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Simple handwashing technique can limit the spread of coronavirus, scientists reveal

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Passengers arrive at Heathrow Airport in London after the last British Airways flight from China touched down in the UK following an announcement that the airline was suspending all flights to and from mainland China with immediate effect amid the escalating coronavirus crisis. PA Photo. Picture date: Wednesday January 29, 2020. See PA story HEALTH Coronavirus. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire
Passengers arrive at Heathrow Airport in London after the last British Airways flight from China touched down in the UK following an announcement that the airline was suspending all flights from the country (Image: Steven Parsons/ PA)

Scientists have said that simple handwashing techniques could drastically limit the spread of coronavirus.

Health chiefs are trying to stop the feared disease becoming a pandemic and fear it could kill tens of millions of people.

Now researcher have claimed that ‘traveller engagement with proper hand-hygiene at all airports has the potential to reduce the risk of a potential pandemic by 24-69%’.

What this means is that people jetting off around the world should wash their hands and also use sanitiser products.

If these ‘mitigation strategies’ are implemented in ten key locations the pandemic risk can drop by up to 37%, the authors added.

The study, “Hand-hygiene mitigation strategies against global disease spreading through the air transportation network,” suggests that if increased hand-washing practices were instituted in ten key aiports including London’s Heathrow there would be a significant impact on decreasing the spread of viruses.

These ten airports ‘are not just locations that see large volumes of passengers, they also connect travelers with destinations in all parts of the world’.

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‘Airports, and airplanes, are highly infectious because they are close, confined areas with large, mobile populations,’ said Christos Nicolaides of the University of Cyprus and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

‘Viruses are spread through bodily fluids, so keeping hands clean at major transport hubs is central to control spread.’

Airports contain numerous surfaces that are frequently touched by travellers, including self-service check-in screens, gate bench armrests, water fountain buttons, door handles, seats and tray tables.

These public areas need to be cleaned regularly, whilst travellers should wash their hands, make sure they wear face masks and follow good coughing eqituwtte by only coughing into their elbow or tissues.

The researchers said that if hand cleanliness at all airports increased from 20% to 30%, the disease would have a global impact that is 24% smaller.

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Source: Metro News

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Deontay Wilder on his eight kids, fighting racism in the US and how he’ll KO Tyson Fury in Las Vegas

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The most significant moment in the life of Deontay Wilder had nothing to do with boxing or becoming heavyweight champion of the world, rightly proud though he is of that accomplishment.

It came when he was called upon to make a deeply personal and profoundly agonising choice as a poor teenager who was about to become a father.

Wilder and his then-girlfriend Helen Duncan were told that his first child would be born with spina bifida. 

Deontay Wilder opens up to Sportsmail on life as a father to eight children by four women

Deontay Wilder opens up to Sportsmail on life as a father to eight children by four women

Deontay Wilder opens up to Sportsmail on life as a father to eight children by four women

Wilder spoke to Sportsmail's Jeff Powell about home comforts in the build up to his next fight

Wilder spoke to Sportsmail's Jeff Powell about home comforts in the build up to his next fight

Wilder spoke to Sportsmail’s Jeff Powell about home comforts in the build up to his next fight

The Bronze Bomber also explains how he'll knockout Tyson Fury in Las Vegas next Saturday

The Bronze Bomber also explains how he'll knockout Tyson Fury in Las Vegas next Saturday

The Bronze Bomber also explains how he’ll knockout Tyson Fury in Las Vegas next Saturday

‘It had been scary first off to know I had a child on the way,’ he says. ‘It was even scarier that this tiny being would be coming into the world with a defect.

‘I was so young, holding my whole world in my hands. Suddenly I was facing this huge responsibility for a life which would need my enormous care and attention.

‘The doctors told us she would never walk. Told us maybe she would never have a child’s natural ability for learning. They offered us the opportunity to terminate.

‘This was the most important decision of my life. To keep her or not to keep her. Thank God I got it right. We just felt she had a right to live.’ Vindication has come with every improving day of Naieya’s life and the 6ft 7in 34-year-old whose business is knocking out all the other giants of the prize ring is glowing with love and delight as this daughter approaches her 15th birthday, on March 20. 

