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Historian David Starkey says Remembrance Sunday has become crazy religious ritual

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TV historian David Starkey has claimed Remembrance Sunday has become a 'crazy religious ritual' that imposes 'poppy fascism' on everyone in Britain

TV historian David Starkey has claimed Remembrance Sunday has become a 'crazy religious ritual' that imposes 'poppy fascism' on everyone in Britain

TV historian David Starkey has claimed Remembrance Sunday has become a ‘crazy religious ritual’ that imposes ‘poppy fascism’ on everyone in Britain

TV historian David Starkey has claimed Remembrance Sunday has become a ‘crazy religious ritual’ that imposes ‘poppy fascism’ on everyone in Britain.

Starkey, 74, said yesterday’s Remembrance services wrongly made soldiers out to be either ‘heroes or victims’. 

He argued that now servicemen and women volunteer to defend their country because they want to do it, even claiming some ‘enjoy killing’ and should not be praised for it. 

The controversial constitutional expert said Remembrance Day in the UK has created a culture that demands people prove they are thinking of the war dead. 

He told a podcast today: ‘There is what we call poppy fascism… the absolute requirement to do it.’

‘We’re turning soldiers into either victims or heroes, and the two sort of uneasily shift around each other. They’re neither.’ 

The Queen appeared to shed a tear as she stood on a balcony overlooking the Cenotaph in central London yesterday.

Her son Prince Charles laid a poppy wreath on her behalf and was joined by his two sons Harry and William. 

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn were among dozens of politicians who attended commemorations. 

Starkey, 74, said yesterday's Remembrance services in London (pictured) wrongly made soldiers out to be either 'heroes or victims'

Starkey, 74, said yesterday's Remembrance services in London (pictured) wrongly made soldiers out to be either 'heroes or victims'

Starkey, 74, said yesterday’s Remembrance services in London (pictured) wrongly made soldiers out to be either ‘heroes or victims’

Putting their differences aside: Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn walks side by side with Prime Minister Boris Johnson down Whitehall with their poppy wreaths yesterday morning

Putting their differences aside: Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn walks side by side with Prime Minister Boris Johnson down Whitehall with their poppy wreaths yesterday morning

Putting their differences aside: Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn walks side by side with Prime Minister Boris Johnson down Whitehall with their poppy wreaths yesterday morning

The Queen was seen wiping her eyes as she joined other members of the royal family to attend the annual Remembrance Sunday Service at The Cenotaph

The Queen was seen wiping her eyes as she joined other members of the royal family to attend the annual Remembrance Sunday Service at The Cenotaph

The Queen was seen wiping her eyes as she joined other members of the royal family to attend the annual Remembrance Sunday Service at The Cenotaph

Former Prime Ministers Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Sir John Major were also there to pay their respects. 

Elderly veterans were pushed in their wheelchairs and wrapped up in blankets as they proudly displayed their medals. 

This year’s Remembrance Day marked 100 years since the Armistice and the end of the First World War. 

The Ministry of Defence said over 800 members of the Royal Navy, British Army and Royal Air Force went to services in Whitehall yesterday.

Elderly veterans were pushed in their wheelchairs and wrapped up in blankets as they proudly displayed their medals

Elderly veterans were pushed in their wheelchairs and wrapped up in blankets as they proudly displayed their medals

 Elderly veterans were pushed in their wheelchairs and wrapped up in blankets as they proudly displayed their medals

Veterans are pictured sat together sporting their medals as they waited for the service to begin yesterday morning

Veterans are pictured sat together sporting their medals as they waited for the service to begin yesterday morning

Veterans are pictured sat together sporting their medals as they waited for the service to begin yesterday morning

Speaking on the same podcast, Starkey also slammed our politicians, many of whom were pictured paying their respects yesterday.

He said many ‘are not good enough’ and ‘shouldn’t be paid’ for the work they do.  

Taking aim at the Government, he told the podcast: ‘Our executive, the Cabinet, is generally speaking, spectacularly weak at administrative and intellectual skills’. 

He claimed to have even less respect for Labour and the Lib Dems, saying a Jo Swinson-led Government would be like a ‘rather preachy primary school’. 

