and her copyright when it published parts of the letter. The newspaper denies her claim and is expected to call Mr Markle as a witness if the case is heard at the High Court.

At his home Mr Markle proudly showed off various royal gifts he had received, such as a mug commemorating the birth of Archie, his grandson. And he even joked that he had heard about Meghan and Harry branded condoms. 

Viewers were treated to pictures of Meghan on the day of her birth, and he describes her as a ‘natural beauty’ and the most ‘special thing in my life.’ 

There were also pictures of Mr Markle’s upbringing, with pictures of him as a young man. In one picture of him as a boy, he jokes: ‘I looked like Harry…better looking.’

He told the 90-minute documentary about meeting Meghan’s mother, and and how he felt about his daughter was born by C-section.

A number of new unseen clips and photographs were seen in the documentary on Channel 5

A number of new unseen clips and photographs were seen in the documentary on Channel 5

A number of new unseen clips and photographs were seen in the documentary on Channel 5

‘Not everybody seems to approve of those kind of relationships,’ he added with regards to being in a mixed-race relationship with Doria.

‘People would look at Doria like she was a housekeeper. It wasn’t fair. Of course it wasn’t fair.

‘I think she’s going through the same problem right now with the royals. I don’t think they know where to place her. She always looks scared. She always looks like a deer in the headlights.’

He spoke of his elation when he found out that Doria was pregnant and that he was ‘knocked out by that child’ when Meghan was born.

He added: ‘When they handed me the baby I was thrilled I could not be happier. I looked at her and saw her face and finger around my finger and that was it. I knew she was going to be special.’  

The documentary was spliced with adorable images of Meghan fishing and joking with her father on various home movies. 

The 90-minute documentary, Thomas Markle: My Story, explores the background to what it calls his 'complicated' relationship with his daughter and their dramatic fallout in the run-up to her wedding to Prince Harry in May 2018.

The 90-minute documentary, Thomas Markle: My Story, explores the background to what it calls his 'complicated' relationship with his daughter and their dramatic fallout in the run-up to her wedding to Prince Harry in May 2018.

The 90-minute documentary, Thomas Markle: My Story, explores the background to what it calls his ‘complicated’ relationship with his daughter and their dramatic fallout in the run-up to her wedding to Prince Harry in May 2018.

The 90-minute documentary, Thomas Markle: My Story, explores the background to what it calls his ‘complicated’ relationship with his daughter and their dramatic fallout in the run-up to her wedding to Prince Harry in May 2018.

Mr Markle’s intervention in the monarchy’s worst crisis for a generation came as the Queen‘s top aides finalised a deal for the couple, who are quitting as frontline Royals and leaving Britain to seek financial independence. 

The 90-minute documentary explores the background to what he calls his ‘complicated’ relationship with his daughter and their dramatic fallout in the run-up to her wedding to Prince Harry in May 2018.

In addition, it charts Meghan’s formative years – she lived with Thomas between the ages of 11 and 18.

‘Uncomfortable to watch…why didn’t the royals help Thomas Markle more?’ Viewers feel sorry for Meghan’s father after bombshell documentary about his relationship with his duchess daughter

Viewers said they felt sorry for Thomas Markle in tonight’s bombshell documentary which charted his relationship with the Duchess of Sussex.

In a tell-all 90-minute film, he accused his daughter and son-in-law of saying ‘trashy things’ about him and revealed he cried while watching Meghan walk down the aisle on her wedding day.

Mr Markle also said that Meghan had promised to look after him in his ‘senior years’.

He said: At this point, they owe me. The Royals owe me. Harry owes me, Meghan owes me. What I’ve been through I should be rewarded for. My daughter told me that when I reach my senior years she’ll take care of me.’

Social media users watching the extraordinary film seemed sympathetic to Mr Markle, with a number of people saying he seemed like a good father and a ‘genuine guy’.

In a tell-all 90-minute film, he accused his daughter and son-in-law of saying 'trashy things' about him and revealed he cried while watching Meghan walk down the aisle on her wedding day

In a tell-all 90-minute film, he accused his daughter and son-in-law of saying 'trashy things' about him and revealed he cried while watching Meghan walk down the aisle on her wedding day

In a tell-all 90-minute film, he accused his daughter and son-in-law of saying ‘trashy things’ about him and revealed he cried while watching Meghan walk down the aisle on her wedding day

Shanelle Stephens said: #ThomasMarkle seems like he was a really decent dad to Meghan. It’s so sad now she’s married into a prestigious family she doesn’t want anything to do with him.

