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ROBERT HARDMAN on the solemn dignity of Remembrance Sunday 

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She was a princess when she laid her first wreath at the Cenotaph. 

As a veteran herself – and, indeed, the only head of state in the world today who served in the Second World War – the Queen knows this ceremony better than anyone.

Yet, for her, it remains as poignant as ever. Hence, the tear gently making its way down the royal cheek yesterday as she led the nation in tribute to all those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

Her Majesty is pictured above shedding a tear. As a veteran herself ¿ and, indeed, the only head of state in the world today who served in the Second World War ¿ the Queen knows this ceremony better than anyone

Her Majesty is pictured above shedding a tear. As a veteran herself ¿ and, indeed, the only head of state in the world today who served in the Second World War ¿ the Queen knows this ceremony better than anyone

Her Majesty is pictured above shedding a tear. As a veteran herself – and, indeed, the only head of state in the world today who served in the Second World War – the Queen knows this ceremony better than anyone

Flanked by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, the Queen looked on from a balcony as the Prince of Wales placed her wreath on the Cenotaph before laying his own tribute. 

Stretching into the distance, veterans and families from every strand of the Armed Forces lined up to do the same.

This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the Cenotaph itself but of the two-minute silence at 11am. Both were introduced by George V in 1919, a mere seven years before the Queen’s birth.

Flanked by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, the Queen looked on from a balcony as the Prince of Wales placed her wreath on the Cenotaph before laying his own tribute. The Duchess of Cambridge is pictured above

Flanked by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, the Queen looked on from a balcony as the Prince of Wales placed her wreath on the Cenotaph before laying his own tribute. The Duchess of Cambridge is pictured above

Flanked by the Duchesses of Cornwall and Cambridge, the Queen looked on from a balcony as the Prince of Wales placed her wreath on the Cenotaph before laying his own tribute. The Duchess of Cambridge is pictured above

Very little has changed since. Not once did the Queen – wearing her traditional five-stemmed poppy – even glance at the order of service for this ceremony, knowing every word of every hymn and prayer.

Her only other words, according to lip-reading spectators, concerned the weather. 

‘Isn’t it freezing?’ the Duchess of Cornwall observed just before the start. ‘Quite bracing,’ added the Duchess of Cambridge. ‘It’s cold enough,’ the Queen concurred.

On the adjacent balcony, the Duchess of Sussex joined the Countess of Wessex and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence. 

Down below, all the Queen’s children, along with her grandsons, the Dukes of Cambridge and Sussex, and her cousin, the Duke of Kent, stood smartly to attention in their uniforms. The wreath of the Duke of Edinburgh, now aged 98 and retired from public life, was laid by his equerry.

Less well-trained, however, were the political contingent. The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, set off to lay his wreath too early, ran into an ear-splitting military command to ‘Stand At – Ease!’ and hastily shuffled back to his position before having a second go.

Four balconies along from the monarch’s position, Mr Johnson’s girlfriend, Carrie Symonds, appeared in a respectful blue coat and hat, standing alongside Lord Bilimoria, patron of the UK Zoroastrian Parsi community, and other faith representatives.

Twice during the half-hour service, however, she disappeared inside for several minutes. Downing Street declined to comment.

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, set off to lay his wreath too early, ran into an ear-splitting military command to ¿Stand At ¿ Ease!¿ and hastily shuffled back to his position before having a second go

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, set off to lay his wreath too early, ran into an ear-splitting military command to ¿Stand At ¿ Ease!¿ and hastily shuffled back to his position before having a second go

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, set off to lay his wreath too early, ran into an ear-splitting military command to ‘Stand At – Ease!’ and hastily shuffled back to his position before having a second go

The Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, had certainly made a greater effort with his appearance than on previous occasions. Last year’s much-criticised red tie and anorak had been replaced by a dark blue tie and smart overcoat (which, unlike the Prime Minister’s, was also done up). 

Mr Corbyn’s lips were certainly moving during both the Lord’s Prayer and the national anthem. 

