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Pub bans people who are wearing shoes with no socks

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Pub bans people who are wearing shoes with no socks
The Dreadnought pub has put in place a rather unique clothing ban (Picture: SWNS)

A pub in Edinburgh has extended a ban which outlawed ‘jobby catcher’ tracksuits to also prohibit drinkers bearing their ‘mankles’.

The Dreadnought Pub in Leith has taken the drastic step after noticing a drop in standards among punters’ fashion sense.

It has even put signs up in the window setting out the new ban.

A hilarious post on its Facebook page reads: ‘We were accused of snobbishness last time but, frankly, they just make the place look scruffy.

‘We do our best to keep the place looking reasonably smart.

‘If the first you see when you walk in is a group of lads wearing matching grey marl jobby catchers, we may as well have installed a beaten up bus shelter in the corner and invited folk to take a slash against it.

‘Just to prove our sartorial prejudices cross all boundaries, we’re also taking a stand against this horrendous current trend of half mast jeans, bare ankles and shoes.

A sign at the entrance of the Dreadnought pub in Leith, Edinburgh (Picture: Dreadnought Leith/Facebook)
A sign at the entrance of the pub (Picture: Dreadnought Leith/Facebook)

‘It may seem trivial but there was that “jeans halfway down the arse” trend a few years ago and it went unchecked to the point that we had a lad sitting at the bar with his strides basically round his ankles, displaying a massive skidmark up the back of his threadbare shreddies.

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‘If you’re going to base your fashion choices on what the staff at Urban Outfitters were wearing, there’s a place created especially for you. It’s called Brewdog.’

The decision drew support from drinkers, with Robert Rothwell commenting: ‘A gents loafer without a sock – the mince trotter – should be a lifetime ban.’

Garry McLea added: ‘Never been in your pub but I commend you on your dress guidelines. If I’m ever in Leith I will make a point of visiting.’

And Darren Robb said: ‘Sensible policies for a happier Scotland.’

Mairi Beaver, who runs the successful fashion and lifestyle blog This Girl Can, said the pub deserved both praise and a word of warning for the owners.

She said: ‘Whilst I applaud anyone who advocates that “jobby catchers” shouldn’t be worn anywhere other than the gym, suggesting that a cheeky turn up is not welcome in the hipster-heartland of Leith is a bit risque.

‘I love the tongue-and-cheek approach – much more preferred than the bouncers of George Street’s approach.’

GV of the Dreadnought pub in Leith, Edinburgh. The Dreadnought pub in Leith, Edinburgh, has put in place a rather unique clothing ban - on ?jobby catchers (a two-piece tracksuit) ? and ?mankles (turn-up jeans twinned with a bare ankle)?. See SWNS story SWSCpub. From flared trousers to oversized t-shirts, Edinburgh?s fashion police have been out in force for decades deciding what is and what isn?t fashionable. For one pub in Edinburgh such crimes to the eyes which the Capital?s fashionistas decide to force on other people have led to a ban like no other. Forget ?no shirt, no shoes, no service?, Dreadnought in Leith have put in place a flat ban on ?jobby catchers? and ?mankles?.
Punters were similarly left in stitches by the pub’s ‘anti-theft’ glasses bearing slogans like ‘I’m voting UKIP’ (Picture: SWNS)

Last May, the pub left punters in stitches after introducing ‘anti-theft’ pint glasses with hilarious slogans emblazoned across them.

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They read ‘I’m voting UKIP’ and ‘I Stole this Glass from the Dreadnought because I’m a twat’.

Dreadnought Leith has been contacted for further comment.

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Source: Metro News

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Fast-fashion retailer broke advertising rules by selling real-fur as fake

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Real mink fur earings and real rabbit fur pyjamas sold as fake by online retailer Romwe, which has been penalised by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) in the UK
Romwe could face further sanctions after failing to reply to UK advertising authorities (Picture: Humane Society International)

Shoppers have been warned not to always trust the label after an online fashion retailer was caught passing off animal trims as fake.

The UK Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has penalised Romwe after charity Humane Society International (HSI) bought clothes from the fashion website and had them tested at an independent lab.