‘It’s not like he wasn’t there for her when she was growing up. He was in your life #MeghanMarkle reach out to him.

Captain Tykey said: ‘Bless #thomasmarkle, so sad watching this. Clearly loves her very much.’

Another Twitter user said: ‘#Thomasmarkle has every right to tell his story. The guy has been slaughtered across the news and social media for two years.’

And Meg La Maniac, said: ‘The Thomas Markle documentary is a tear jerker. He’s a sweet humble man. Both taz and I are crying!’

Mr Markle’s intervention in the monarchy’s worst crisis for a generation came as the Queen‘s top aides finalised a deal for the couple, who are quitting as frontline Royals and leaving Britain to seek financial independence.

The 90-minute documentary explores the background to what he calls his ‘complicated’ relationship with his daughter and their dramatic fallout in the run-up to her wedding to Prince Harry in May 2018.

In addition, it charts Meghan’s formative years – she lived with Thomas between the ages of 11 and 18.

 

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Plane full of passengers from coronavirus epicentre in China lands in Sydney

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Hundreds of passengers today arrived in Australia from the Chinese city of Wuhan, the epicentre of a new deadly virus which is spreading around the world.

Passengers from China Eastern flight MU749 were wearing masks as they made their way through Sydney Airport’s arrivals hall just before midday after a 10-hour night flight on an A332 plane that can hold 234 people. 

The flight was one of the last to leave the city of 11million before a quarantine was put in place and all outbound trains and planes were cancelled. 

The passengers were screened in China before they boarded and, when their aircraft landed, they were asked by the pilot to declare if they felt unwell.

NSW Health had a team of four nurses and doctors, who wore masks but not full HAZMAT suits, at the airport to interview passengers and ask them if they had any cold-like symptoms before they went through customs.

The passengers were also screened by thermal imaging to check their temperatures – and given leaflets in English and Mandarin telling them to see a doctor if they suffered sweats, breathing difficulties or chills.

A plan was in place to take any passenger suspected of being infected to Westmead Hospital – but nobody was found to be sick. 

Passengers from the final flight from Wuhan - the epicentre of the coronavirus - are seen walking through arrivals at Sydney Airport on Thursday

Passengers from the final flight from Wuhan - the epicentre of the coronavirus - are seen walking through arrivals at Sydney Airport on Thursday

Passengers from the final flight from Wuhan – the epicentre of the coronavirus – are seen walking through arrivals at Sydney Airport on Thursday

A captain of the flight is pictured walking through arrivals. No one will be allowed to enter or leave Wuhan, a city of 11 million in China's Hubei province, as one of the country's busiest travel seasons surrounding the Lunar New Year kicks off.

A captain of the flight is pictured walking through arrivals. No one will be allowed to enter or leave Wuhan, a city of 11 million in China's Hubei province, as one of the country's busiest travel seasons surrounding the Lunar New Year kicks off.

Flight crew were seen walking through the arrivals hall with masks and gloves, with one pictured in the background wearing dark-shaded sunglasses to cover his face

Flight crew were seen walking through the arrivals hall with masks and gloves, with one pictured in the background wearing dark-shaded sunglasses to cover his face

The flight captain (left) and other flight staff (right) were seen walking through the arrivals hall after getting off the plane 

The passengers from China Eastern flight MU749 were wearing masks as they made their way through Sydney Airport's arrivals hall

The passengers from China Eastern flight MU749 were wearing masks as they made their way through Sydney Airport's arrivals hall

The passengers from China Eastern flight MU749 were wearing masks as they made their way through Sydney Airport’s arrivals hall 

The passengers were screened in China before they boarded and, when their aircraft landed, they were asked by the pilot to declare if they felt unwell. Pictured: Children at Sydney Airport wearing masks

The passengers were screened in China before they boarded and, when their aircraft landed, they were asked by the pilot to declare if they felt unwell. Pictured: Children at Sydney Airport wearing masks

The passengers were screened in China before they boarded and, when their aircraft landed, they were asked by the pilot to declare if they felt unwell. Pictured: Children at Sydney Airport wearing masks

NSW Health had a team of four nurses and doctors, who wore masks but not full HAZMAT suits, at the airport to interview anyone who had cold-like symptoms before they went through customs. Pictured: Children at Sydney Airport wearing masks

NSW Health had a team of four nurses and doctors, who wore masks but not full HAZMAT suits, at the airport to interview anyone who had cold-like symptoms before they went through customs. Pictured: Children at Sydney Airport wearing masks

