Connect with us

News

New fingerprinting technology will reveal whether someone has recently used heroin

Published

on

New advanced technology that can tell whether a person has used heroin even if they wash their hands could help police identify drug users and dealers.

A forensic test developed by scientists in the UK is able to distinguish between those who have taken the Class A drug or unintentionally come into contact with it by shaking hands with someone else who has handled it.

Researchers from the University of Surrey were able to build the tool using fingerprint samples from 10 patients seeking treatment at a drug rehabilitation clinic who had used heroin or cocaine in the previous 24 hours.

Researchers from the University of Surrey were able to build the tool using fingerprint samples from 10 patients seeking treatment at a drug rehabilitation clinic (file image)

Researchers from the University of Surrey were able to build the tool using fingerprint samples from 10 patients seeking treatment at a drug rehabilitation clinic (file image)

Researchers from the University of Surrey were able to build the tool using fingerprint samples from 10 patients seeking treatment at a drug rehabilitation clinic (file image) 

Participants were asked to wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water before putting on disposable gloves for ten minutes to make their hands sweat and provide another fingerprint sample.

The same process was carried out with 50 volunteers who declared themselves as non-drug users, allowing scientists to differentiate between substances from each group.

Dr Melanie Bailey, co-author of the paper published in The Journal of Analytical Toxicology said: ‘Our team here at the University of Surrey believes that the technology we are developing will make our communities safer and shorten the route for those who need help to beat their addictions.

The team has previously applied similar technology to uncover signs of cocaine use (file image)

The team has previously applied similar technology to uncover signs of cocaine use (file image)

The team has previously applied similar technology to uncover signs of cocaine use (file image)

‘We also believe the technology has scope in other areas, such as confirming whether a patient is taking their medication.’

Fellow researcher Catia Costa added: ‘Our results have shown that this non-invasive and innovative technology is sensitive enough to identify Class A drugs in several scenarios – even after people have washed their hands using varying methods.

‘Crucially, our study shows that the process of hand washing is important when trying to assess whether someone has used a Class A drug.’

The team has previously applied similar technology to uncover signs of cocaine use.

In August, the National Crime Agency made the largest ever seizure of heroin in Felixstowe, nearly 1.3 tonnes with a street value of more than £120 million.

News

Women should sit like men to prevent hip and knee pain, surgeon says

Published

on

By

Women should ‘manspread’ – instead of sitting cross-legged – to prevent developing knee and hip pain, a top orthopedic surgeon says. 

Barbara Bergin MD sees thousands of patients a year who are struggling with pain under their knee-caps and in their hips – and 90 percent of them are women. 

Dr Bergin, who practices in Austin, Texas, believes the driving factor is that women have been trained that it is ‘ladylike’ to sit with their knees together, which twists the femur, putting strain on the joints and the supporting muscles. 

Men, meanwhile, tend to sit with their legs spread and their feet firmly on the ground (so-called ‘manspreading’), keeping their body aligned and stable, and stand firmly on both feet, rather than leaning to one side. 

In fact, Dr Bergin says, male standing and sitting positions are even better for women than men, because their wider pelvises naturally rotate the femur in.

Men typically sit with their feet flat on the ground, allowing their tendons to relax, while women have long been trained to sit cross-legged, causing stiffening

Men typically sit with their feet flat on the ground, allowing their tendons to relax, while women have long been trained to sit cross-legged, causing stiffening

Men typically sit with their feet flat on the ground, allowing their tendons to relax, while women have long been trained to sit cross-legged, causing stiffening

Dr Barbara Bergin, an orthopedic surgeon who practices in Austin, Texas, advises women to embrace classically male sitting positions to prevent the onset of knee and hip pain

Dr Barbara Bergin, an orthopedic surgeon who practices in Austin, Texas, advises women to embrace classically male sitting positions to prevent the onset of knee and hip pain

Dr Barbara Bergin, an orthopedic surgeon who practices in Austin, Texas, advises women to embrace classically male sitting positions to prevent the onset of knee and hip pain

‘I’m not suggesting you S.L.A.M. [sit like a man] constantly,’ Dr Bergin said. 

‘I still think it’s best to keep legs shut when wearing a skirt and in the presence of men. It’s just proper and ladylike. But 90 percent of the time, sitting like a man is fine, and certainly better for your health.’  

Leg-crossing is relatively recent behavior for women. 

Women have been taught to sit with their knees together since at least the 1300s as a sign of chastity, etiquette expert Myka Meier told the Washington Post.  