A pyjama set advertised as having ‘faux fur detail’ actually contained rabbit hair, while ‘black artificial mink fur ball earrings’ turned out to be made with the real thing.

Campaigners say this sort of false advertising is an ongoing problem in the UK, prompting calls for businesses to get their act together when dealing with suppliers.

(Picture: Humane Society International) Fashion retailer Romwe gets a rap from ASA for selling real fur as faux Advertising Standards Authority upholds Humane Society International?s challenge that the retailer breached code with ?misleading? advertising London (4th February 2020) ? The Advertising Standards Authority has penalised fast-fashion online retailer Romwe for selling real animal fur as faux fur, following a complaint by animal charity Humane Society International/UK. HSI UK, which leads the #FurFreeBritain campaign, found two items for sale online marketed as faux fur which subsequent testing by an independent textile analysis laboratory confirmed to be real animal fur. HSI UK purchased a ?Flamingo & Slogan Print Faux Fur Detail Top & Striped Pants PJ Set? with a ?faux fur detail? that lab tests revealed to contain rabbit fur, and ?Black Artificial Mink Fur Ball Earrings? that lab tests confirmed were made of mink fur.
These ‘artificial mink fur’ earrings were actually made using the animal’s hair (Picture: Humane Society International)

Humane Society UK campaigner Shelly Bryan told Metro.co.uk: ‘It’s very important that retailers should absolutely know what they are buying and are absolutely clear what they do and don’t sell.

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‘I think the retailers need to be a lot more aware and a lot more questioning and a lot more careful.’

She said the issue keeps coming up both online and in store and urged shoppers to keep their eyes peeled and to raise issues with shops and websites if they have any suspicions.

It comes after TK Maxx was found to be selling real fur in multiple stores across Britain, despite introducing a ban on animal trims in 2003.

The ASA first contacted Romwe in January 2019 and issued an Enforcement Notice over the ‘misleading’ claims about ‘faux fur’ in clothes and accessories.

But having learned they were continuing to sell real animal trims, the regulatory body contacted them again last month.

After giving no response, Romwe has now been listed as a non-compliant advertiser and may face further sanctions.’

A rabbit fur farm in China documented by the Humane Society
Rabbits in this fur farm in China spend their lives in small an unsanitary cages (Picture: Humane Society International)
(Picture: Humane Society International) Fashion retailer Romwe gets a rap from ASA for selling real fur as faux Advertising Standards Authority upholds Humane Society International?s challenge that the retailer breached code with ?misleading? advertising London (4th February 2020) ? The Advertising Standards Authority has penalised fast-fashion online retailer Romwe for selling real animal fur as faux fur, following a complaint by animal charity Humane Society International/UK. HSI UK, which leads the #FurFreeBritain campaign, found two items for sale online marketed as faux fur which subsequent testing by an independent textile analysis laboratory confirmed to be real animal fur. HSI UK purchased a ?Flamingo & Slogan Print Faux Fur Detail Top & Striped Pants PJ Set? with a ?faux fur detail? that lab tests revealed to contain rabbit fur, and ?Black Artificial Mink Fur Ball Earrings? that lab tests confirmed were made of mink fur.
Independent lab tests found rabbit fur in this pyjama set (Picture: Humane Society International)

Shelly said misconceptions which could easily mislead shoppers include the idea that fur is always expensive or exclusive, when in fact it can be surprisingly cheap.

She added: ‘I think that’s quite a shock for people. Their fur really is that cheap, it’s a really cheap life on a fur farm.’

More than 100 million animals across the globe are reportedly killed for their fur, after living short and miserable lives in small and barren wire cages for their entire lives.

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HSI International say mink are often killed by gassing while foxes and raccoon dogs are killed by anal electrocution.

A fur farm in Finland documented by the Humane Society
HSI investigators in Finland found mutilated minks who even resorted to cannibalism (Picture: Humane Society International)
A rabbit fur farm in China documented by the Humane Society
HSI are calling for a total ban of fur in Britain (Picture: Caption: Humane Society International)

While there are many horror stories in countries with no animal welfare laws like China, there are plenty in the European Union, where some 46 million animals are killed for their fur every year.

