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Normal People author Sally Rooney ‘refused to allow her new book to be published in Hebrew’

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An award-winning Irish author has been accused of anti-Semitism after reportedly refusing to allow her new book to be published in Hebrew.

Sally Rooney, 30, was asked by Israeli publisher Modan to translate her new book -Beautiful World, Where Are You – but the author allegedly rejected the request because she supports a cultural boycott of Israel.

Miss Rooney’s new book was released in September and topped book charts in the UK and Ireland.

However it was later reported that the writer’s views on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict had seen her turn down a translation of her book from Modan.

The row has sparked a wave of criticism against the Irish author and screenwriter, whose book Normal People won a series of awards and was later adapted into a BBC TV drama. 

Some took to social media to accuse Miss Rooney’s decision as ‘anti-Semitic’, while others questioned why her books were published for an audience in China – which has been accused of human rights abuses over its treatment of Uighur Muslims. 

Sally Rooney, 30, was asked by Israeli publisher Modan to translate her new book -Beautiful World, Where Are You - but the author allegedly rejected the request

Sally Rooney, 30, was asked by Israeli publisher Modan to translate her new book -Beautiful World, Where Are You – but the author allegedly rejected the request

The New York Times published the interview with Miss Rooney in September but this was then translated into Hebrew and published with more details by the Israeli newspaper Haaretz.

Haaretz reported: ‘When Modan approached Rooney’s agent in an attempt to sign another translation deal, the agent announced that Rooney supports the cultural boycott movement on Israel and therefore does not approve translation into Hebrew.’ 

Miss Rooney’s agent, Tracy Bohan, said the author had declined the translation when approached for comment, according to Haaretz.

The two previous novels written by Miss Rooney, Conversations With Friends and Normal People, have both been published in Hebrew by Modan.

Miss Rooney’s support for a boycott of Israel has seen her sign an open letter which called for ‘an end to the support provided by global powers to Israel and its military; especially the United States’ and also urged governments to ‘cut trade, economic and cultural relations’.

The Jewish Telegraphic Agency also noted that in her second novel, Normal People, the main characters attend a protest against Israel’s role in the 2014 Gaza war.

Academic Gitit Levy-Paz highlighted the boycott revelation last night in a blog post on the website Forward.

She wrote: ‘Rooney’s decision surprised and saddened me. I am a Jewish and Israeli woman, but I am also a literary scholar who believes in the universal power of art.’

Meanwhile Ben Judah, a British author and journalist, wrote on Twitter: ‘Depressing and unpleasant that Sally Rooney won’t allow her new novel to be translated into Hebrew.’

Another critic of the decision was Ruth Franklin, author of Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life. She said: ‘Sally Rooney’s novels are available in Chinese and Russian.

‘Doesn’t she care about the Uighurs? Or Putin-defying journalists? To judge Israel by a different standard than the rest of the world is antisemitism.’

Joel M Petlin, Superintendent of the Kiryas Joel School District, in New York state, also criticised Miss Rooney’s stance, saying: ‘When Sally Rooney books are translated into Yiddish then we can stop calling her an anti-Semite. Until then, the label is well deserved.’ 

Meanwhile, Ron Kampeas, the Washington, D.C. bureau chief of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, urged Miss Rooney to distinguish between boycotting an Israeli publisher and the Hebrew language. 

He said: ‘The Internet has been around for quite some time now. If you’re Sally Rooney and you’re boycotting Israeli publishers there are ways to make a text available in Hebrew to make clear you are not boycotting a culture, a people, an ethnicity.

Asked if it was her responsibility to have the texts translated, he replied: ‘It’s not her responsibility, no. But unlike a boycott of, say, a book festival in Israel, or a university symposium, this involves keeping the book from appearing in a Jewish language. I think it behooves a writer to explain that they would not object to translation per se.’ 

Miss Rooney’s three novels are renowned for their minimalist writing style and melancholy depiction of life in post-financial crisis Ireland. Her work also addresses tensions between Ireland’s working and middle classes.

She won four book awards in the UK, including Young Writer of the Year by the Sunday Times in 2017 and the Costa Book award in 2018.

Normal People, based on the on-off relationship between Marianne Sheridan and Connell Waldron during their youth, was adapted into an acclaimed BBC series in 2020.

Following the show’s success Miss Rooney described the downfalls of fame.

Miss Rooney's Normal People was later adapted into an acclaimed BBC series in 2020

Miss Rooney’s Normal People was later adapted into an acclaimed BBC series in 2020

Beautiful World, Where Are You follows the life of novelist Alice after she asks a distribution warehouse worker to travel to Rome with her

Beautiful World, Where Are You follows the life of novelist Alice after she asks a distribution warehouse worker to travel to Rome with her

She told The Guardian: ‘Of course, that person could stop doing whatever it is they’re good at, in order to be allowed to retire from public life, but that seems to me like a big sacrifice on their part and an exercise in cultural self-destruction for the rest of us, forcing talented people either to endure hell or keep their talents to themselves.

‘I don’t think it is graceless for people in those positions to speak out about how poisonous this system is. It doesn’t seem to work in any real way for anyone, except presumably some shareholders somewhere.’  

Her latest novel Beautiful World, Where Are You follows the life of novelist Alice after she asks a distribution warehouse worker to travel to Rome with her.  

In 2018, Miss Rooney told The Daily Telegraph that she struggled with socialising while growing up, despite her newfound status as the voice of the so-called ‘millennial’ generation.

She said: ‘I thought school was immensely boring and, as a teenager, I often found social life quite mystifying…I was not someone to whom it came easily to be charming.’

A spokesman for Modan told The Daily Telegraph it would not be publishing Rooney’s third novel but declined to say whether this was due to a boycott. 



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