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Shh! Anti-agers no one but you need know about

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Q What is the best treatment for upper lip lines between the nose and lip?

I’m in my mid-50s now, and am getting more and more self-conscious about them.

A This has always been one of the hardest areas of the face to ‘correct’, but there is a new, injectable treatment that some of the top London cosmetic doctors are raving about.

An anonymous reader wanted to know the best treatment for upper lip lines (stock photo)

An anonymous reader wanted to know the best treatment for upper lip lines (stock photo)

An anonymous reader wanted to know the best treatment for upper lip lines (stock photo)

Called Viscoderm Hydrobooster (call 0208 455 4896 for clinics), it’s a hyaluronic acid-based gel whose viscosity sits between Profhilo (which is like an injectable moisturiser that gives long-term hydration) and filler (which is much denser and ‘inflates’ areas of the face such as the lips).

No good doctor would ever try to fill out fine wrinkles with filler, as you would just end up with tiny tubes of it under the skin in place of the lines — a bad look.

However, the Hydrobooster injections can ‘both deeply hydrate and subtly stretch out superficial lines, significantly softening lip lines without the puffiness you get from filler,’ says Dr Sophie Shotter (illuminateskinclinic.co.uk), who’s a big fan.

You would need two treatments, injecting the same area twice over (anaesthetic cream is used as the jabs smart, and you will look rather swollen for a day or so); Sophie charges from £750 for the set.

Beauty director Inge van Lotringen (above) advised the reader to try Viscoderm Hydrobooster

Beauty director Inge van Lotringen (above) advised the reader to try Viscoderm Hydrobooster

Beauty director Inge van Lotringen (above) advised the reader to try Viscoderm Hydrobooster

One word of caution: there will be little bumps under the skin before the product settles and smoothes out — this is said to take days or perhaps weeks.

But, when I had it done (on the lines in my forehead, which did become a lot less visible), the bumps lasted for months.

It wasn’t dramatic, and I’m more prone than most to complications, but you should be prepared for this eventuality.

Ingeborg van Lotringen is beauty director at Cosmopolitan. Email questions to inge@dailymail.co.uk

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Mother refurbishes her old ‘shabby’ leather sofa and makes it look brand new

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A crafty mother completely refurbished her leather sofa using elbow grease and some new fabric. 

Jane Bailey, from Bournemouth, couldn’t afford a new sofa, even though her old one looked worn and ‘shabby.’ 

In order to update her living-room at a low cost, she decided to sew fabric onto the old sofa frame in order to re-upholster it. 

She only had to buy the fabric in order to complete the task, which she paid £19.50 per metre for. Jane stunned the We Love Mrs Hinch Facebook group with her results.

The sofa before. Jane Bailey, from Bournemouth, could not afford to buy a new sofa, but was tried or her worn out leather couch

The sofa before. Jane Bailey, from Bournemouth, could not afford to buy a new sofa, but was tried or her worn out leather couch

The sofa before. Jane Bailey, from Bournemouth, could not afford to buy a new sofa, but was tried or her worn out leather couch

In her initial post, she explained: ‘It was a good sound sofa but looked shabby and worn and difficult to clean. 

‘I didn’t want to buy a new one. I really enjoyed doing it. I’d love to know what things has everyone else made for their house that they we really pleased with,’ she added. 

Instead of buying a brand new sofa, Jane took the old one’s measurements in order to simply cover it with new fabric. 

She explained how she gave the sofa a make over in a comment.  

‘It’s like a jigsaw puzzle,’ she started. ‘Deconstruct your sofa – remove cushions if you can, look to see how it’s made, where are the seams.’ 

‘Make a paper pattern for each piece of current covers. Measure it and try to recreate the shape,’ she added.

With a new fabric and some elbow grease, the mother successfully re-upholstered her sofa to make it look brand new (pictured)

With a new fabric and some elbow grease, the mother successfully re-upholstered her sofa to make it look brand new (pictured)

With a new fabric and some elbow grease, the mother successfully re-upholstered her sofa to make it look brand new (pictured)

Jane also dispensed a few tips, such as leaving room for mistake by giving yourself ‘a seam allowance of at least 2 cm.’

‘Cut out the shape and pin onto the sofa – cover each surface to ensure it fits together. 

‘If you are using piping watch YouTube and make this. First make frame cover – I used a cheaper fabric under the cushions. 