Servicemen attend the annual Remembrance Sunday memorial. They are pictured above in full uniform yesterday morning

Servicemen attend the annual Remembrance Sunday memorial. They are pictured above in full uniform yesterday morning

Servicemen attend the annual Remembrance Sunday memorial. They are pictured above in full uniform yesterday morning

Officers are pictured yesterday during the parade in London as they listen to a brass band which were playing during the service

Officers are pictured yesterday during the parade in London as they listen to a brass band which were playing during the service

Officers are pictured yesterday during the parade in London as they listen to a brass band which were playing during the service 

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Asher Keddie reveals how she fell for her husband before suspecting he was hiding a dark secret

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Australian actress Asher Keddie fell instantly in love with husband Vincent Fantauzzo after passing each other by chance in a Melbourne street, but she soon realised he was hiding something from her when their relationship blossomed.  

Fantauzzo was a celebrated artist who rubbed shoulders with prime ministers and world-famous celebrities, painting the likes of the late Health Ledger and Lionel Rose.

But unknown to even his closest family, he had been diagnosed with a condition which made some of the most basic life skills a challenge.

Australian actress Asher Keddie has revealed how she fell in love with her famous artist husband Vincent Fantauzzo, but knew he was hiding a secret. (Pictured: the couple at the Fantauzzo Hotel launch in May)

Australian actress Asher Keddie has revealed how she fell in love with her famous artist husband Vincent Fantauzzo, but knew he was hiding a secret. (Pictured: the couple at the Fantauzzo Hotel launch in May)

Australian actress Asher Keddie has revealed how she fell in love with her famous artist husband Vincent Fantauzzo, but knew he was hiding a secret. (Pictured: the couple at the Fantauzzo Hotel launch in May)

Fantauzzo is a four-time Archibald People's Choice prize winning artist who's friendship circle includes ex-Prime Ministers and A-list Australian celebrities including Matt Moran and the late Heath ledger

Fantauzzo is a four-time Archibald People's Choice prize winning artist who's friendship circle includes ex-Prime Ministers and A-list Australian celebrities including Matt Moran and the late Heath ledger

Fantauzzo is a four-time Archibald People’s Choice prize winning artist who’s friendship circle includes ex-Prime Ministers and A-list Australian celebrities including Matt Moran and the late Heath ledger

Fantauzzo dropped out of school at the age of 13 without reading a single book and once carried a gun as he ‘hustled’ his way through life.

‘I spent my life hiding and hustling, feeling ashamed, not being good enough, not being smart enough and pretending to be someone I wasn’t,’ he told the ABC’s Australian Story. 

Fantauzzo saw Keddie on television and asked his friend, celebrated chef Matt Moran, if he knew that ‘hot’ girl because he wanted to paint her.

A few phone calls later, Keddie agreed.   

But Fantauzzo was late to their sitting and she had no time to waste due to her television commitments, so she hit the road.

Fantauzzo (pictured with model Jessica Hart) at his 30 Portraits 30 Days exhibition at The National Arts Club in New York in 2010

Fantauzzo (pictured with model Jessica Hart) at his 30 Portraits 30 Days exhibition at The National Arts Club in New York in 2010

Fantauzzo (pictured with model Jessica Hart) at his 30 Portraits 30 Days exhibition at The National Arts Club in New York in 2010

But the pair just happened to bump into each other in the street as Keddie was leaving.

‘I was walking towards him and I absolutely felt connected on a level I’d never felt connected to anybody in my life,’ Keddie said.

The pair married in 2014, becoming one of Australia’s most glamorous celebrity couples and had a son, Valentino, who is now four years old.

Keddie, however, knew something was not right with her talented husband, who suffered persistent memory issues, but he still didn’t let on.

‘He was trying to manage it himself and falling short. I started really demanding the truth, I suppose… I pushed pretty hard, which was uncomfortable for him and uncomfortable for me,’ Keddie said. 

Fantauzzo with his famous portrait of Heath Ledger. The portrait was painted in the weeks before Ledger's death to highlight the depth of Ledger's mental struggle

Fantauzzo with his famous portrait of Heath Ledger. The portrait was painted in the weeks before Ledger's death to highlight the depth of Ledger's mental struggle

Fantauzzo with his famous portrait of Heath Ledger. The portrait was painted in the weeks before Ledger’s death to highlight the depth of Ledger’s mental struggle

Fantauzzo finally revealed to the love of his life that he had been diagnosed with severe dyslexia in his 20s. 

‘Once I understood that memory is a genuine issue for him, I just started to let it go myself and my frustration started to dissipate,’ Keddie said, adding that in ways, her husband turns the condition into his strength. 