But with floor-length skirts it wasn’t vital. And, in fact, some Victorian-era etiquette guides said it was unbecoming for women to cross their legs because it could cause them to slouch or sit at a slant; better to have both feet planted on the ground. Indeed, portraits show Queen Victoria favored a man-spread. 

That all changed as the 1900s rolled on, and skirt lengths ascended to mid-calf, then past the knee. Then, it was considered ladylike – even essential – for women to cross or knock their knees. 

Whether your feet are on the ground or not, keeping the knees together puts undue stress on two key tendons that are responsible for chronic pain: the iliotibial (IT) band that runs along the outside of the leg, and the greater trochanter which runs around your hips.   

Queen Victoria was partial to a so-called 'manspread'

Queen Victoria was partial to a so-called 'manspread'

Knocking the knees has been seen as a ladylike sign of chastity since the 1300s, and became commonplace once skirt lengths crept up past the knees

Knocking the knees has been seen as a ladylike sign of chastity since the 1300s, and became commonplace once skirt lengths crept up past the knees

Queen Victoria was partial to a so-called ‘manspread’, but knocking the knees has been seen as a ladylike sign of chastity since the 1300s, and became commonplace once skirt lengths crept up past the knees 

IT band syndrome, a painful knee condition, occurs when the ligament tightens so much that it rubs the bones. It can be caused by running – a common injury for marathon runners – but it is most strained in a sitting position, with the bent knee pulling the tendon. Crossing or knocking the knees exacerbates it.

The best antidote is to avoid sitting. But if you need to sit, do so with your feet flat on the ground, your legs slightly apart (Dr Bergin, author of the book Sit Like A Man, recommends thinking of 11 and 1 on a clock), and your knees level with or below your hips, to allow the IT band to stretch. 

Greater tronchateric pain syndrome (or, lateral hip pain) causes pain to shoot down the sides of the hips and the thighs, even as far as the knees, and can be debilitating. 

The main causes are: sitting for long periods, leaning on one leg rather than the other, and crossing the knees. It is particularly common among women over 40, who are already prone to hip strain due to their wider pelvises, more commonly sit with crossed legs, and lean when standing. 

Embracing a more male sitting or standing stance, Dr Bergin says, will alleviate much of that pain and tension. 

Channeling a new stance may not feel that comfortable, though, warns Dr Cordelia Carter, orthopedic surgeon and Director of the Center for Women’s Sports Health at NYU Langone. 

Yes, there are cultural reasons women have come to sit cross-legged, but it’s also physiological.

‘It’s partly how we are built. It’s more common for women to have residual femoral anteversions – internal rotation of the hips – so it’s easy and more comfortable [to bend than to stand steady],’ Dr Carter told DailyMail.com.

‘The problem is when we develop imbalances. If it’s more comfortable to sit legs-crossed, you may be worsening other parts by not working those external muscles.’

Sitting with your legs firmly on the ground is certainly recommended to help keep the hips straight and maintain the natural curve in your spine, but Dr Carter says it is most important not to sit for too long, regardless of what position you’re in. 

‘Sitting at our desks for too long is a problem. In any position, it’s a problem.’ 

The antidote? Dr Carter recommends yoga. 

‘Yoga is fantastic because it works on body recognition and body awareness to help gain that balance.’ 

Continue Reading

News

SA on ‘high alert’ as wind change on Yorke Peninsula could threaten homes and lives

Published

on

By

South Australia’s bushfire emergency has eased in some areas with authorities downgrading warnings on the worst of more than 40 fires across the state.

However, residents in Price and Port Clinton on the upper Yorke Peninsula were urged to be on the alert for a wind change in the early hours of Thursday that could threaten homes and lives.

Watch the video above

In the most serious blaze on the peninsula, some houses and sheds are thought to have been lost to a fire that threatened the lives of about 1,000 people living in the Yorketown area.

The fire started close to homes on Wednesday as the state sweltered through catastrophic conditions, with soaring temperatures and high winds.

The loss of property was yet to be confirmed but there were reports a number of houses had been destroyed.

There were no immediate reports of any injuries with the fire burning mostly in stubble.

Watch and act

Late on Wednesday, the Country Fire Service downgraded the alert for Yorketown from an emergency warning to a watch and act.

But it said the blaze was yet to be contained as it burned on two fronts, in a westerly direction towards Port Moorowie and in an easterly direction towards Edithburgh, Coobowie and Port Giles.

More on 7NEWS.com.au

A number of other fires across SA on Wednesday prompted emergency warnings, including a second blaze on Yorke Peninsula, two others north of Adelaide and one in the Barossa Valley. They were later downgraded.

