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Oxford University is accused of ‘moral failure’ after accepting donations from Mosley family

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Oxford University has been labelled an establishment of ‘vast hypocrisy’ by a former senior research fellow after it accepted a multi-million pound donation from the Mosley family.  

The university and two of its colleges received charitable gifts totalling more than £12 million from a charitable fund up by the recently deceased Max Mosley which drew upon the vast fortune of his father Sir Oswald – the leader of the British Union of Fascists. 

The establishment’s acceptance of the charitable donations from a family renowned for its links to fascism and anti-Semitism has drawn ire from former professors. 

Dr Lawrence Goldman, the former director of the Institute of Historical Research and senior dean of St Peter’s college, accused the university of ‘vast hypocrisy’ and ‘moral failure’ for accepting the donations.

‘The university has gone off the scale in wokery,’ he said in reference to the university’s efforts to ‘decolonise’ the curriculum.

‘But they go ahead and take money from a fund established by proven and known fascists. 

‘There has been a total moral failure.’

Oxford university and two Oxford colleges have been chastised for accepting donations totalling more than £12 million from a charitable trust set up by former world motorsport boss Max Mosely (pictured in 2011). The Mosley family are notorious for their links to fascism and anti-Semitism.

Oxford university and two Oxford colleges have been chastised for accepting donations totalling more than £12 million from a charitable trust set up by former world motorsport boss Max Mosely (pictured in 2011). The Mosley family are notorious for their links to fascism and anti-Semitism.

The establishment's acceptance of the charitable donations from a family renowned for its links to fascism has drawn ire from former professors

The establishment’s acceptance of the charitable donations from a family renowned for its links to fascism has drawn ire from former professors

Dr Lawrence Goldman (pictured in 2015), the former director of the Institute of Historical Research and senior dean of St Peter's college, accused the university of 'vast hypocrisy' and 'moral failure' for accepting the donations.

Dr Lawrence Goldman (pictured in 2015), the former director of the Institute of Historical Research and senior dean of St Peter’s college, accused the university of ‘vast hypocrisy’ and ‘moral failure’ for accepting the donations.

Goldman, who said a number of his family were killed in the Holocaust, spent months campaigning vigorously against St Peter’s college’s acceptance of their share of the donations and told the Telegraph he was shocked they eventually took the money. 

‘[St Peter’s college] is taking funds from the most infamous fascist dynasty in the English-speaking world, the Mosley family,’ he wrote.

The university took in a £6 million donation from the fund, while two Oxford colleges – St Peter’s and Lady Margaret Hall –  accepted £6.3 million between them. 

Max Mosley set up The Alexander Mosley Trust in the name of his son (pictured) who died from an drug overdose in 2009.

Max Mosley set up The Alexander Mosley Trust in the name of his son (pictured) who died from an drug overdose in 2009.

Max Mosley, who passed away from cancer earlier this year aged 81, set up The Alexander Mosley Trust in the name of his son who died from an drug overdose in 2009.

But the much of the funds funnelled into the charitable foundation came from the estate of Sir Oswald Mosley, who married wife Diana Mitford in 1936 in Berlin at the home of Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi minister for propaganda. 

Oswald’s guest of honour? None other than Herr Adolf Hitler. 

And though Max himself did not celebrate his nuptials with one of the world’s most infamous and abhorrent dictators, his support for the British Union of Fascists and its successor, the Union Movement, is well documented.  

In 1961, the former boss of world motorsport worked for a fascist candidate in a local by-election whose campaign included the slogan ‘coloured immigration threatens your children’s health’, and was also arrested for assaulting anti-fascist protesters during a march. 

Max Mosley with his mother Lady Mosley and father Sir Oswald Mosley - leader of the British Union of Fascists - pictured in London in August 1962.

Max Mosley with his mother Lady Mosley and father Sir Oswald Mosley – leader of the British Union of Fascists – pictured in London in August 1962. 

Chairman of the education select committee Robert Halfon said: 'I find it distressing that Oxford University is so keen to go on about diversity and inclusion, but is prepared to take the shilling from such sources.'

Chairman of the education select committee Robert Halfon said: ‘I find it distressing that Oxford University is so keen to go on about diversity and inclusion, but is prepared to take the shilling from such sources.’

The university however seemed happy to turn a blind eye to the Mosley family's chequered past. The £6 million donation to Oxford University will be used to set up the Alexander Mosley Professor of Biophysics Fund, while the £5 million given to St Peter's is being put towards the construction of a new block of student accommodation in the city (pictured: Oxford University/St Mary's church)

The university however seemed happy to turn a blind eye to the Mosley family’s chequered past. The £6 million donation to Oxford University will be used to set up the Alexander Mosley Professor of Biophysics Fund, while the £5 million given to St Peter’s is being put towards the construction of a new block of student accommodation in the city (pictured: Oxford University/St Mary’s church)

Lord Mann, the Government’s anti-Semitism advisor, said: ‘If Oxford is trying to rehabilitate the Mosley family name in any way, they can expect a very hostile response. 

‘I don’t imagine people would be very happy to have a Mussolini building, or a Hitler scholarship. People in this country will feel the same way in relation to the Mosley name.’

Meanwhile, Chairman of the education select committee Robert Halfon declared: ‘I find it distressing that Oxford University is so keen to go on about diversity and inclusion, but is prepared to take the shilling from such sources.’ 

The university however seemed happy to turn a blind eye to the Mosley family’s chequered past.

The £6 million donation to Oxford University will be used to set up the Alexander Mosley Professor of Biophysics Fund, while the £5 million given to St Peter’s is being put towards the construction of a new block of student accommodation in the city.  

The university and the colleges said the funds were cleared by an independent committee, taking ‘legal, ethical and reputational issues into consideration’. 

It comes just days after Oxford University’s Linacre College, named after humanist and physician Thomas Linacre (1460-1524), announced its name would be changed to ‘Thao college’ in honour of Vietnamese billionaire Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao who donated a whopping £155 million. 

Thao founded the budget airline VietJet Air and has been fined several times for perking up her flights with semi-naked stewardesses. 

Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao (pictured), known as Madam Thao, is having an Oxford college named after her after she donated a whopping £155 million

Nguyen Thi Phuong Thao (pictured), known as Madam Thao, is having an Oxford college named after her after she donated a whopping £155 million

Oxford University's Linacre College's name is to be changed to Thao College in honour of a Vietnamese billionaire who founded the budget airline VietJet Air

Oxford University’s Linacre College’s name is to be changed to Thao College in honour of a Vietnamese billionaire who founded the budget airline VietJet Air

Oxford University has been embroiled in a number of rows over free speech and ‘wokeness’ as of late.

Oxford students recently removing a portrait of the Queen from Magdalen’s Middle Common Room due to the monarchy’s links to colonialism, while Theresa May’s portrait was taken down from the geography department so as not to antagonise EU students.

Last year, 150 rebel academics threatened to boycott teaching and outreach work because Oxford’s Oriel College refused to take down a statue of Victorian imperialist Cecil Rhodes.  

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