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Eaton death: Homicide detectives investigate after man with ‘significant injuries’ found dead

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Homicide detectives are investigating after a man was found dead in Western Australia’s south-west region.

Police were called to the property in the Bunbury suburb of Eaton on Thursday night and found a man deceased.

WA Police were met with what they described as a “confronting situation” after receiving multiple calls from the public.

“Police were called to a residence on Cleveland Bay Avenue around 8.20pm last night (21 May 2020), where they located the man deceased,” WA Police said in a statement.

A man in his 40s, who is said to have been known to the victim, is currently assisting police with the investigation.

South West District Superintendent Geoff Stewart spoke to reporters on Friday, explaining significant injuries were involved.

“As I said, it was a very confronting situation, not only for police but for the people that would have come out and seen it,” he said.

“There were significant injuries involved, I won’t go into exactly the types of things that were used, but I can say items have been seized.”

– with AAP

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WA Premier Mark McGowan is refusing to open WA’s state borders to the rest of the country

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Taxi driver after fare-dodger spat at him and said he had coronavirus

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Taxi driver Trevor Belle was spat at by a man who owed him £9 and died less than a month later
Trevor Belle was spat at by a man who owed him £9 and died less than a month later

A taxi driver died with coronavirus after being spat at by a fare-dodger who claimed to have the disease, a family friend has said.

Trevor Belle, 61, died in the Royal London Hospital on April 18, having tested positive for Covid-19. Several weeks earlier, the east Londoner had been spat at by a passenger who owed him £9, according to his friend Damian Briggs.

After the incident in Stratford on March 22, Mr Belle began to feel unwell with symptoms of coronavirus, Mr Briggs explained: ‘A few days later he got rushed into hospital, he spent three weeks battling it and unfortunately didn’t make it to the end.’

The new grandfather died three days after his 61st birthday, and his friend added: ‘It’s devastating that he’s caught it doing his job.’

After his death, Mr Belle’s blood was donated to research into the effects of Covid-19 in people from BAME communities, Mr Briggs said, as he paid tribute to his ‘die-hard Arsenal supporter’ friend.

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He described them as ‘not blood brothers, but we are brothers’.

He said: ‘He loves the game, he loves Arsenal, he loves supporting to see kids do really well in the game. He did a lot of volunteering stuff.’

A GoFundMe page for Mr Belle has now raised £6,000 – double its target – to cover the costs of a funeral and ‘celebration of his life’.

Mr Briggs added: ‘Best way I can describe Trev is just a jovial person who, as serious as life is, would always find a way to get a smile on your face so you can take your mind off the problem.

‘It was very rare you saw something that bothered this guy. No matter how bad it was, he always found a way to have a laugh and chuckle.’

Get in touch with our news team by emailing us at webnews@metro.co.uk.

For more stories like this, check our news page.

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Horror as a five-year-old child is hit by a truck on busy Sydney highway 

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A five-year-old has been hit by a truck on a busy highway. 

The child was struck on Argyle Street in Picton in Sydney’s far south-west on Friday evening. 

Emergency services have been called to the scene.

More to come 

A five-year-old has been struck by a truck on a busy highway in Sydney's south-west on Friday evening (stock image)

A five-year-old has been struck by a truck on a busy highway in Sydney's south-west on Friday evening (stock image)

A five-year-old has been struck by a truck on a busy highway in Sydney’s south-west on Friday evening (stock image)

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Covid-19 is tearing vulnerable families apart – the scars will last longer than the pandemic

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Baby holding hand with woman
It’s not right that the lockdown is forcing loving family members apart (Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

None of us want to live in a society where ‘social distancing’ fractures loving families and keeps them apart.  

Yet I’m afraid that the measures being taken to slow the spread of Covid-19 will cause lifelong negative consequences for some of the most vulnerable children and their parents who are weighted down by poverty.

I work for ATD Fourth World, a human rights and anti-poverty organisation, and have seen the damage lockdown is doing to families in the UK.

In the past, a new mother considered vulnerable – and therefore potentially unable to meet the needs of her child – might have been observed with her infant in an assessment centre while social services considered the best way forward. 

Now, however, we have seen that an infant in the same family and economic situation is more likely to be immediately taken into care with no opportunities for contact visits or breastfeeding — and no date set for the mother’s parenting capacity to be assessed. 

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In families with older children, support services that had been arranged to make it possible for children to remain in their homes are sometimes being cancelled as they’re seen as ‘non-essential’ during lockdown. This, again, leads to the immediate removals of children. 

In normal circumstances, relatives who could be authorised to take care of these children would be assessed; but these inspections have also been halted. 

All of this is happening during a lockdown-induced increase in family court proceedings. It’s not right that the unique circumstances brought about by the pandemic is forcing loving family members apart. 

Prior to coronavirus, research found  that families facing financial hardship were the most likely to have their children removed into care. It’s a result of confusion between neglect, inequality and poverty. A ‘postcode lottery’, where some local authorities take far more children into care than others, was also discovered.  

None of this has changed because of Covid-19. In fact, it’s likely got worse. 

With all court proceedings suddenly taking place remotely via telephone or Skype, there is grave doubt about how fair and empathetic such hearings can be. 

Given these circumstances, some judges have chosen not to make any final decisions on forced adoptions

The technical obstacles connecting birth parents, foster carers, solicitors, barristers, social workers, judges and others remotely are formidable and sometimes insurmountable, particularly for people who cannot afford smartphones, Wi-Fi or data. 

Even when the technical side functions correctly, parents cannot be in the same room as their solicitors. Some parties must participate in the same room as their children, who can then overhear everything. 

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Parents tell me they often have no idea who else is on the call — or whether an ex-partner may be recording, or an uninvited person listening in over someone’s shoulder. Meanwhile, a parent who is not giving evidence during a telephone hearing becomes completely invisible to all the others. 

At the end of the hearing, they are completely alone without anyone who can offer them empathy or moral support if they have lost custody of their children. 

Given these circumstances, some judges have chosen not to make any final decisions on forced adoptions. 

Yet, once we are out of this crisis, I am not hoping for a return to ‘business as usual’. For a long time now, too many children in the grip of poverty have been removed from loving parents because of a lack of support from social services. 

The decisions have been made with little regard for the long-term harm of separation for children themselves, their relationships with their sisters and brothers, their extended family and their birth parents. 

The right to family life has been undermined because the child protection system fails to understand or recognise poverty, confuses societal neglect with parental neglect, and conflates indicators of neglect with indicators of poverty. 

A true reform of the child protection system will need to draw on the experience and intelligence of children and parents held back by poverty, as well as that of some professionals who are doing their utmost to challenge the status quo.

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We are now at a critical moment where we should all be able to help design the future we want.

My hope is that we can draw on the same spirit of solidarity to support the aspirations of vulnerable parents to nurture their own children.

ATD Fourth World has launched a survey as part of the Parents, Families and Allies Network and is working alongside the Nuffield Family Justice Observatory on contact visits during lockdown.

Do you have a story that you’d like to share? Get in touch by emailing jess.austin@metro.co.uk

Share your views in the comments below.

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