A cool change was expected to sweep across the state by dawn but the CFS warned the dangerous conditions would linger.

The Bureau of Meteorology had a severe weather warning in place for potentially damaging winds across a wide area, including most of the York and Eyre peninsulas and the Adelaide Hills.

It said wind gusts of up to 90km/h were possible as the cold front moved through.

Continue Reading

News

Millie Bobby Brown promotes children’s rights at UN summit

Published

on

By

Millie Bobby Brown and David Beckham spoke at a global summit at the United Nations Headquarters in New York in demanding action to protect and promote children’s rights.

The Stranger Things actress, 15, took to the stage on Wednesday at the summit which was part of the celebrations marking World Children’s Day and gave a speech about her experience of being bullied. 

The summit coincides with 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history.

Event: Millie Bobby Brown, 15, spoke at a global summit at the United Nations Headquarters in New York in demanding action to protect and promote children's rights

Event: Millie Bobby Brown, 15, spoke at a global summit at the United Nations Headquarters in New York in demanding action to protect and promote children's rights

Event: Millie Bobby Brown, 15, spoke at a global summit at the United Nations Headquarters in New York in demanding action to protect and promote children’s rights

Millie, who is UNICEF’s (United Nations Children’s Fund) youngest Goodwill Ambassador, said: ‘Young people my age are facing so many new challenges today that 30 years ago were hard to predict.

‘I’m proud to add my voice to all those around the world who are asking for solutions to today’s problems such as bullying, access to education, mental health awareness, suicide prevention and climate change.

‘In world capitals, in buildings like this, adults talk about children’s rights. But today, young people don’t want to be talked about. They want to do the talking. In the words of one young person: “Be an active voice. Don’t let things go unnoticed.’

Speaker: David Beckham, 44, headlined the global summit which was part of the celebrations marking World Children's Day

Speaker: David Beckham, 44, headlined the global summit which was part of the celebrations marking World Children's Day

Speaker: David Beckham, 44, headlined the global summit which was part of the celebrations marking World Children’s Day

Millie recalled her experience with being bullied in schools and said it was so bad at one point that she was sometimes scared to go.  

She said: ‘So today, I want to talk about an issue that is very personal to me. Something that so often goes unnoticed – but causes real suffering. Bullying.

‘Like David, I’ve been very lucky in my life. I take nothing for granted. But I also know what it feels like to be vulnerable. At school, I was bullied by a group of students. I remember feeling helpless. School used to be a safe place. Now I was scared to go.

‘I was lucky. With the help of my friends, family and people around me, I was able to overcome these negative feelings and take my power back. But millions of children aren’t so lucky. They’re still struggling in the darkness. 

‘Wrestling with fear. With insecurity. Bullying and online threats are never harmless. Never just words. It puts children’s mental health at risk. It causes stress. And in the most extreme cases, and in areas around the world where conflict and violence are daily threats, it can lead to self-harm. Sickness. And even suicide.

Success: The actress is Unicef's youngest Goodwill Ambassador and was interviewed after her speech

Success: The actress is Unicef's youngest Goodwill Ambassador and was interviewed after her speech

Success: The actress is Unicef’s youngest Goodwill Ambassador and was interviewed after her speech 

‘In my role as Goodwill Ambassador, I will continue talking about this issue wherever I go. Every one of you here today can be the loudspeaker that turns our voices into real change. 

‘Into policies, programmes, laws and investments that keep children safe. That makes our world a better, healthier, stronger place for all.’

Fellow ambassador David, 44, who opened the event with his speech, spoke about his childhood dreams of becoming a footballer.

The sports star asked for more to be done to help children all over the world achieve their dreams as the future ‘belongs to children’.

Suave: David looked dapper in a grey blazer and matching trousers which he wore with a crisp white shirt and a navy tie

Suave: David looked dapper in a grey blazer and matching trousers which he wore with a crisp white shirt and a navy tie

Suave: David looked dapper in a grey blazer and matching trousers which he wore with a crisp white shirt and a navy tie

Suave: David looked dapper in a grey blazer and matching trousers which he wore with a crisp white shirt and a navy tie

Suave: David looked dapper in a grey blazer and matching trousers which he wore with a crisp white shirt and a navy tie

He said: ‘I always dreamed of being a professional footballer. It was all I ever wanted. And unlike many children around the world, I was incredibly lucky.

‘From a very young age, I had people in my corner who believed in me, who wanted me to succeed, and who helped me to reach my goals. Since 2001, I’ve worked with UNICEF, meeting girls and boys from all over the world. 