‘Lay paper patterns on fabric – if using a pattern fabric you will need to try to match it (tricky). 

‘Ensure you have a seam allowance,’ she stressed. 

Members of the We Love Mrs Hinch Facebook group were blown away by Janes' results and complimented her on her DIY skills

Members of the We Love Mrs Hinch Facebook group were blown away by Janes' results and complimented her on her DIY skills

Members of the We Love Mrs Hinch Facebook group were blown away by Janes’ results and complimented her on her DIY skills

‘Cut out, draw around the line where you need to sew. Pin together,’ she said, adding she strongly recommended to rough-hand tacking the stitches first, ‘especially on tricky shapes.’ 

‘Sew with running stitch on machine,’ she added.  She first did the box arm shape, before doing the cushions, which she lined using the zipper on their back. 

She put the frame cover and tacked it underneath.  

‘I used a thin layer of wadding around the cushion pads, arm tops and kick panel area to make softer and hide the lines of the old cover,’ she concluded.

Facebook was blown away with the results. ‘Brilliant job and it looks fantastic,’ one said. 

‘That’s a brilliant transformation, well done’ wrote another. 

‘Wow what a difference. It looks like a completely new sofa. Well done you. Looks fab,’ another said.  

‘As a fellow sewer I want to say that is flipping amazing!!! You must be so chuffed with it,’ another said. 

‘It looks so good! Sending my seal of approval from the other side of the pond,’ said someone else. 

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Tiny cat-sized DEER thought to have gone extinct 30 years ago is pictured in a forest in Vietnam

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A miniature deer that was feared to have gone extinct after it was only sighted once in a century has been rediscovered in Southeast Asia.

The chevrotain, also known as the mouse-deer, is about the size of a domestic cat and dates back to the Stone Age when it was depicted in cave art.

It was believed to have been lost to time until it was spotted in the wilds of Vietnam this year – for the first time in three decades. 

Scientists have now filmed and photographed the species for the first time since 1990 when the last known specimen was killed – before then a sighting hadn’t been confirmed since 1907.

The chevrotain, also known as the mouse-deer, is about the size of a domestic cat and dates back to the Stone Age

The chevrotain, also known as the mouse-deer, is about the size of a domestic cat and dates back to the Stone Age

The chevrotain, also known as the mouse-deer, is about the size of a domestic cat and dates back to the Stone Age

The discovery could save other endangered animals being hunted out of existence to feed growing demand for bush meat.

The silver-backed chevrotain is prized by by locals who use thin wire nooses – or snares – to catch it. 

Co-leader of the study, An Nguyen, a biologist at Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC) in Austin, Texas, said: ‘For those of us living in Vietnam and working in wildlife conservation, the question of whether the chevrotain was still out there and if so, where, has been nagging us for years.

‘There was very little information available to point us in the right direction and we didn’t know what to expect.

‘That we were able to find it with so few leads and in a relatively short period of time shows how a little bit of effort and willpower can go a long way in finding some of these special species lost to science.’

It’s the first rediscovery of a mammal on GWC’s 25 most wanted lost species list. His team conducted interviews with villagers to identify possible chevrotain sightings.

They then used this local knowledge to place more than 30 motion-activated camera traps within a nearby forested habitat.

Six months of observations identified almost 300 independent detections of the animal.

The number of distinct individuals is unknown, reports Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Six months of observations identified almost 300 independent detections of the animal

Six months of observations identified almost 300 independent detections of the animal

Six months of observations identified almost 300 independent detections of the animal

An said: ‘The results were amazing. I was overjoyed when we checked the camera traps and saw photographs of a chevrotain with silver flanks.

‘With three camera traps left in the field for five months, we were able to get 275 photos of the species.

‘The Silver-backed Chevrotain went from being lost for at least 30 years, to found really within a matter of months.’

The team then set up another 29 cameras in the same area, this time recording 1,881 photographs of the chevrotain over another five months.

Co-lead author Andrew Tilker, also of GWS, described the tiny ungulate as ‘about the size of a house cat.’

He said: ‘You could hold it in one hand. Because it is so small, it would under natural conditions have a number of predators, including any leopard, tiger or wild dog – or probably even a python.

