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Tinder is DOWN: Dating app crashes for frustrated singletons around the world 

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tinder is down dating app crashes for frustrated singletons around the world

Tinder, one of the world’s most popular dating app, appears to have crashed around the world. 

More than 1,000 users in the US and around 1,000 in the UK took to social media to bemoan the outage. 

More than half (57 per cent) of registered complaints relate to server issues, with a quarter (27 per cent) pertaining to difficulty sending and receiving messages.

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 The cause of the outage remains unknown, but singletons have voiced their discontent on social media. 

One user wrote: ‘I hears from an anonymous source that tinder is down… good thing I don’t have an account.’

Another wrote: ‘Why is tinder down I’m trying to find the love of my life’. 

MailOnline has contacted Tinder for comment.   

In October last year, Tinder launched ‘Face to Face’ video chats in the UK allowing users stuck in lockdown to go on virtual dates with people they have matched with. 

To prevent creeps and weirdos exploiting the feature to berate or harass their matches, video calling only becomes available when both parties opt in. 

It is designed to be used to compliment and boost conversation once a spark has been established. 

Tinder has trialled the feature in 13 countries, including some US states, France, Australia and Brazil. 

The company says it received positive feedback from users regarding the feature and as such has decided to roll the feature out worldwide. 

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HOW DID ONLINE DATING BECOME SO POPULAR?

The first ever incarnation of a dating app can be traced back to 1995 when Match.com was first launched.

The website allowed single people to upload a profile, a picture and chat to people online.

The app was intended to allow people looking for long-term relationships to meet.

eHarmony was developed in 2000 and two years later Ashley Madison, a site dedicated to infidelity and cheating, was first launched.

A plethora of other dating sites with a unique target demographic were set up in the next 10-15 years including: OKCupid (2004), Plenty of Fish (2006), Grindr (2009) and Happn (2013).

In 2012, Tinder was launched and was the first ‘swipe’ based dating platform. 

After its initial launch it’s usage snowballed and by March 2014 there were one billion matches a day, worldwide.

In 2014, co-founder of Tinder, Whitney Wolfe Herd launched Bumble, a dating app that empowered women by only allowing females to send the first message.

The popularity of mobile dating apps such as Tinder, Badoo and more recently Bumble is attributable to a growing amount of younger users with a busy schedule.

In the 1990s, there was a stigma attached to online dating as it was considered a last-ditch and desperate attempt to find love.

This belief has dissipated and now around one third of marriages are between couples who met online.

A survey from 2014 found that 84 per cent of dating app users were using online dating services to look for a romantic relationship.

Twenty-four per cent stated that that they used online dating apps explicitly for sexual encounters.

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This post first appeared on dailymail.co.uk

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