¿Isn¿t it freezing?¿ the Duchess of Cornwall observed just before the start. ¿Quite bracing,¿ added the Duchess of Cambridge. ¿It¿s cold enough,¿ the Queen concurred. On the adjacent balcony, the Duchess of Sussex (above) joined the Countess of Wessex and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

¿Isn¿t it freezing?¿ the Duchess of Cornwall observed just before the start. ¿Quite bracing,¿ added the Duchess of Cambridge. ¿It¿s cold enough,¿ the Queen concurred. On the adjacent balcony, the Duchess of Sussex (above) joined the Countess of Wessex and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

‘Isn’t it freezing?’ the Duchess of Cornwall observed just before the start. ‘Quite bracing,’ added the Duchess of Cambridge. ‘It’s cold enough,’ the Queen concurred. On the adjacent balcony, the Duchess of Sussex (above) joined the Countess of Wessex and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

Come the wreath-laying, however, his neck remained as stiff as ever, prompting the usual did he?/didn’t he? online debate about whether his micro-inflexion of the head qualified as a bow or not.

Given that this has become an annual issue and that he is in the middle of an election campaign, it would surely have done no harm to give an unequivocal nod to the ‘Glorious Dead’. Yet he did not.

The Labour leader had already attracted criticism for his no-show at Saturday night’s Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall. 

While the Prime Minister sat alongside members of the Royal Family, the Labour Party was represented by the shadow foreign secretary, Emily Thornberry. 

Mr Corbyn’s officials later said that he had been waylaid meeting flood victims in Yorkshire.

For this centenary service, there had been a number of changes to the usual running order, correcting a few historic oversights. 

All the UK’s dependent territories, including Bermuda, the Falkland Islands and the Cayman Islands, had been invited to send a representative to lay a wreath ahead of the rest of the Commonwealth.

Previously, their role would be recognised collectively in a single wreath laid on their behalf by the Foreign Secretary. Here for the first time, too, was the Nepalese ambassador. 

Nepal, famously, was never subsumed into the British Empire and thus has never joined the Commonwealth.

For more than two centuries, however, the British Army has been grateful for the heroism of Nepalese Gurkhas in almost every major conflict. 

Henceforth, the Nepalese ambassador will take part in this event every year, as the Irish ambassador has done since 2014. The formalities over, the great Royal British Legion parade set off along Whitehall.

In pride of place this year, were a dozen or so Normandy veterans in recognition of the 75th anniversary of D-Day. 

This morning, all are welcome there for the traditional November 11 ceremony marking the actual anniversary of Armistice. Back in 1919, some doubted whether the bold idea of a two-minute silence would ever work

This morning, all are welcome there for the traditional November 11 ceremony marking the actual anniversary of Armistice. Back in 1919, some doubted whether the bold idea of a two-minute silence would ever work

This morning, all are welcome there for the traditional November 11 ceremony marking the actual anniversary of Armistice. Back in 1919, some doubted whether the bold idea of a two-minute silence would ever work

There, at the very front, I spotted Frank Baugh, 95, the former Royal Navy signalman who delivered that superb off-the-cuff speech at this summer’s memorial service in front of millions of television viewers at the Commonwealth cemetery in Bayeux.

After describing the carnage he encountered during more than 100 trips on to the beaches in his battered landing craft, he had concluded simply: ‘Thank you for listening to me.’ There was barely a dry eye in Bayeux.

Alongside him yesterday was former Royal Army Service Corps driver, Allan Gullis, 95. He had been a plum target as he drove trucks full of petrol and ammunition across Normandy in 1944 but had somehow dodged the German artillery. At one point, he had given a few gallons of fuel to a French farmer desperate for help with his harvest. 

The farmer thanked him with two bottles of what turned out to be Calvados and he has carried a hip flask of the stuff ever since. ‘That’s why they call me Calvados Al,’ he chuckled, offering me a sip.

On they came, the Monte Cassino veterans, the Falklands veterans, the Sea Harrier Association, the Northern Ireland Army Dog Unit (with their ceremonial dog leads round their neck), the Royal Air Force Police Association in their white berets… 

‘They’re known as “the Snowdrops” – not the snowflakes,’ chipped in David Dimbleby, deftly steering BBC1’s superb coverage through both lighter moments and the heartbreaking testimonies of those for whom this day is always a trial.

Waiting around the corner, as they do every year, were hundreds of London cabbies preparing to ferry veterans across the capital free-of-charge.

Some familiar faces, however, were missing. Since places on this parade are always over-subscribed, the Royal British Legion decided to prune its lists to ensure that veterans take priority over civilians.