It's the first rediscovery of a mammal on Global Wildlife Conservation's 25 most wanted lost species list

It's the first rediscovery of a mammal on Global Wildlife Conservation's 25 most wanted lost species list

It’s the first rediscovery of a mammal on Global Wildlife Conservation’s 25 most wanted lost species list

‘However, most of these species are now very rare or extinct in Vietnam. The silver-backed chevrotain’s only real predator now is man.’

The biologists, who are also doctoral students at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin, tracked it down in the dry forests outside Nha Trang.

The coastal resort city in the south of the country is known for its beautiful beaches and water sports.

Andrew said: ‘Now that we have confirmed it still occurs in the forests of Vietnam, we can begin to develop an evidence-based conservation strategy to help ensure the silver-backed chevrotain retains healthy, thriving natural populations.

There is remarkably little information on the silver-backed chevrotain. The species was described in 1910 from four specimens from southern Vietnam

There is remarkably little information on the silver-backed chevrotain. The species was described in 1910 from four specimens from southern Vietnam

There is remarkably little information on the silver-backed chevrotain. The species was described in 1910 from four specimens from southern Vietnam

Fishermen discovered previously-unseen cave drawings dating back to the early Stone Age in Turkey's southeastern Adiyaman province. The carvings show hunters chasing prey

Fishermen discovered previously-unseen cave drawings dating back to the early Stone Age in Turkey's southeastern Adiyaman province. The carvings show hunters chasing prey

Fishermen discovered previously-unseen cave drawings dating back to the early Stone Age in Turkey’s southeastern Adiyaman province. The carvings show hunters chasing prey 

‘There was a certain urgency to all of this work due to the snaring crisis that is decimating wildlife populations across Southeast Asia.’

The silver-backed chevrotain is found only in Vietnam – making it vital to the biodiversity heritage cherished by its millions of inhabitants.

Andrew said: ‘It is worth safeguarding for future generations. But this is also a story that goes beyond a single country or a single species.

‘It’s a story about how species that have fallen off the scientific radar should not be written off.

‘When we come together to try to find these species, for example through Global Wildlife Conservation’s Search For Lost Species Initiative, we can be successful.

‘And these successes can provide us with rare second-chances to protect global biodiversity.’

Still in good condition, one of the etchings depicts a scene where men with horses chase a chevrotain, also known as mouse-deer

Still in good condition, one of the etchings depicts a scene where men with horses chase a chevrotain, also known as mouse-deer

Still in good condition, one of the etchings depicts a scene where men with horses chase a chevrotain, also known as mouse-deer

There is remarkably little information on the silver-backed chevrotain. The species was described in 1910 from four specimens from southern Vietnam.

Then, more than 80 years went by until the next scientifically-verified record, in a different part of Vietnam.

WHAT IS THE MOUSE-DEER?

Finding the Silver-backed Chevrotain, a deer-like species the size of a rabbit or small cat, is one of the highest mammal research priorities in the Annamite Mountains.

Until now there had only been one record of the species since 1907—an individual purportedly collected from Vietnam’s southern coast, near Nha Trang in 1990.

 It has not been reported from anywhere else in Southeast Asia and scientists know nothing about its ecology or conservation status.

If the species still exists, populations have undoubtedly declined through ongoing hunting.

Chevrotains are also known as mouse deer. 

Source: globalwildlife.org 

Andrew said: ‘Then almost 30 years went by until our study. So – as you can see, we didn’t have much to go on.

‘Indeed, it was only by working closely with local communities – first through interviews, later in the field – that we were able to obtain proof that it is still living.

‘To me, this shows the value of utilising local ecological knowledge. I believe this is a strategy that could be important for other searches for lost species.’

This month the field team will begin camera trap surveys in two additional areas. They will run for at least three months.

Andrew said: ‘Just because we found this species relatively easily doesn’t mean it’s not threatened.’

The chevrotain is one of a number of fascinating species that live in the diverse tropical forests of Southeast Asia.

Some have only been discovered in the last few decades. This includes the antelope-like Saola – dubbed the ‘Asian unicorn’ – which was only first spotted in 1992.

Animals in this area of the world, however, are victims of a devastating hunting technique – the use of cheap and homemade wire snares.

The level of indiscriminate hunting in the region has led to widespread ’empty forest syndrome’ across Vietnam – pushing numerous species to the brink of extinction.

It was believed to have been lost to time until it was spotted in the wilds of Vietnam this year – in forests around the city of Nha Trang — for the first time in three decades.