Pictured: Children at Sydney Airport wearing masks

Pictured: Children at Sydney Airport wearing masks

NSW Health had a team of four nurses and doctors, who wore masks but not full HAZMAT suits, at the airport to interview anyone who had cold-like symptoms before they went through customs. Pictured: Children at Sydney Airport wearing masks

Medical staff check the body temperature of passengers as they arrive at a railway station in Yingtan City, Jiangxi province, China as part of precautions regarding the virus outbreak

Medical staff check the body temperature of passengers as they arrive at a railway station in Yingtan City, Jiangxi province, China as part of precautions regarding the virus outbreak

Medical staff check the body temperature of passengers as they arrive at a railway station in Yingtan City, Jiangxi province, China as part of precautions regarding the virus outbreak

The flight's cabin crew are pictured walking into arrivals. Workers at the Sydney Airport information desk said they had been told by their bosses not to speak to the media under any circumstances

The flight's cabin crew are pictured walking into arrivals. Workers at the Sydney Airport information desk said they had been told by their bosses not to speak to the media under any circumstances

Flight crew wore gloves as they walked through the airport

Flight crew wore gloves as they walked through the airport

The flight’s cabin crew are pictured walking into arrivals wearing gloves. Workers at the Sydney Airport information desk said they had been told by their bosses not to speak to the media under any circumstances

This is the leaflet that passengers were given when they landed in Australia after flying from the Chinese city of Wuhan

This is the leaflet that passengers were given when they landed in Australia after flying from the Chinese city of Wuhan

This is the leaflet that passengers were given when they landed in Australia after flying from the Chinese city of Wuhan

One international student from Wuhan who was on the flight told Daily Mail Australia he was quizzed by officials on the way into the airport. 

‘A group of doctors wearing masks asked me if I had a cold and if I felt unwell, which I didn’t,’ he said.

‘They checked my temperature and then let me through. I got lucky because I’m on the last flight out of Wuhan.

‘The situation isn’t that bad there, it’s not as bad as all the scare stories.’

 Another passenger said they realised the situation was serious in Wuhan when the city was isolated.

Dozens of the passengers are likely to be visiting Australia as tourists or for family re-unions ahead of the Lunar New Year on Saturday

Dozens of the passengers are likely to be visiting Australia as tourists or for family re-unions ahead of the Lunar New Year on Saturday

Dozens of the passengers are likely to be visiting Australia as tourists or for family re-unions ahead of the Lunar New Year on Saturday

China Eastern flight MU749 arrives on the tarmac at Sydney International Airport in Sydney on Thursday from Wuhan

China Eastern flight MU749 arrives on the tarmac at Sydney International Airport in Sydney on Thursday from Wuhan

China Eastern flight MU749 arrives on the tarmac at Sydney International Airport in Sydney on Thursday from Wuhan

‘I was shocked when I heard that flights and trains were cancelled. To tell people not to leave during New Year is a drastic measure.’

One passenger said officials went up and down the plane when it landed, quizzing all the passengers.

‘They checked everyone but I wasn’t really worried,’ she said. 

A passenger named Kevin Ouyang, who held up his information leaflet as he posed for photos, said people travelling to Australia are worried about going home if the virus spreads.

‘People are very worried,’ he said. ‘It’s a big city.’

Flight crew were seen walking through the arrivals hall with masks and gloves. The captain, wearing sunglasses and a mask, was directed though the hall as a scrum of photographers took pictures. 

Dozens of the passengers are likely to be visiting Australia as tourists or for family re-unions ahead of the Lunar New Year on Saturday, raising fears they will be traveling to places with large crowds such as Bondi Beach and the Sydney Opera House.

Staff working at shops in the arrivals hall said they were on high alert as the flight from Wuhan landed.

One mobile phone shop worker, who asked not to be named, told Daily Mail Australia: ‘We’re very concerned about it and we’re taking precautions such as regularly washing our hands’.

It is possible that someone who is incubating the infection but is not yet ill is in Australia 
Dr Raina McIntyre, professor of global biosecurity at UNSW

A currency exchange worker said she was concerned because she had been getting more ill more than usual since working in the airport.

She said: ‘It’s really scary and I’m really worried about the virus because it’s easy for us working in the airport to catch infections. I would say I get a cold every few weeks – just because of the number of people passing through.

‘Cancelling flights from Wuhan is a good thing,’ she added.

Workers at the Sydney Airport information desk said they had been told by their bosses not to speak to the media under any circumstances.

The new coronavirus was discovered in Wuhan last month. It is believed to have spread from animals in the city’s market and has already killed 17 and spread to five countries including the US.

