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Man falls onto road from back of moving West Perth police paddy wagon

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Dashcam has captured the moment a man appeared to roll out of the back of a moving police paddy wagon and onto a main road in Perth.

Footage taken on Sunday just before 2pm shows the police vehicle about to turn right at the Charles and Newcastle Street intersection in West Perth.

Watch the video above

Dashcam from a car in the adjacent lane shows the back door of the paddy wagon flying open.

Dashcam from a car in the adjacent lane shows the back door of the paddy wagon flying open.

A man then drops out of the back as the police vehicle drives away.

He can briefly be seen rolling onto the road before the car drives out of the shot.

More on 7NEWS.com.au

“Police forgot to lock the back door of there (sic) paddy wagon,” said the dashcam owner, who remains anonymous.

“Unfortunately the dashcam didn’t captcha (sic) him running away and the police chasing him down the freeway.”

The footage was posted on Facebook to the Dashcam Owners Australia page on Monday.

The footage was posted on Facebook to the Dashcam Owners Australia page on Monday.

7NEWS.com.au has contacted WA police for comment.

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Christmas holiday leave mythbuster: Can bosses say no to you taking time off?

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Bosses who refuse to grant their employees leave over the holiday period may be breaking the law.

Telling workers they can’t have time off over Christmas and New Year period because it’s ‘too busy’ is an ‘unreasonable’ excuse under the Fair Work Act. 

Most full-time workers in Australia get four weeks annual leave a year, in addition to their sick or personal leave entitlements, while shift workers are entitled to five weeks off.

While the Fair Work Act does not specifically cover annual leave bans, it does ensure that employers can not ‘unreasonably’ refuse the holiday requests of their workers.

Bosses who refuse to grant their employees leave over the holiday period without a good reason may be breaking the law (Stock image)

Bosses who refuse to grant their employees leave over the holiday period without a good reason may be breaking the law (Stock image)

Bosses who refuse to grant their employees leave over the holiday period without a good reason may be breaking the law (Stock image)

Whether a request is ‘reasonable’ depends on the individual case and depends on if an employee gives sufficient notice, and the nature of the business. 

Despite many employees complaining of having extended leave knocked back, there is neither a minimum or maximum amount of leave that can be taken at any one time. 

Full-time employees will continue to be paid during their annual leave, except in the instance where they and their employer agree to unpaid leave.

Their time off is paid at the normal hourly wage and they will not be paid overtime. 

Annual leave requests must always be made in advance of the leave being taken and in most workplaces require the signature of both the employer and employee.

Different rules apply to different industries, particularly when it comes to how much accrued leave is considered ‘excessive’.

In the construction industry, workers who have more than eight weeks accrued leave can apply for time off which must be approved by their employer.

This also applies to most hospitality workers, however only if they haven’t already got leave pending.  

Retail workers who have accrued more than eight weeks of leave are required to give at least eight weeks notice.

They must also take no less than one-week off at this time.

Most workers in Australia are granted four weeks of annual leave, in addition to their sick or personal leave entitlements (Stock image)

Most workers in Australia are granted four weeks of annual leave, in addition to their sick or personal leave entitlements (Stock image)

Most workers in Australia are granted four weeks of annual leave, in addition to their sick or personal leave entitlements (Stock image)

When it comes to sick and compassionate leave, all full and part-time employees are entitled to varying amounts of paid and unpaid time off.

All employees, except casuals, get 10 days sick and personal leave annually.

Australians can manage to get 16 days off this Christmas by taking just eight days of annual leave, when public holidays are taken into account.

In fact if you took your annual leave around public holidays and already existing long weekends, the standard 20 days off could be turned into as many as 55.

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Bizarre moment staff at a medical centre tricked by anti-vaxxer bully take down vaccination posters

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A militant anti-vaxxer filmed the moment he stormed into a doctors’ surgery and demanded staff remove posters advertising vaccinations.

The man told employees at the Melbourne surgery that they had breached Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) advertising guidelines.

He demanded that the posters, advertising vaccines for flu and whooping cough, be taken down immediately.

The activist recorded the confrontation on a seven-minute video which was uploaded to YouTube and Facebook on Sunday night by the group WeAreChange – Melbourne.

‘My name’s Jeff, I’m here to inform you that this surgery is in breach of TGA Guidelines,’ the man tells the stunned receptionist.

‘Advertising vaccine posters is a violation of their rules and regulations so I’m required to basically come here and inform you of that.’

He then hands over a copy of the Department of Health guidelines for advertising therapeutic goods, printed from the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) website.   