It was believed to have been lost to time until it was spotted in the wilds of Vietnam this year – in forests around the city of Nha Trang — for the first time in three decades.

It was believed to have been lost to time until it was spotted in the wilds of Vietnam this year – in forests around the city of Nha Trang — for the first time in three decades.

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Gates backs Mail on jabs: Microsoft founder joins fight after witnessing horror measles inflicts

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Bill Gates today warns parents of the ‘heartbreak’ that follows failing to vaccinate children as he throws his support behind the Daily Mail’s campaign.

The billionaire Microsoft founder says people have forgotten the death and devastation wreaked by diseases such as measles, polio and pneumonia.

Writing in today’s Mail, he describes the heart-wrenching experience of watching a child become severely ill as their body is ravaged by measles.

He refers to the ‘tragic irony’ that vaccination rates have soared in developing countries while plummeting in wealthy nations.

The billionaire Microsoft founder (pictured in Nigeria) says people have forgotten the death and devastation wreaked by diseases such as measles, polio and pneumonia

The billionaire Microsoft founder (pictured in Nigeria) says people have forgotten the death and devastation wreaked by diseases such as measles, polio and pneumonia

The billionaire Microsoft founder (pictured in Nigeria) says people have forgotten the death and devastation wreaked by diseases such as measles, polio and pneumonia

‘I can’t imagine seeing us win that fight in one part of the world, only to see us start losing it in another,’ he adds.

The Mail launched its Give Children Their Jabs campaign last month after a Government report revealed uptake had fallen for all ten routine childhood vaccinations.

Health officials are particularly worried about MMR vaccination rates, which have slipped to their lowest level for seven years. 

Mr Gates said: ‘Like others involved in the Mail’s campaign, I am concerned about the decline in Britain’s immunisation rates.’

The 64-year-old has spent years championing the importance of vaccinations through the Bill & Melinda Gates (pictured together in Mozambique in 2003) Foundation, which is devoted to improving health in developing countries

The 64-year-old has spent years championing the importance of vaccinations through the Bill & Melinda Gates (pictured together in Mozambique in 2003) Foundation, which is devoted to improving health in developing countries

The 64-year-old has spent years championing the importance of vaccinations through the Bill & Melinda Gates (pictured together in Mozambique in 2003) Foundation, which is devoted to improving health in developing countries

The 64-year-old has spent years championing the importance of vaccinations through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which is devoted to improving health in developing countries.

Mr Gates, the second-richest person in the world with a net worth of around £83billion, has donated billions of pounds to Gavi – an organisation which buys vaccines for children in poor countries. 

He is the latest influential health leader to back the Daily Mail’s campaign to vaccinate every child.

Others include Health Secretary Matt Hancock and Simon Stevens, head of NHS England.

Mr Gates (pictured with his wife Melinda in India in 2011), the second-richest person in the world with a net worth of around £83billion, has donated billions of pounds to Gavi – an organisation which buys vaccines for children in poor countries

Mr Gates (pictured with his wife Melinda in India in 2011), the second-richest person in the world with a net worth of around £83billion, has donated billions of pounds to Gavi – an organisation which buys vaccines for children in poor countries

Mr Gates (pictured with his wife Melinda in India in 2011), the second-richest person in the world with a net worth of around £83billion, has donated billions of pounds to Gavi – an organisation which buys vaccines for children in poor countries

The Mail is calling on the Government to launch a mass awareness drive to reassure parents that jabs are both safe and essential. 

We also want the NHS to introduce reminders via text message to alert busy families of upcoming vaccinations.

Figures from NHS Digital show that only 86 per cent of five-year-olds received both doses of the MMR jab in 2018/19. 

This is well below the World Health Organisation’s target of 95 per cent coverage that is needed to preserve herd immunity.

Six children are admitted to hospital with pneumonia every hour amid soaring rates of the vaccine-preventable disease, NHS figures show.

Emergency admissions have risen more than 50 per cent over the past decade, with 56,000 children taken to hospital with the condition last year.

NHS Digital data shows uptake rates for the pneumonia vaccine have plummeted. 

Last year 92.8 per cent of children received jabs, down from 94.4 per cent in 2012/13. 

Analysis from Save the Children and Unicef revealed that 27 children in England were killed by the disease last year.