Doctors on Wednesday said the number of cases around the world may be as high as 10,000.

Today’s flight from Wuhan was the last one to enter Sydney before the quarantine imposed by the Chinese government.

‘The rise in the mobility of the public has objectively increased the risk of the epidemic spreading,’ Chinese National Health Commission vice minister Li Bin said.

Experts fear the new coronavirus, which is not yet named, may already be in Australia even though no-one in the country has been diagnosed.

An expert said even using thermal imaging to detect passengers with high temperatures may not stop the virus getting into Australia

An expert said even using thermal imaging to detect passengers with high temperatures may not stop the virus getting into Australia

Kevin Ouyang shows a the leaflet passengers received when getting off the place

Kevin Ouyang shows a the leaflet passengers received when getting off the place

An expert said even using thermal imaging to detect passengers with high temperatures may not stop the virus getting into Australia. Right: Kevin Ouyang shows a the leaflet passengers received when getting off the place

In a chilling warning, professor of global biosecurity at UNSW Dr Raina McIntyre said even using thermal imaging to detect passengers with high temperatures may not stop the virus getting into Australia

In a chilling warning, professor of global biosecurity at UNSW Dr Raina McIntyre said even using thermal imaging to detect passengers with high temperatures may not stop the virus getting into Australia

In a chilling warning, professor of global biosecurity at UNSW Dr Raina McIntyre said even using thermal imaging to detect passengers with high temperatures may not stop the virus getting into Australia

In an interview with Daily Mail Australia on Thursday morning, Dr Raina McIntyre, professor of global biosecurity at UNSW, said: ‘It is possible that someone who is incubating the infection but is not yet ill is in the country.

‘People can be incubating the disease and not have fever when they enter the country.’

In a chilling warning, Dr McIntyre said even using thermal imaging to detect passengers with high temperatures may not stop the virus getting into Australia.

She said: ‘Some infections involve transmission of virus before any symptoms appear – influenza is a classic example of this.’

Chinese authorities say 17 people have died and more than 500 have been infected, air and rail departures from Wuhan are suspended from January 23 

‘SARS, Ebola and MERS CoV tend to only be infectious when people are sick and have clear symptoms, so thermoscanning is more useful in such infections. We do not know yet whether this new coronavirus can be spread in the absence of symptoms. If it is like SARS, it is unlikely, but this needs to be confirmed with research.’

Dr McIntyre said that new measures must be put in place to stop the deadly infection spreading, including new triage protocols in hospitals.

She said: ‘What would really help detect cases and prevent outbreaks is automated triage protocols in emergency departments and general practice – where if a patient presents with fever, health workers are prompted to ask if they have travelled recently.

Passengers were expected to be welcomed by a crack team at Sydney Airport including four NSW Health doctors and nurses experienced in public health and infection control

Passengers were expected to be welcomed by a crack team at Sydney Airport including four NSW Health doctors and nurses experienced in public health and infection control

Passengers were expected to be welcomed by a crack team at Sydney Airport including four NSW Health doctors and nurses experienced in public health and infection control

‘If they have, and if they have returned from China, this would then trigger a protocol for isolating the patient and contacting relevant health authorities.

‘Time and time again we see failure of hospital triage when travel history is not asked – MERS CoV in South Korea for example – resulting in preventable epidemics. Providing returning passengers with information cards on who to contact should they develop symptoms is also useful.’  

The Chinese city of Wuhan was placed under quarantine on Thursday four hours after China Eastern flight MU749 took off in an effort to stop the spread of the killer coronavirus believed to have originated there. 

No one will be allowed to enter or leave Wuhan, a city of 11 million in China’s Hubei province, as one of the country’s busiest travel seasons surrounding the Lunar New Year kicks off.  

The crack team at Sydney Airport were set to include four NSW Health doctors and nurses experienced in public health and infection control alongside virology experts from Westmead Hospital and elsewhere.

The Chinese city of Wuhan was placed under quarantine on Thursday in an effort to stop the spread of the killer coronavirus believed to have originated there. A plane carrying hundreds of passengers from the city to Sydney has landed on Thursday

The Chinese city of Wuhan was placed under quarantine on Thursday in an effort to stop the spread of the killer coronavirus believed to have originated there. A plane carrying hundreds of passengers from the city to Sydney has landed on Thursday

The Chinese city of Wuhan was placed under quarantine on Thursday in an effort to stop the spread of the killer coronavirus believed to have originated there. A plane carrying hundreds of passengers from the city to Sydney has landed on Thursday