‘Girls and boys with different stories and backgrounds from my own. But like all children, they have one thing in common. They have ambitions, and they have dreams for a better future.

‘Over the years, I have seen how UNICEF is helping to make these ambitions real. By delivering health, nutrition, water and sanitation, plus education. All of the ingredients that children need to grow up healthy and happy, and to unlock their full potential. 

‘But as leaders, as public figures, as parents, and of course, as human beings, we must do more to protect children’s dreams. Because the future doesn’t belong to us. It belongs to children.

Summit: In his speech, David said: 'Children everywhere dream of a better future'

Summit: In his speech, David said: 'Children everywhere dream of a better future'

Summit: In his speech, David said: ‘Children everywhere dream of a better future’ 

‘Please join me in this mission for children, and let’s listen to our young people, because they will show us the way. I am proud to be here lending my voice to this conversation and supporting brilliant young activists like Millie Bobbie Brown who is using her platform to command attention to the cause. 

‘Today on World Children’s Day, let’s make new promises to children of the world. We promise to listen to you. We promise to learn from you. We promise to act for you and together, we promise to work harder to protect your dreams.  

‘Children everywhere dream of a better future. I have worked with UNICEF for almost 20 years and I have met children in all corners of the world, young people that have ambitions for a better education, a life free from disease and for peace. 

‘All children deserve the opportunity to reach their potential and I’m very proud to support the young people speaking up for change today.’

He also said: 'I have worked with UNICEF for almost 20 years and I have met children in all corners of the world...

He also said: 'I have worked with UNICEF for almost 20 years and I have met children in all corners of the world...

He also said: ‘I have worked with UNICEF for almost 20 years and I have met children in all corners of the world…

David added: 'All children deserve the opportunity to reach their potential and I¿m very proud to support the young people speaking up for change today'

David added: 'All children deserve the opportunity to reach their potential and I¿m very proud to support the young people speaking up for change today'

David added: ‘All children deserve the opportunity to reach their potential and I’m very proud to support the young people speaking up for change today’

Good cause: David and Millie sat in the audience as they listened to to other speaker's at the event

Good cause: David and Millie sat in the audience as they listened to to other speaker's at the event

Good cause: David and Millie sat in the audience as they listened to to other speaker’s at the event 

Millie said: 'Young people my age are facing so many new challenges today that 30 years ago were hard to predict'

Millie said: 'Young people my age are facing so many new challenges today that 30 years ago were hard to predict'

Millie said: 'Young people my age are facing so many new challenges today that 30 years ago were hard to predict'

Millie said: 'Young people my age are facing so many new challenges today that 30 years ago were hard to predict'

Millie said: ‘Young people my age are facing so many new challenges today that 30 years ago were hard to predict’ 

She added: 'I¿m proud to add my voice to all those around the world who are asking for solutions to today¿s problems'

She added: 'I¿m proud to add my voice to all those around the world who are asking for solutions to today¿s problems'

She added: ‘I’m proud to add my voice to all those around the world who are asking for solutions to today’s problems’ 

World Children’s Day, which is celebrated on 20 November every year, aims to raise awareness and funds for the millions of children that are denied their right to adequate health care, nutrition, education and protection. 

Millie has risen to fame since starring as Eleven in the hit Netflix series Stranger Things, which debuted in 2016.

The British teen co-stars alongside Gaten Matarazzo, Finn Wolfhard, Caleb McLaughlin and Noah Schnapp.

The star previously sad that the cast were crying for real when someone questioned how they would all feel when Stranger Things eventually wraps during filming of an emotional scene in the most recent season finale. 

She explained: ‘And we all started crying and then they rolled camera and said action. 

‘And that was it. We all started saying goodbye to each other. We felt too real.’

Career: Millie has risen to fame since starring as Eleven in the hit Netflix series Stranger Things, which debuted in 2016

Career: Millie has risen to fame since starring as Eleven in the hit Netflix series Stranger Things, which debuted in 2016

Career: Millie has risen to fame since starring as Eleven in the hit Netflix series Stranger Things, which debuted in 2016 

Cast: The British teen co-stars alongside Gaten Matarazzo, Finn Wolfhard, Caleb McLaughlin and Noah Schnapp

Cast: The British teen co-stars alongside Gaten Matarazzo, Finn Wolfhard, Caleb McLaughlin and Noah Schnapp

Cast: The British teen co-stars alongside Gaten Matarazzo, Finn Wolfhard, Caleb McLaughlin and Noah Schnapp 

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2019 DiazHub.