Bill Gates: It’s a tragic irony that mothers in poor countries walk miles for the vaccines too many in the West shun

My wife, Melinda, and I know first-hand the power that a great article or newspaper campaign can have.

One morning 22 years ago we read a story about how each year half a million children in poor countries were being killed by a disease called rotavirus.

The disease, we learned, kills children by giving them diarrhoea, which saps them of water and nutrients. They die of dehydration.

Melinda had just given birth to our first child a year before we read that story. If our daughter had been born in a different country, we realised, she could’ve died from something as basic as diarrhoea. The idea shocked us.

My wife, Melinda, and I know first-hand the power that a great article or newspaper campaign can have. Pictured In Sokoto state, Nigeria

My wife, Melinda, and I know first-hand the power that a great article or newspaper campaign can have. Pictured In Sokoto state, Nigeria

My wife, Melinda, and I know first-hand the power that a great article or newspaper campaign can have. Pictured In Sokoto state, Nigeria

Melinda and I assumed that if there was some way to prevent rotavirus then the world would already be doing it, but we were wrong. A vaccine for rotavirus was scientifically possible in the late-1990s, but one was never tested or sold in the developing countries.

Melinda and I started wondering what other preventable diseases were still plaguing poor countries. We looked at illnesses like measles, diphtheria, tetanus, polio, pneumonia and whooping cough. The vaccines for many of these illnesses had been around for years, but millions of children were dying because their parents couldn’t afford or access them.

Over the past two decades the world has begun to solve this problem. An organisation called Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance was created in 2000.

It raises funds to buy vaccines and then supports countries as they deliver them to people in need. Since 2000, more than 760million children have been immunised.

But there’s also some tragic irony in the recent history of world health. As vaccination rates have increased in poor countries, they’ve started to drop in wealthier ones, like the United Kingdom. Like others involved in the Mail’s campaign, I am concerned about the decline in Britain’s immunisation rates.

One morning 22 years ago we read a story about how each year half a million children in poor countries were being killed by a disease called rotavirus. Pictured: In Mozambique in 2003

One morning 22 years ago we read a story about how each year half a million children in poor countries were being killed by a disease called rotavirus. Pictured: In Mozambique in 2003

One morning 22 years ago we read a story about how each year half a million children in poor countries were being killed by a disease called rotavirus. Pictured: In Mozambique in 2003

Of course, there are a lot explanations for the decline. But an important one is probably complacency – many people have forgotten how devastating these diseases can be.

In poor countries, mothers will sometimes walk miles with their small children to get to a health clinic that can administer a vaccine. They go through that effort because they know what can happen if they don’t. They’ve seen what it looks like when a child contracts measles, or rotavirus, or whooping cough, and they remember. But in rich countries like the United Kingdom or the United States, we don’t. These diseases have been rare for most of our lives.

Take measles, for example. Thanks to widespread immunisation, many of our doctors have never seen a single case, and most people without medical training don’t know what the disease can do to a child’s body.

Melinda and I have seen what can happen when children get measles. Let me tell you what it looks like.

A rash breaks out on their faces and spreads across their whole body in tight, itchy clusters. They often develop a cough, red and watery eyes, a runny nose, and a fever that can go as high as 41C. Children under five are most likely to die from measles. But before they do, they cough and sneeze – spreading the disease.

Anyone nearby can catch the measles just by breathing in the infected air or by placing their hand on an infected surface and then touching their nose, mouth or eyes. Many children do recover from measles, but up to 30 per cent have complications.

Research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute in the UK indicates that measles can lead to ‘immune amnesia’.

The disease destroys the existing defences that the body has built up against other illnesses and exposes children to the risk of new infections – sometimes lethal ones. Children with measles are more likely to catch pneumonia or encephalitis. The latter can leave a child blind, deaf or brain-damaged.

Once you have measles, there is no cure. But a vaccine can prevent it. That’s why I welcome this newspaper’s effort to raise awareness on the importance of childhood vaccination.

If immunisation rates in countries like the UK decline, communities that have forgotten about these diseases could learn about them again. But not in the newspaper, like Melinda and I did two decades ago. They will learn about them in a heartbreaking way – first-hand, watching children fall ill.

This is a fate that millions of health workers, researchers, government officials, and – most of all – parents, have tried to spare children in the developing world. It’s been the fight of a generation.

And I can’t imagine seeing us win that fight in one part of the world, only to see us start losing it in another.

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