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Adele brings concert to halt as fan faints in resurfaced video prompting new outrage over Astroworld

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A video of Adele abruptly halting a concert has resurfaced, prompting fresh outrage over Travis Scott‘s Astroworld concert in Houston, Texas on Friday that left eight people dead.

A TikTok user has shared old footage of Adele singing her hit Rolling In The Deep during her run of shows at Hammersmith Apollo in 2011 when the megastar, 33, noticed someone had fainted in the audience.

Adele immediately stopped singing and sent medics into the crowd to help. The video has been viewed millions of times and beneath the footage comments including: ‘Someone send this to Travis. He gotta learn a thing or two from Adele,’ quickly accumulated.

Adele says in the video: ‘Stop, stop, stop — someone’s fainted again. Excuse me, medic, right in the middle.’ 

Resurfaced: A video of Adele, 33, abruptly halting a concert has resurfaced, prompting fresh outrage over Travis Scott's Astroworld concert in Houston, Texas on Friday that left eight dead

Resurfaced: A video of Adele, 33, abruptly halting a concert has resurfaced, prompting fresh outrage over Travis Scott’s Astroworld concert in Houston, Texas on Friday that left eight dead

Attempting to direct the medical team to the person in need, Adele added: ‘Can you see? Can someone act like they care, please? Someone’s fainted over there.’

She also checked in on the unwell show-goer, shouting from stage: ‘Is anyone coming to you?’

As medics attempted to reach the guest, Adele could be heard asking crowds to move out of their way.

Tragic: Eight fans, including a 14-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl, were crushed to death at 30-year-old Scott's Astroworld Festival on Friday night

Tragic: Eight fans, including a 14-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl, were crushed to death at 30-year-old Scott’s Astroworld Festival on Friday night

Old footage: A TikTok user shared old footage of Adele singing her hit Rolling In The Deep during her run of shows at Hammersmith Apollo in 2011

Old footage: A TikTok user shared old footage of Adele singing her hit Rolling In The Deep during her run of shows at Hammersmith Apollo in 2011

Quick response: Adele immediately stopped singing and sent medics into the crowd to help when she noticed someone had fainted

Quick response: Adele immediately stopped singing and sent medics into the crowd to help when she noticed someone had fainted 

Once certain the attendee was being tended to, the superstar began her son again, telling the crowd: ‘Thank you. Guys, this is Rolling in the Deep!’

MailOnline has reached out to both representatives for Adele and Travis Scott for comment.

The clip was posted alongside the caption: ‘[She] didn’t carry on until she knew they were safe.’

Beneath the footage, one social media user wrote: ‘Oh wow look how easy it is to stop a concert,’ while another added: ‘This is how you genuinely care for your fans at a show.’

Critical comments: Beneath the footage, one social media user wrote: 'Oh wow look how easy it is to stop a concert'

Critical comments: Beneath the footage, one social media user wrote: ‘Oh wow look how easy it is to stop a concert’

Other comments included: ‘She noticed one person. So tell me how he failed to miss so many’, ‘She didn’t even hesitate or think about it. It’s just that easy to stop a concert’ and ‘To the people saying he didn’t know, Adele noticed one person faint so I’m pretty sure he would have noticed eight bodies.’

Eight fans, including a 14-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl, were crushed to death at the Astroworld Festival on Friday night.

Scott, 30, continued to perform for up to 30 minutes as people were killed and crowds chanted ‘stop the show.’

The show was called off 30 minutes before schedule, but half an hour after a ‘mass casualty event’ had already been declared by the fire department.

Still performing: Scott continued to perform for up to 30 minutes as people were killed and crowds chanted 'stop the show'

Still performing: Scott continued to perform for up to 30 minutes as people were killed and crowds chanted ‘stop the show’ 

The concert had a crowd of 50,000 people with a surge toward the stage happening at 9:38 pm local time in Houston.