In 2018 HSI investigators at ‘high welfare’ facilities in Finland found diseased and wounded mink kept in tiny and cramped cages.

Their conditions turned many of them stir-crazy and led to self-mutilation, fighting and in some cases even cannibalism.

More creatures are caught in traps and killed for their fur in the wild – mainly in the US, Canada and Russia, where they are often left for days dying slowly in agonising pain.

Shelly said polling carried out by HSI UK suggests most British shoppers want to avoid real animal trims, but without knowing how to look out for the warning signs, many will pick them up from the shelves without realising.

She added: ‘They’re buying something that actually, in their heart-of-hearts, are going out to avoid, I think it’s very shocking.’

How to spot real fur

  • Hair have pointed ends
  • Parting at the base of the animal skin – like the hair on your head
  • Real fur burns like real hair while faux-fur melts and smells like plastic

Humane Society UK Executive Director Claire Bass said: ‘It’s completely unacceptable that compassionate consumers setting out to buy fake fur are being misled into buying cruel animal fur.

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‘The vast majority of British shoppers want nothing to do with the horrors of fur farming and trapping, but because of mislabelling shoppers face a minefield trying to avoid it.

‘As long as animal fur can be legally and cheaply sold here this problem of ‘fake fake fur’ will persist.

‘The UK banned fur farming almost two decades ago because it was deemed too cruel, now we must finish the job and ban animal fur sales too.’

In 2018 Parliament’s Environmental Food and Rural Affairs (EFRA) Committee scrutinised the issue of real fur being sold as faux.

One of the the Committee’s recommendations released last summer was for the government to hold a public consultation to consider whether to ban the import and sale of animal fur in the UK, post-Brexit.

HSI is currently pushing for animal trims to be taken off the shelves altogether with its #FurFreeBritain campaign.

They say the ban would end a ‘double standard’ which sees imports cruelly produced in other countries being sold in the UK, where fur farming is banned on ethical grounds.

Romwe have been contacted for comment.

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Source: Metro News

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TK Maxx sells rabbit fur despite its own policy banning it

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Rabbit farm in China (left) and rabbit fur bags found in TK Maxx branches in the UK
Activists are demanding to know why real fur keeps hitting TK Maxx shops (Picture: Humane Society/Evolve Activism)

Coats, hats and handbags containing real animal trims are slipping through the net and making it onto shelves at TK Maxx.

Animal rights campaigners are asking why this keeps happening in branches across the country – despite the brand operating a no-fur policy.

It is thought stores have been unknowingly buying rabbit, fox and raccoon dog fur from other suppliers before selling them on to unwitting customers.

Campaign group Evolve Activism say the retailer’s public stance on fur will make shoppers lower their guards, assuming they couldn’t be buying the real thing.

TK Maxx selling raccoon and fox fur in shops across the UK picture: Evolve Activism METROGRAB
Shoppers say managers are quick to take animal trims off the shelves when they are pointed out (Picture: Evolve Activism)
TK Maxx selling raccoon and fox fur in shops across the UK
Pictures from a Finnish fur farm show the horrific conditions animals are kept in (Picture: Humane Society)

Its founder Emma Jade Easton told Metro.co.uk: ‘It’s not just a one off, it’s happening across the country.

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The activist says she’s spoken to a number of shoppers, all of whom alerted store managers and were told the coats, bags, hats and shoes in question would be taken off the shelves.

But Emma, 46, says it keeps on happening and that the problem is ‘not being addressed’.

She said customers need to be ‘confident’ they are actually buying faux fur trims – especially given the store’s policy, introduced in 2003.

A fur farm in China documented by the Humane Society
Roughly 14 million raccoon dogs are killed in Chinese fur farms every year (Picture: Humane Society)
TK Maxx selling raccoon and fox fur in shops across the UK picture: Evolve Activism METROGRAB
TK Maxx customers have flagged a number of items with staff (Picture: Evolve Activism)
TK Maxx selling raccoon and fox fur in shops across the UK
Footage seen by Metro.co.uk shows rabbits still squirming as they are hung upside down and sliced in the neck (Picture: Humane Society)

Evolve Activism’s latest findings come despite TK Maxx being exposed in a 2018 BBC Watchdog investigation.