This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the Cenotaph itself but of the two-minute silence at 11am. Both were introduced by George V in 1919, a mere seven years before the Queen¿s birth. Her Majesty is pictured with the Duchess of Cambridge

This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the Cenotaph itself but of the two-minute silence at 11am. Both were introduced by George V in 1919, a mere seven years before the Queen¿s birth. Her Majesty is pictured with the Duchess of Cambridge

This year marks the 100th anniversary not only of the Cenotaph itself but of the two-minute silence at 11am. Both were introduced by George V in 1919, a mere seven years before the Queen’s birth. Her Majesty is pictured with the Duchess of Cambridge

By the legion’s own admission, it has not been easy. As a result, organisations like the Girl Guides, the Women’s Institute, the Boys Brigade and the Shot at Dawn Association (honouring those shot for disobeying orders) were not in the line-up this year.

Nor was Equity, the acting union. This seemed a pity in the centenary year of the Royal Variety Performance. 

We may associate it with pop stars and tame mother-in-law jokes – next week’s event features Sir Rod Stewart and Robbie Williams in front of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge – but George V ordained that the first ‘Royal Variety’ should ‘show his appreciation of the generous manner in which artistes of the variety stage had helped with the war.’

Featuring everything from clowns to Sir Edward Elgar, it was such a success that it has been an annual fixture for the Royal Variety Charity ever since.

Another legacy of that year was Edwin Lutyens’s plan for a centrepiece to the 1919 Victory Parade. 

There, at the very front, I spotted Frank Baugh, 95, the former Royal Navy signalman who delivered that superb off-the-cuff speech at this summer¿s memorial service in front of millions of television viewers at the Commonwealth cemetery in Bayeux. He is pictured in Normandy

There, at the very front, I spotted Frank Baugh, 95, the former Royal Navy signalman who delivered that superb off-the-cuff speech at this summer¿s memorial service in front of millions of television viewers at the Commonwealth cemetery in Bayeux. He is pictured in Normandy

There, at the very front, I spotted Frank Baugh, 95, the former Royal Navy signalman who delivered that superb off-the-cuff speech at this summer’s memorial service in front of millions of television viewers at the Commonwealth cemetery in Bayeux. He is pictured in Normandy

He designed an empty coffin on top of a pillar and called it a ‘cenotaph’ (empty tomb in ancient Greek). The original was just a temporary structure of wood and plaster.

Then something remarkable happened. Grieving families chose to project their grief on to this empty tomb, imagining that it might contain the spirit of their own fallen loved one.

In no time, it was piled high with flowers as public demands grew for it to become permanent. Come November 11, the crowds were colossal. 

The Government duly commissioned Lutyens to rebuild his ‘empty tomb’ for eternity in Portland stone. To this day, it carries no religious markings and no reference to victory.

This morning, all are welcome there for the traditional November 11 ceremony marking the actual anniversary of Armistice. Back in 1919, some doubted whether the bold idea of a two-minute silence would ever work.

However, as the Mail’s correspondent noted afterwards: ‘Yesterday’s simple rite had the grandeur and majesty of sheer sincerity in tragic expression. It was, in one word, worthy.’ And so it remains.

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Real raccoon fur from Asia passed off as fake at Melbourne markets

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Stalls in two Melbourne markets have been exposed for selling products made from real animal fur, raising the prospect the disturbing practice may be far more widespread.

Forensic tests have identified fur from raccoons and raccoon dogs being passed off as fake on clothing and toys imported from China.

The inhumane practices associated with farming and slaughtering raccoon dogs – a native of east Asia closer to the fox rather than canine family – have been exposed by multiple animal rights groups in recent years.

Watch the video of a 2014 investigation into the raccoon dog fur industry in China here:

An investigation has begun into raccoon dog fur in China.
The raccoon dog is native to many parts of Asia.

Upper House member for the Animal Justice Party in the Victorian Parliament, Andy Meddick, who ran the investigation in partnership with Four Paws in Australia, said only two markets – Queen Victoria and South Melbourne market – were inspected.

Yet mislabeled items were identified at both locations.

“So we don’t know how big this could be,” he told 7NEWS.com.au

“There could be smaller strip shops and even large retailers across the state importing these items in good faith, because they basically don’t have any way of knowing.”

This jacket was labeled polyester but the trim is either raccoon or raccoon dog.

Items seized included beanies and coats with fur trim labeled acrylic or polyester but testing positive as raccoon or raccoon dog.

A child’s toy with no labeling was found to be made of rabbit.

Meddick said he would call on the Victorian Parliament next Wednesday to form a taskforce to investigate the issue in depth, and in the meantime issue a moratorium on the sale of all new fur.

This beanie was labeled acrylic but the pompom is either raccoon or raccoon dog.

“You don’t have to be a vegan, vegetarian or animal rights activist to find it abhorrent that you might be wearing real fur without knowing it,” he said.