Local firefighters and police called it a ‘mass casualty’ at that time, which took place 32 mins after Travis’ set began.

During the surge, eight fans including a 14-year-old boy and a 16-year-old girl were crushed to death.

Several concert-goers suffered cardiac arrests and one person, a police officer, was stabbed with a hypodermic needle.

Scott has since pledged to refund all 50,000 attendees who bought tickets to Astroworld. He was set to perform at another festival this Saturday, but sources told Variety that he will no longer appear because he is ‘too distraught to play.’

Crowds: The concert had a crowd of 50,000 people with a surge toward the stage happening at 9:38 pm local time in Houston

Crowds: The concert had a crowd of 50,000 people with a surge toward the stage happening at 9:38 pm local time in Houston 

On Saturday night, Scott spoke out in the wake of the tragedy, saying on his Instagram Stories: ‘My fans really mean the world to me and I always want to leave them with a positive experience.’

He went on: ‘Anytime I can make out anything that’s going on, ya know, I stop the show and you know, help them get the help they need. I could just never imagine the severity of the situation.’  

‘To the ones that was lost last night, we’re working right now to ID the families so we can help assist them through this tough time,’ the rapper shared.

‘I’m honestly just devastated… I could never imagine anything like this just happening.’

Scott said he is working closely with local authorities as they investigate the crowd surge and encouraged anyone with information about the deadly incident to come forward.  

‘We’ve been working closely with everyone to just try to get to the bottom of this,’ he said. ‘If you have any information please just contact the local authorities.’

He promised his followers he would continue to keep them informed about the investigation and told them: ‘Every just continue to keep your prayers.’

Speaking out: On Saturday night, Scott spoke out in the wake of the tragedy, saying on his Instagram Stories: 'My fans really mean the world to me'

Speaking out: On Saturday night, Scott spoke out in the wake of the tragedy, saying on his Instagram Stories: ‘My fans really mean the world to me’ 

Scott also says he’ll cover the funeral costs for the eight people killed as he’s hit with a slew of lawsuits from surviving victims who accuse him of causing ‘extreme distress’.   

A number of injury lawyers, including famed civil rights attorney Ben Crump, are claiming that Scott, Live Nation and other parties behind the festival failed to provide the necessary security measures to prevent the stampede that injured hundreds of people, in addition to the eight fatalities.

As 11 more lawsuits poured in on Monday, Scott announced that he will be partnering with BetterHelp to supply free one-on-one online therapy to any concertgoers impacted by the tragic events at Astroworld.   

But attendees and their lawyers, including Crump – who is representing Noah Gutierrez, 21 – said that the tragedy was ‘years in the making’ because of a history of injuries reported at Scott’s performances, including three hospitalizations at the same event in 2019.

The lawsuits also allege that Scott kept singing for more than 30 minutes despite numerous deaths, injuries and screams from fans for the show to stop.

Legal action: A number of injury lawyers, including famed civil rights attorney Ben Crump, are claiming that Scott, Live Nation and other parties behind the festival failed to provide the necessary security measures to prevent the stampede

Legal action: A number of injury lawyers, including famed civil rights attorney Ben Crump, are claiming that Scott, Live Nation and other parties behind the festival failed to provide the necessary security measures to prevent the stampede

‘We are hearing horrific accounts of the terror and helplessness people experienced, the horror of a crushing crowd and the awful trauma of watching people die while trying to save them,’ Crump said in a statement.  

He set up a designated website for anyone else traumatized by the experience to reach out for legal assistance, which could be found at astroworldclaimshelp.com.

‘We will be pursuing justice for all our clients who were harmed in this tragic and preventable event,’ he added.

Amid his lawsuits, Crump tweeted one TikTok video showing members of the crowd scream for the show to stop and another of a woman climbing a stage ladder and screaming to a stage hand that people were dying in the crowd.