‘He has an extraordinary way of thinking and delivering in life. I’m kind of envious of it in a way. I look at him and I think, ”God, you just think about things in a way that my brain doesn’t”,’ she said.   

Celebrity chef Matt Moran poses with Fantauzzo and his portrait of Moran, which won the Packers Award in 2011

Celebrity chef Matt Moran poses with Fantauzzo and his portrait of Moran, which won the Packers Award in 2011

Celebrity chef Matt Moran poses with Fantauzzo and his portrait of Moran, which won the Packers Award in 2011

Fantauzzo grew up in various housing commission homes in Broadmeadows and Glenroy in North Melbourne with his four siblings and single parent mother after his father left when he was a boy. 

He was drawn to art from an early age, sketching cartoons as a boy before making caricatures of his teachers at school and developing his style and confidence in his artistic approach.

Fantauzzo’s famous works include striking portraits of Julia Gillard, Baz Luhrmann and Heath Ledger, with his work highlighting the depth of Ledger’s mental struggle was revealed one month after his death in 2008.

The artist has a hotel in Brisbane named after him, which is filled with his paintings. 

Fantauzzo, a four-time Archibald People’s Choice prize winning artist, likes to spend time with his subjects before painting them, adding a personal relationship to his creative idea before putting his brush on the canvas. 

Keddie believes that these personal encounters give life to Fantauzzo’s paintings by letting his subjects feel warm and comfortable with him to produce his imagery.

‘He is very vulnerable, a lot of his life has been spent hiding,’ Keddie says. ‘Yet he seeks the truth in his art and in his relationships.’ 

Keddie (pictured with Fantauzzo) suspected that her husband was hiding something from her

Keddie (pictured with Fantauzzo) suspected that her husband was hiding something from her

Keddie (pictured with Fantauzzo) suspected that her husband was hiding something from her

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Loose Women viewers back Jane Moore after she insists Brits should be proud to wear poppies

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Loose Women viewers have praised Jane Moore for insisting people should be encouraged to wear a poppy,  as a sign of ‘respect’ for veterans who fought for our ‘right to choose’. 

The panelist, 57, from Oxford, shared her view amid a discussion about whether you should be made to wear a poppy on Remembrance Sunday. 

The discussion came about after pub landlord Sean Donnelly, of the Three Lions pub in Bristol, told his staff that they couldn’t serve anyone on Sunday unless they were wearing a Royal British Legion poppy. 

Viewers were quick to agree with Jane claiming that wearing the symbol is showing your support for veterans, and insisting that the poppy doesn’t ‘glorify war’. 

Jane Moore, (pictured) 57,from Oxford,  appeared on Loose Women today where she said people should be encouraged to wear the poppy

Jane Moore, (pictured) 57,from Oxford,  appeared on Loose Women today where she said people should be encouraged to wear the poppy

Jane Moore, (pictured) 57,from Oxford,  appeared on Loose Women today where she said people should be encouraged to wear the poppy 

Queen Elizabeth II was pictured yesterday attending the annual Remembrance Sunday memorial at The Cenotaph

Queen Elizabeth II was pictured yesterday attending the annual Remembrance Sunday memorial at The Cenotaph

Queen Elizabeth II was pictured yesterday attending the annual Remembrance Sunday memorial at The Cenotaph 

Jane said: ‘I wouldn’t say forced, I would say encouraged. 

‘I think that pub landlord is great actually, because you have freedom of choice to not go into his pub if you don’t want to wear a poppy. 

‘But the reason you have that freedom of choice,  is that hundreds and thousands of young men – who didn’t have freedom of choice – fought for you to have that freedom of choice. 

 ‘So for me wearing a poppy is about respect, it’s not about glorifying war and it’s respect for people who fought in many many wars.’ 

Viewers were quick to agree with Jane, claiming that wearing the symbol is showing your support for veterans, and insisting that the poppy doesn't 'glorify war'

Viewers were quick to agree with Jane, claiming that wearing the symbol is showing your support for veterans, and insisting that the poppy doesn't 'glorify war'

Viewers were quick to agree with Jane, claiming that wearing the symbol is showing your support for veterans, and insisting that the poppy doesn’t ‘glorify war’

One viewer agreed: ‘Wearing it should always be a choice, because if it’s mandatory it loses its meaning. 

‘I disagree that it somehow ‘glorifies’ war, I really can’t understand how anyone could interpret it that way.’ 

Another shared their personal experience, commenting: ‘Daughter went to France in June as part of a project for history.