“The entire international fur industry has dramatically declined because essentially people do not want to be associated with industries that are inherently cruel.”

More on 7NEWS.com.au

Earlier this month, Buckingham Palace announced Queen Elizabeth II will buy only faux pieces for her personal wardrobe, while several fashion houses including Gucci and Prada have committed to going fur-free.

In October, iconic US department stores Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s announced they would cease selling real fur and would close their Fur Vaults and salons.

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Australian experts reveal sunscreen mistakes you didn’t know you were making

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As temperatures soar and the holiday season gets underway, protecting your skin from the harsh Australian sun is crucial for preventing long-lasting damage. 

And while the daily use of sunscreen is a given, it isn’t enough to simply slap on cream and head out for a day on the beach.

Dermatologists have revealed some of the common mistakes people make with sunscreen – from assuming tanned skin will protect you from damage and assuming ‘all suncreens are effective’.

One of the more common mistakes people make is thinking a tan offers protection from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays

One of the more common mistakes people make is thinking a tan offers protection from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays

One of the more common mistakes people make is thinking a tan offers protection from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays 

What is the difference between UVA and UVB rays? 

* Exposure from UV (ultraviolet) rays, the sun’s natural radiation, can create damage ranging from ageing to skin cancer.

* Ultraviolet B (UVB) rays are the ones that give you sunburn.

* Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays are just as damaging because they cause skin ageing. 

1. Thinking all sunscreens are effective

According to Melbourne-based dermatologist Dr Katherine Armour, one of the biggest mistakes people make is presuming all sunscreens offer the same protection.  

‘Only sunscreens labelled broad-spectrum protect against both types of rays – UVA and UVB,’ Dr Armour previously told Daily Mail Australia.

She added that UVB rays are the ones that give you sunburn, UVA rays are just as damaging because they cause skin ageing.

‘Both can increase your risk for skin cancer,’ she added.

2.  You only apply sunscreen when you hit the beach

While you might leave it until you get out in the sun to put your sun cream on, Dr Armour said that this wasn’t effective as sunscreen ‘needs time to do its job’.

‘If you only apply it once you arrive at the beach, your skin has already been exposed to harsh UV rays and the damage has been done,’ she told FEMAIL.

‘More practically, it won’t absorb properly into the skin and will tend to melt off.’

To make sure that sunscreen has time to be absorbed into your skin, Dr Armour said you should apply it at home, or at least 20 minutes before you head outdoors. 

What are the facts on sun protection? 

* Overexposure to UV radiation causes wrinkles, skin and eye damage

* Overexposure ultimately leads to skin cancer

* UV levels can still be high, even if it’s a cloudy or rainy day

* More than 750,000 basal and squamous cell carcinomas are treated and 11,405 new melanomas are diagnosed in Australia each year

Source: Cancer Council Australia 

 

Dermatologist Dr Katherine Armour (pictured) said an SPF moisturiser isn't as effective as using sunscreen

Dermatologist Dr Katherine Armour (pictured) said an SPF moisturiser isn't as effective as using sunscreen

Dermatologist Dr Katherine Armour (pictured) said an SPF moisturiser isn’t as effective as using sunscreen

3. Thinking an SPF moisturiser is as effective as sunscreen

Given the Australian sun is harsher here than many places in the world, it isn’t enough to think an SPF moisturiser will protect the delicate skin on your face.

‘These products are cosmetics and are unlikely to be applied in such a way as to provide the protection required,’ Dr Armour said.

She said she considers them as ‘a useful adjunct’ to proper sunscreen, and they should be layered as such. 

How much sunscreen we should be using on different body parts? 

Legs: Your legs need the most amount of coverage – with two teaspoons of sunscreen – one for each. Make sure you get the tops of your legs too – especially if they’re being exposed to the sun.

Arms: The arms need just one teaspoon of sunscreen – make sure to cover the backs of your arms and any creases in your arms. Reapply when you start to sweat.

Face and neck: Half a teaspoon is needed for both your face and neck – make sure you get the whole face and don’t miss the tip of your nose or even your eye lids.

Back torso: When it comes to the back and shoulders most of us struggle to even to get to them, but if you have your back in the sun – then you should make sure there is at least one teaspoon of sunscreen on it.

Front torso: Even if you’re not sunbathing, your chest could be out in the sun when just walking around – so make sure your chest and tummy is lathered with one teaspoon of sunscreen. 