Social media: Crump tweeted one TikTok video showing members of the crowd scream for the show to stop

Social media: Crump tweeted one TikTok video showing members of the crowd scream for the show to stop

Tweets: He shared another video of a woman climbing a stage ladder and screaming to a stage hand that people were dying in the crowd

Tweets: He shared another video of a woman climbing a stage ladder and screaming to a stage hand that people were dying in the crowd

Travis Scott said he will cover the funeral costs for the eight victims killed during a violent crowd surge at his Astroworld Festival on Friday in Houston, Texas

One tweet was captioned, ‘Crowd desperately chanting ‘stop the show’ and waving their hands in the air in an attempt to stop the Astroworld festival! If you know anyone who’s been affected by this horrifying event, reach out ASAP.’

And another read, ‘WOW. A young girl climbed a ladder to beg staff to stop the Astroworld fest & help attendees with what we now know were DOZENS of medical emergencies & deaths! Please reach out if you or a loved one has suffered from this devastating event!’  

Meanwhile, Houston lawyer Sean Roberts filed seven lawsuits on Monday on behalf of various survivors. Each claims that Scott and Live Nation failed to provide adequate security, a contingency plan and the necessary conditions to prevent the environment that led to the fatalities and injuries, according to TMZ, which obtained a copy of the suits.

Roberts, who listed that each client was ‘seriously and permanently injured,’ is suing for negligence, and wants an unspecified amount in damages for each of his clients.

Surge: Around 2pm hundreds of fans stormed the festival's VIP entrance. About seven hours later the surge in front of the main stage killed eight people but the two events appear to be unrelated

Surge: Around 2pm hundreds of fans stormed the festival’s VIP entrance. About seven hours later the surge in front of the main stage killed eight people but the two events appear to be unrelated

Ryan MacLeod, another attorney taking legal action, said his client is dealing with extreme distress on multiple fronts, CNN reported. MacLeod told the news outlet, ‘There’s the physical pain, but even kind of greater… is the emotional trauma from this, the emotional scarring, that sort of silent pain.’

He said that his client was ‘trapped’ in the crowd and ‘felt like he was drowning’ and like he ‘couldn’t breathe.’

‘Then, he was trampled and there was a hero, as many of these concertgoers turned out to be, who was able to lift him and get him out to safety,’ he added.

MacLeod cited casualties reported at Scott’s shows dating back to 2015, when Scott was hit with misdemeanour charges after a violent stampede at Lollapalooza in Chicago.

The lawyer said, ‘This was years in the making. Travis Scott and his promoters know very well from at least 2015, Travis has been arrested for inciting violence. Oftentimes when there’s a mosh pit at one of his concerts, he will proudly say this isn’t a mosh pit unless someone’s getting hurt.’  

While Scott maintains that he wasn’t aware of the tragedy until after performing, MacLeod insists that the music should have stopped sooner. He said, ‘During the concert, even when first responders are trying to respond, he continues the concert. It’s disgusting. It’s despicable. We’re better than this as humans.’

MacLeod added, ‘If you have a pulse and you’re alive, as Travis Scott was that night, and you’ve got the microphone in your hand and you’re in charge and you identify that there’s a life and death… and you don’t stop? You are putting profits over safety… CPR was literally being administered while he’s still singing… that cannot ever happen again.’

Manuel Souza, another concertgoer, filed a suit with the law firm Kherkher Garcia and seeks $1,000,000 in monetary relief alleging that he ‘suffered serious bodily injuries when the uncontrolled crowd at the concert knocked him to the ground and trampled him.’

Steve Kherkher, Souza’s attorney, told CNN that the ‘Defendants failed to properly plan and conduct the concert in a safe manner. Instead, they consciously ignored the extreme risks of harm to concertgoers, and, in some cases actively encouraged and fomented dangerous behaviours.’

Therapy: Scott also announced that he will be partnering with BetterHelp to supply free one-on-one online therapy to any concertgoers

Therapy: Scott also announced that he will be partnering with BetterHelp to supply free one-on-one online therapy to any concertgoers

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