Taiwan's Center for Disease Control (CDC) personnel use thermal scanners to screen passengers arriving on a flight from China's Wuhan province

Taiwan's Center for Disease Control (CDC) personnel use thermal scanners to screen passengers arriving on a flight from China's Wuhan province

Taiwan’s Center for Disease Control (CDC) personnel use thermal scanners to screen passengers arriving on a flight from China’s Wuhan province 

A lady answers questions to the media as passengers arrive at Sydney International Airport after a flight from Wuhan

A lady answers questions to the media as passengers arrive at Sydney International Airport after a flight from Wuhan

A lady answers questions to the media as passengers arrive at Sydney International Airport after a flight from Wuhan

The team were due to wear masks and gloves when examining anyone with symptoms, NSW Health protection executive director Jeremy McAnulty said.

‘If it looks like they may have an infection … we can arrange for testing and management of that person right away,’ Dr McAnulty said.

Experts at Westmead Hospital can rapidly diagnose patients although if someone is very unwell they could be taken to a hospital closer to the airport.

Dr McAnulty said identifying potential carriers at the airport was ‘not foolproof by any means’ because people who’ve been exposed to the virus may not display symptoms for days.

The virus, an as-yet unnamed variant of the coronavirus, was first detected in Wuhan, China last month but has now breached China’s borders 

The virus is thought to have spread into humans from a Wuhan seafood market ‘which illegally traded wild animals’ before travelers carried it to at least five other countries – Thailand, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan and the United States. 

World Health Organization (WHO) officials met Wednesday to decide whether to declare the outbreak a ‘public health emergency of international concern’, but members’ opinions were ‘split’ and the committee will reconvene Thursday.

Experts say its possible up to 10,000 people in China alone have been exposed to the virus, called 2019-nCoV, which is from the same family that caused previous outbreaks of SARS and MERS, killing hundreds of people in dozens of countries.

China’s National Health Commission said the virus had been mutating, making it more difficult to control.  

Wuhan will temporarily shut down airport and train stations for outgoing passengers as authorities attempt to control the spread of the virus.

Residents have been urged not to leave the city, however, as it is the Lunar New Year holiday many will be planning trips. 

‘If it’s not necessary we suggest that people don’t come to Wuhan,’ Wuhan’s mayor Zhou Xianwang said. 

Chinese residents wear masks while waiting at a bus station near the closed Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, which has been linked to the outbreak that started in December

Chinese residents wear masks while waiting at a bus station near the closed Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, which has been linked to the outbreak that started in December

Chinese residents wear masks while waiting at a bus station near the closed Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, which has been linked to the outbreak that started in December

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK SO FAR? 

A total of 532 people are confirmed to have caught the unnamed coronavirus, which has never been seen before. Seventeen patients have died.

Most of the cases have occurred in Wuhan, a city in Hubei province home to 11million people. But patients have been diagnosed across China, including in Beijing and Shanghai.

The coronavirus, which is from the same family as SARS, has also spread to South Korea, Thailand, Japan and Taiwan.

Chinese officials yesterday confirmed the virus has spread between humans, suggesting it can be passed through coughs and sneezes.

The outbreak is believed to have started late last month among people connected to a seafood market in Wuhan, which has since been shut.

China is entering its busiest travel period due to the Lunar New Year, which sees many people travelling back to their home town or village.

Virologists fear the increased travel that will happen over the holidays will cause a surge in cases.

 

 

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Cancer con Belle Gibson seen at Melbourne Ethiopian community meeting

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A video has surfaced of cancer con-woman Belle Gibson at a Melbourne-based Ethiopian community group meeting.

The discovery of the vision comes a day after the 28-year-old’s Northcote home was raided and assets seized.

The raid was in an effort to recoup part of a $500,000 fine she received for falsely claiming she cured herself of brain cancer through diet and alternative therapies.

In the video, posted on Facebook by Shabo Media in October, a headscarf-clad Gibson goes by the name Sabontu and speaks at length about the ongoing plight of the Oromo people from “back home” in Ethiopia.

‘Healed’

The Federal Court fined Gibson $410,000 in 2017 for breaching consumer law when she claimed she had brain cancer but healed herself through diet and alternative therapies, going on to make a profit from her cookbook The Whole Pantry and an app with the same name.

Gibson received $440,500 from sales of her app and book but donated only about $10,000.

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Her fine has now grown to more than half a million dollars with costs and interest.

Gibson appeared in the Federal Court last year claiming she was unable to pay the fine, despite a financial analysis showing she spent about $91,000 between 2017 and 2019, including $13,000 on clothes, cosmetics and accessories.

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