Items spotted include Dolce and Gabbana leather handbag with rabbit fur pom-poms, found late last year in a branch in Hammersmith, west London.

A Colmar jacket which campaigners say was made using silver fox was spotted at a store in Epsom, Surrey.

Children’s shoes and a pink Grafea bag, both thought to contain rabbit fur, were found in Stratford and Cambridge, respectively.

A number of other cases have been reported online from shoppers cross the country.

TK Maxx selling raccoon and fox fur in shops across the UK
In the European Union around 42.6 million mink are killed for their fur (Picture: Humane Society)
TK Maxx selling raccoon and fox fur in shops across the UK picture: Evolve Activism METROGRAB
Activists say TK Maxx’s no-fur policy could put shoppers into a false sense of security (Picture: Evolve Activism)

After alerting staff to the dyed-red rabbit fur D&G bag, Emma said staff assured her it was not company policy to sell fur.

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She added: ‘That has been the common theme with everybody that I’ve spoken to. They say they will remove it from the shelves and tell head office but why is it still happening?

‘The customers have to know what they’re buying. I want to know what they’re going to do about it.’

Emma, who has been campaigning against animal fur since January 2017, is planning a protest against Dolce and Gabbana in London next month.

TK Maxx selling raccoon and fox fur in shops across the UK
Animals are kept in brutal and cramped conditions and are often found with injuries and deformities (Picture: Humane Society)

The single mum added: ‘If you get the designers and the fashion houses to drop fur that will filter down to the high street.’

According to the Humane Society International (HSI) 100 million animals including mink, foxes, rabbit, chinchilla and raccoon dogs are killed every year on intensive fur-farms.

Often before they are one year old, when their pelts are at their ‘best’, they are gassed, electrocuted and bludgeoned to death for the sake of fashion.

They are killed after spending their entire lives in wire cages despite a natural instinct to dig, roam over large areas and swim.

A fur farm in Finland documented by the Humane Society
Cramped conditions mean animals often fight each other and self mutilate (Picture: Humane Society)
A rabbit fur farm in China documented by the Humane Society
Rabbits are killed while they are still young and their fur is at its prime (Picture: Humane Society)

Footage from a Chinese rabbit fur farm, which Metro.co.uk has decided is too distressing to publish, shows workers taking rabbits from cramped cages, hanging them on hooks and slitting their throats as they squirm in terror.

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While there are plenty of horror stories from countries with no animal rights laws such as China, the Humane Society is keen to point out examples in the European Union, where some 46 million animals are killed on fur farms every year.

A 2018 investigation into ‘high welfare’ Finnish facilities showed examples of foxes with deformed feet and diseased eyes, mink with open and infected wounds.

The HSI say the mental distress caused by harsh conditions and confined spaces have led to self-mutilation, fighting with cage mates and even cannibalism.

More creatures are caught in traps and killed for their fur in the wild – mainly in the US, Canada and Russia, where they are often left for days dying slowly in agonising pain.

TK Maxx selling raccoon and fox fur in shops across the UK picture: Evolve Activism METROGRAB
Product details of this D&G bag online say it contains real rabbit fur (Picture: Evolve Activism)

Humane Society International’s UK executive director, Claire Bass, said: ‘The vast majority of British shoppers want nothing to do with the cruel and outdated fur trade, so it’s massively disappointing when big-name brands expose shoppers to the risk of buying real fur mislabelled as fake fur.

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‘Fur from animals who have suffered miserable lives trapped in battery cages, and excruciating deaths through electrocution or gassing, is masquerading as fake fur on our high streets, creating a minefield for would-be ethical shoppers.

‘As long as animal fur can be legally sold here this problem of “fake fake fur” will persist, which is one of the reasons we’re calling on the UK government to ban the sale of animal fur, protecting consumers, and animals, from the cruelty and deception of the fur trade.’