‘I’ve ordered some documentation so you can get a further understanding but I require these posters to be taken down immediately, if not further action will be taken,’ he said.   

The receptionist politely calls her boss, a doctor, who speaks to the man.

The staff appear unaware they are being filmed, and are clearly confused, believing the man to be an official.

Confused staff at the unidentified Melbourne medical centre took down the vaccination posters, mistakenly thinking they were being told to do so by someone with authority

Confused staff at the unidentified Melbourne medical centre took down the vaccination posters, mistakenly thinking they were being told to do so by someone with authority

Confused staff at the unidentified Melbourne medical centre took down the vaccination posters, mistakenly thinking they were being told to do so by someone with authority

 ‘I’m following up on complaints that have been made in regards to illegal advertising of vaccines that you have in the foyer,’ the activist tells the doctor.

‘It’s in direct violation of the TGA guidelines, it’s quite a serious offence.’

He then tells the doctor that if a patient had an injury from a vaccine that there would be ‘fines or repercussions’.

‘I’m sure you don’t want that so I require the promotional material to be taken down immediately otherwise further action will be taken,’ he said.

The man tells the doctor to take down the posters informing patients that flu and whooping cough vaccines are now available.

None of the posters taken down by the unknown medical centre in the video appear to have breached TGA guidelines. The bewildered staff appeared to be unaware they were on camera

None of the posters taken down by the unknown medical centre in the video appear to have breached TGA guidelines. The bewildered staff appeared to be unaware they were on camera

None of the posters taken down by the unknown medical centre in the video appear to have breached TGA guidelines. The bewildered staff appeared to be unaware they were on camera

The bewildered doctor asks the man whether the TGA recommends vaccination against the flu or not.

The activist primly tells him the vaccine posters are a violation of the TGA advertising code of conduct. 

‘So let’s deal with that now and let’s get them taken down shall we before anyone gets hurt or injured,’ he says.  

The doctor then instructs the receptionist to remove the posters for the man.

‘Thank you very much, doctor, for complying, and I hope they don’t appear again otherwise I’ll have to come back,’ the man says.

It is not clear whether the activist may be wearing some sort of uniform or name badge to trick the medical centre staff into thinking he has authority.  

Medical centre staff thought the man was simply doing his job by telling them to remove the posters. They did not realise he was a militant anti-vaxxer secretly filming them

Medical centre staff thought the man was simply doing his job by telling them to remove the posters. They did not realise he was a militant anti-vaxxer secretly filming them

Medical centre staff thought the man was simply doing his job by telling them to remove the posters. They did not realise he was a militant anti-vaxxer secretly filming them

As one of the medical receptionists takes down all the vaccine posters, she says: ‘I know you’re just doing your job’.

The man replies: ‘Yes, that’s right – as are you.’ 

This year more than 400 Australians died after contracting the flu virus.

Whooping cough is also on the rise and can cause pneumonia, uncontrollable coughing and even death.

Some strains of flu and whooping cough can be prevented by a vaccine.  

The Therapeutic Goods Administration says on its website that it does not regulate the advertising of health services, only of advertisements for therapeutic goods. 

According to its guidelines the TGA encourages medical centres to advertise vaccines, and recommends they inform the public of free vaccinations for at-risk groups such as pregnant women. 

None of the posters taken down by the unknown medical centre in the video appear to have breached the TGA guidelines.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the TGA for comment.

The video appears to have been secretly filmed, which potentially puts the activist in breach of Victoria’s Surveillance Devices Act 1999 as well as privacy laws. 

The YouTube video of the bizarre confrontation had been viewed 179 times by Monday and was uploaded to Facebook by user ‘Barney Alcock’.

Daily Mail Australia tried to contact Mr Alcock but had not received a response by time of writing.

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How Australian houses have shrunk to the smallest size in 17 years ending McMansion phenomenon

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Australian houses are no longer the biggest in the world and have shrunk to the smallest size on average in 17 years.

A typical home with a backyard now measures 228.8 square metres, data commissioned from the Australian Bureau of Statistics by margin lender CommSec found.

The average house size has shrunk by 1.3 per cent during the past year to be the smallest since 2002, as the population surges and more people of all ages opt for inner-city living.

Just seven years ago, Australia had the biggest freestanding houses in the world but they have been be overtaken by the United States.