What is the difference between SPF and UPF? 

SPF measurements are done on human subjects. SPF, is a gauge of how much time a person can be exposed to the sun before getting burned.

UPF measurements of fabrics are generally tested by spectrophotometer equipment and are not tested using human subjects. The UPF rate indicates how much of the sun’s UV radiation is absorbed by the fabric. For example, a fabric with a UPF rating of 50 only allows 1/50th of the sun’s UV radiation to pass through it.

Source: Sun Grubbies 

4. Wearing clothing without UPF 

If you plan on spending days by the beach, you may need to consider investing in clothing which offers some degree of ultraviolet protection.

According to a report by Body + Soul, wearing protective clothing with a high Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF) is one of the best ways to completely protect skin from UV rays. 

The fabric needs to be dark and tightly woven. If spending a lot of time in the water, a rashie or long-sleeved swimsuit offers the most protection.

Additionally, make sure your beach kit includes a long-sleeve jacket or wrap made from more durable fabric.

One of the best things you can do to protect your skin if you are planning on spending days by the water is to invest in clothing that offers ultraviolet protection

One of the best things you can do to protect your skin if you are planning on spending days by the water is to invest in clothing that offers ultraviolet protection

One of the best things you can do to protect your skin if you are planning on spending days by the water is to invest in clothing that offers ultraviolet protection

5. Believing a tan protects you

One of the more worrisome mistakes people make is believing that as their skin tans, they are protected from the sun.

But this isn’t the case, because all types of skin are affected by UV radiation, and continually exposing your skin to the sun’s rays can increase the risk of skin cancer.

‘A tan is a sign of skin cells in trauma, so stick to the fake stuff instead,’ the publication states.

6. A higher SPF doesn’t mean more time in the sun

Heather Walker, chair of Cancer Council Australia’s Skin Cancer Committee said the problem with sunscreen is it ‘provides a false sense of security’.

She said while using sunscreen is always recommended, it is not ‘a suit of armour’, meaning you can’t apply it once and forget about it.

Ms Walker adds even if you wear an SPF 100+ product, you still shouldn’t lay in the sun for hours on end, especially without reapplying. 

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Fuel goes on sale for just 99 cents as drivers wait for more than an hour to fill up

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Motorists have been flocking to petrol stations in huge numbers after fuel prices dropped to 99 cents a litre.

Some drivers waited for more than an hour to fill up at Adelaide‘s X Convenience Valley View on Friday morning. 

They had to get in quick as the ‘flash sale’ on fuel was only happening until 2pm.

Australian petrol prices have risen over the last week as the current fuel cycle heads towards its peak with Sydney already recording a high of $1.75 a litre by Tuesday morning (stock image)

Australian petrol prices have risen over the last week as the current fuel cycle heads towards its peak with Sydney already recording a high of $1.75 a litre by Tuesday morning (stock image)

Motorists have been flocking to petrol stations in mass numbers after fuel prices dropped to 99 cents a litre (stock image) 

Shortly after the fuel went on sale, rival Caltex on Sudholz Rd dropped its price to 99.9c a litre. 

UberEats driver Bramod Saneviratne was prepared to wait the entire day if he had to as the fuel was significantly cheaper than else where in the city.

‘I would wait longer ’cause it’s around $1.74 (a litre elsewhere),’ he told Adelaide Now

Annie Elizabeth said she waited for more than an hour because fuel prices were so high. 

X Convenience Adelaide marketing head, Simon Flocco said motorists were saving between $20 and $40. 

He said they decided to do the ‘flash sale’ for 10 hours as traffic wasn’t very congested.

To grab the cheaper fuel, motorists had to follow the X Convenience Facebook page, share their post and their ‘Fuel Man’ character had to be on site. 

HOW TO SAVE ON FUEL

Use an app to find the cheapest petrol: MotorMouth, PetrolSpy, GasBuddy and FuelCheck can find the cheapest petrol near you. Remember to also try to fill up mid-week when prices are generally be cheaper.

Opt for ride-sharing services: Booking an Uber, or using a vehicle from GoGet are simple and affordable alternatives to using your own car – and best of all, you don’t need to fork out for the petrol used.

Make the most of petrol credit cards or vouchers: A petrol rewards card can help you minimise fuel costs while also earning rewards points. However, just be mindful of a higher annual fee that may apply.

Get your car serviced regularly: Staying up to date with car services can prevent mechanical problems from developing. Maintaining your cars top notch condition means it will run smoothly and consume less petrol.

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