A TKMaxx spokeswoman told Metro.co.uk: ‘At TK Maxx, operating with integrity is at the heart of our business.

‘TK Maxx has a longstanding no fur policy, and both our buyers and vendors understand that we do not knowingly purchase items containing fur.

‘A typical TK Maxx store and our online shop receive several deliveries a week with each delivery containing thousands of items.

‘Despite our robust processes, an error can occasionally occur. If an item containing real fur is found in our stores, we immediately remove the item from sale.

‘We apologise to our customers for any inconvenience and plan to reiterate our fur policies with our teams.

Dolce and Gabbana has been contacted for comment.

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Source: Metro News

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Oxfam branded ‘greedy’ over Burberry coat on sale at charity shop for £500

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Pictures of Burberry coat for sale at Oxfam charity shop in Princetown, Devon for £499
Locals slammed the price as ‘ridiculous’ and ‘over the top’ (Picture: SWNS)

Shoppers were left baffled by a coat with a ‘ridiculous’ and ‘over the top’ price tag at an Oxfam charity shop.

Ginny Rich, 46, thought she’d found herself a bargain when she found a Burberry jacket at the store in Princetown, Devon.

But then she saw it was priced at £499, and although it was labelled as ‘brand new’, the tags were missing.

Posting her find on social media, she said: ‘I know Burberry coats can cost £1,000 new but when we saw it we were laughing.

‘The coat didn’t even look new – and it didn’t have any labels.’

Among other items on sale in Tavistock Oxfam shop at the time of writing was a ladies? blazer by the same designer, priced at ?499 by the shop. See SWNS story SWPLoxfam - Shoppers bemused at eye-watering ?329 price tag of coat being sold at Oxfam charity shop.
It was listed as brand new, but its tags had been removed (Picture: SWNS)
Ginny Rich (pictured) posted a snap of a Burberry peacoat marked as ?brand new? and on sale at Tavistock?s Oxfam shop, priced at ?329 by the goodwill store. See SWNS story SWPLoxfam - Shoppers bemused at eye-watering ?329 price tag of coat being sold at Oxfam charity shop.
Ginny Rich said charity shops are for ‘people who can’t afford to buy a new coat’ (Picture: SWNS)

‘Charity shops are for the kind of people who can’t afford to buy a new coat – and if you were a millionaire who can afford a designer label, you wouldn’t go into a charity shop – you’d want the most up-to-date fashion.

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‘I just don’t think the prices in Oxfam add up; this is Tavistock, not London or Oxford.’

‘You go in some days and can find something for £2.99 but on other days you might see something that cost less new at Primark.

‘There just doesn’t seem to be a balance with Oxfam.’

Chipping in on the post, locals commented that the prices were ‘over the top’ and ‘ridiculous’ and said such a high price tag could backfire on the charity.

One said: ‘Oxfam are getting greedy. Maybe if they want those prices they need to sell on an auction site.

‘Clothing donation[s] whether designer label or not, will not get £329 in Tavy.’

Defending the price tag, a retail assistant from a nearby Oxfam shop said: ‘We very kindly get sent clothing from brands like this and price them at a third of their retail value, a bargain for those who would like brand new designer stuff and an amazing contribution to help people.’

Ginny Rich posted a snap of a Burberry peacoat (pictured) marked as ?brand new? and on sale at Tavistock?s Oxfam shop, priced at ?329 by the goodwill store. See SWNS story SWPLoxfam - Shoppers bemused at eye-watering ?329 price tag of coat being sold at Oxfam charity shop.
But others defended the price and said it’s ‘such a bargain’ compared to its retail value (Picture: SWNS)

Another volunteer for the charity said: ‘It is a cashmere jacket. Check online and see what its retail price is. It is such a bargain.’

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Other items in the shop included another Burberry jacket on sale for £329, which was also labelled as brand new.

A spokesperson for Oxfam said: ‘We maximise the money we raise from donations by selling them at a fair price.

‘Our volunteers are trained in pricing so people can be assured not a penny of their donation goes to waste.

‘We work hard to raise as much money as possible from the items given to us to support our work fighting poverty around the world.’

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Source: Metro News

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