Australian houses are no longer the biggest in the world and have shrunk to the smallest size in 17 years (pictured are houses in Sydney's west)

Australian houses are no longer the biggest in the world and have shrunk to the smallest size in 17 years (pictured are houses in Sydney's west)

Australian houses are no longer the biggest in the world and have shrunk to the smallest size in 17 years (pictured are houses in Sydney’s west)

CommSec senior economist Ryan Felsman said downsizing baby boomers and the preference of young people to live closer to the city was causing a decline in the phenomenon of the McMansion – a large house on a small block.

‘Certainly millennials and Generation Z are less inclined to want a larger house and certainly there’s a preference to live closer to the city, to be closer to work, less commuting times,’ he told Daily Mail Australia on Monday.

‘With an ageing population, we’ve got downsizing taking place by baby boomers at the moment so they’re looking to move to apartments and townhouses.’ 

Sydney’s expensive house prices meant the McMansion phenomenon among new buildings was being confined to the city’s north-western outskirts and new suburbs, like Oran Park, a former raceway 60km south-west of the central business district. 

Median prices in Australia’s biggest city now stand at $918,314, CoreLogic data showed, limiting the choices of people wanting a backyard as the population increased and land became scare. 

In May, Mark Steinert, the chief executive of residential building group Stockland, predicted Sydney could run out of land for new housing within a decade.

CommSec senior economist Ryan Felsman said downsizing baby boomers and the preference of young people to live closer to the city was causing a decline in the phenomenon of the McMansion - a large house on a small block (pictured is a small backyard at Oran Park in Sydney's south-west)

CommSec senior economist Ryan Felsman said downsizing baby boomers and the preference of young people to live closer to the city was causing a decline in the phenomenon of the McMansion - a large house on a small block (pictured is a small backyard at Oran Park in Sydney's south-west)

CommSec senior economist Ryan Felsman said downsizing baby boomers and the preference of young people to live closer to the city was causing a decline in the phenomenon of the McMansion – a large house on a small block (pictured is a small backyard at Oran Park in Sydney’s south-west)

Average Australian house sizes

New South Wales: 221.8 square metres

Victoria: 246 square metres

Queensland: 223 square metres

South Australia: 198 square metres

Western Australia: 225.3 square metres

Tasmania: 178.5 square metres

Northern Territory: 200.5 square metres

Australian Capital Territory: 250.8 square metres

NATIONAL: 228.8 square metres

Source: CommSec Home Size Trends report released November 11, 2019 

Hemmed in by the Blue Mountains to the west and national parks to the north and south, there was little room for further expansion. 

‘Sydney is constrained by geography,’ Mr Felsman said.  

As a result, average New South Wales house sizes are 221.8 square metres, which is almost 10 per cent smaller than Victoria’s 246 square metres. 

This meant Melbourne and Canberra were still the home of the McMansion, in cities where median house prices are $751,513 and $671,968, respectively.

The Australian Capital Territory, the home of public servants on large salaries, had the largest average house size of 250.8 square metres.

‘We have seen strong jobs growth in the public sector take place in the last five years so that’s contributed to those houses being built down there increasing in terms of their square-metre size,’ Mr Felsman said.

Sydney's expensive house prices meant the McMansion phenomenon among new buildings was being confined to the city's north-western outskirts and new suburbs, like Oran Park (pictured), a former raceway 60km south-west of the central business district

Sydney's expensive house prices meant the McMansion phenomenon among new buildings was being confined to the city's north-western outskirts and new suburbs, like Oran Park (pictured), a former raceway 60km south-west of the central business district

Sydney’s expensive house prices meant the McMansion phenomenon among new buildings was being confined to the city’s north-western outskirts and new suburbs, like Oran Park (pictured), a former raceway 60km south-west of the central business district

What is a McMansion?

The term is used to mock mass produced houses that lack style and architectural flair.

They typically have narrow eaves on the side, which do little to keep the home cool in summer, and look very similar to other homes in the same street.

Houses of this nature are also so big they almost touch the neighbouring house. 

The pejorative term evokes the name of American fast food chain McDonald’s and suggests the dwelling lacks individuality. 

Generation X parents, in their forties and fifties, were the ones now more likely to own a McMansion with four bedrooms.

‘It’s really Generation X that are still raising families in three, four-bedroom houses with young kids,’ Mr Felsman said. 

During the last financial year, average houses built in Queensland shrunk to 223 square metres, the smallest in 21 years.

In Tasmania, floor space for freestanding homes was squeezed to 178.5 square metres, the smallest since 1996. 

Australian houses are still among the biggest in the world but they five per cent smaller than in the US.

While houses are getting smaller, apartments are getting bigger, growing by 3.2 per cent during the past year to 128.8 square metres. 

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