‘A group of 15-year-old’s fell silent when they entered the field as they didn’t really realise just how emotional It was going to be.

Pub landlord Sean Donnelly, of the Three Lions pub in Bristol, told his staff they can’t serve anyone on Sunday unless they are wearing a Royal British Legion poppy

Pub landlord Sean Donnelly, of the Three Lions pub in Bristol, told his staff they can’t serve anyone on Sunday unless they are wearing a Royal British Legion poppy

Pub landlord Sean Donnelly, of the Three Lions pub in Bristol, told his staff they can’t serve anyone on Sunday unless they are wearing a Royal British Legion poppy

‘They all respected the history of it, but found deeper respect after that day!’ 

Another simply commented: ‘Well said.’ 

One more commented: ‘I wear my poppy in respect for those who fought for me to have this choice. Respect is earned and they earned it.’ 

Jane continued to insist that school children should be educated more about the first and second World Wars. 

She said:’I also think it’s not about having to know the ins and outs of every battle and every war ship it’s just having a sense of the sacrifice – and children they learn. 

Fellow panelist Denise Welch, 61, (pictured left) agreed with Jane that veterans continue to need help from the British Legion

Fellow panelist Denise Welch, 61, (pictured left) agreed with Jane that veterans continue to need help from the British Legion

Fellow panelist Denise Welch, 61, (pictured left) agreed with Jane that veterans continue to need help from the British Legion 

Jane continued to insist that school children should be educated more about the first and second World Wars

Jane continued to insist that school children should be educated more about the first and second World Wars

Jane continued to insist that school children should be educated more about the first and second World Wars

‘You can do that with the first and second World Wars – go and see the cemeteries go and see the sacrifice with your own eyes. 

‘They have trenches at the Somme, the kids can see, bring it alive and let them understand the privileged lives they have not everybody has enjoyed. 

‘There are 40,000 soldiers still alive who have been medically discharged and they need help for life.’ 

However not everyone agreed with the poppy, with one viewer claiming the sight of the flower brings back memories of 'atrocities caused by the British army'

However not everyone agreed with the poppy, with one viewer claiming the sight of the flower brings back memories of 'atrocities caused by the British army'

However not everyone agreed with the poppy, with one viewer claiming the sight of the flower brings back memories of ‘atrocities caused by the British army’

However not everyone agreed with the poppy, with one viewer claiming the sight of the flower brings back memories of ‘atrocities caused by the British army’. 

They wrote: ‘Unfortunately when I see a poppy being worn by someone on television. All I think about is the atrocities caused by the British army in northern Ireland over many years

‘I don’t think enough of the British public fully know about the damage they did to a lot of people’s lives.’ 

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Wall at medieval Lewes Castle ‘collapses’ onto nearby buildings

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Police, paramedics and fire crews have been called to historic Lewes Castle in East Sussex where a section of the castle wall has collapsed onto nearby buildings. 

It is believed that one of the outer walls of the Sussex castle, which was built in the 11th century, collapsed after being loosened by the recent extreme weather. 

It is not yet known whether anyone was beneath the castle walls when the collapse took place and a large-scale search operation has been launched. 

A wall at Lewes Castle in East Sussex has fallen down today and rescue crews are searching for anyone who might be caught beneath the rubble

A wall at Lewes Castle in East Sussex has fallen down today and rescue crews are searching for anyone who might be caught beneath the rubble

A wall at Lewes Castle in East Sussex has fallen down today and rescue crews are searching for anyone who might be caught beneath the rubble

East Sussex Fire & Rescue Service said in a statement: ‘We are currently attending an incident at Lewes Castle, following reports of a wall collapse in the Old Coach House.

‘Lewes firefighters were initially mobilised at 12.22 today  and called further assistance from Sussex Police, South East Coast Ambulance, HART, Building Control, the Red Cross and specialist teams, including both Kent and West Sussex Urban Search & Rescue.

‘Residents are being asked to avoid the area, as there are expected to be a high number of emergency appliances involved in this multi-agency search and rescue operation.

‘Firefighters are working alongside other emergency services to check the area to ensure that no-one needs rescuing. Further updates will follow.’

Lewes Castle, built in 1068 by William de Warenne, the Ist Earl of Surrey, is a popular tourist attraction. 

The Norman castle occupies a commanding position on a man-made mount  overlooking the River Ouse. It was constructed of flint blocks and local limestone.

 

 

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