Wilder's youngest daughter, Naieya, was born with a spinal condition called spina bifida

Wilder's youngest daughter, Naieya, was born with a spinal condition called spina bifida

Wilder’s youngest daughter, Naieya, was born with a spinal condition called spina bifida 

Naieya, 15, has defied the prognosis of doctors and is flourishing academically and in sport

Naieya, 15, has defied the prognosis of doctors and is flourishing academically and in sport

Naieya, 15, has defied the prognosis of doctors and is flourishing academically and in sport

‘Doctors can do all that studying and acquire all that knowledge,’ says Wilder. ‘But what they cannot account for is a miracle, The miracle that is our Naieya. She’s not just walking, she’s running. She’s not only going to school, she’s one of smartest girls in her class. So clever. So intelligent.

‘The experience with her matured me early. Seeing her overcome adversity so many times inspired me to do the same. Even before she was born she taught me the importance of always making the right decisions. 

‘She’s such a bright spark lighting up my life, as are all my children with their different characters and personalities. I love them all.’ All eight of them. By four different mothers including the latest addition with Telli Swift, the fiancée soon to become his second wife.

Wilder will be happy if he finishes the job of knocking out Tyson Fury, who he floored twice in their drawn first fight. He says: ‘Yes, I want to prove to the world that I’m the best heavyweight of this generation. Perhaps the best ever because when I knock out Tyson it will be in my 11th straight world heavyweight title fight, which is closing in on Muhammad Ali’s record.

‘This is now the biggest fight of my life but my best days of all are when I have all the kids at home with me. Sometimes with all their mothers. Even a couple of my mothers-in-law. I love them, too. I have a big, beautiful family. The way we are together is amazing. There’s no trouble. I don’t want a stressful life. I lead a loving life. We lead a regular life even though we have all we need and more. Simplicity is the key.’ 

Wilder is desperate to prove himself as the best heavyweight of his generation by beating Fury

Wilder is desperate to prove himself as the best heavyweight of his generation by beating Fury

Wilder is desperate to prove himself as the best heavyweight of his generation by beating Fury

Preparation for a large family came from being the eldest of eight siblings. As did the aspiration for greatness. 

He recalls: ‘The house was always full. Some nights when everyone was at home and two of my sisters brought their kids there was no bed for me and I had to sleep outside in the back of our old car. As the oldest I got to do the majority of the chores as well as look after the others.’ 

Tuscaloosa is home to the University of Alabama, for whose fabled college champions football team the Crimson Tide he dreamed of playing.

Poor high school grades partly put paid that ambition and he had to go to a tough community college ‘where they made fun of my old hand-me-down clothes and worn out shoes so I turned to boxing.’ 

There was also the more pressing need to boost the family income: ‘We were always struggling to make ends meet. Living from pay cheque to pay cheque. So I got a job as a server at the local IHOP.’ That is short for the International House Of Pancakes fast food chain and Wilder adds: ‘I used to make pretty good tips. I always kept my station spotless clean.  

Wilder wanted to become an NFL player before turning to boxing when he was a teenager

Wilder wanted to become an NFL player before turning to boxing when he was a teenager

Wilder wanted to become an NFL player before turning to boxing when he was a teenager

The 34-year-old has remained in his hometown of Tuscaloosa, Alabama throughout his career

The 34-year-old has remained in his hometown of Tuscaloosa, Alabama throughout his career

The 34-year-old has remained in his hometown of Tuscaloosa, Alabama throughout his career

‘At first people thought I must be a basketball or football player and talked to me about sports. Then they wouldn’t sit at any tables but mine and they would tell me very personal things about their lives.

‘For some reason they clung to me. It became like having another large family. I got my social skills from my mother. She loved talking to people and like her I’m happy to meet people. I don’t think I’m better than anyone because I’m the world champion and I’ve got millions in the bank.

‘I’m still like everyone else. I had to fight my way up. I always know the price of milk. I’m a people person and I won’t let anyone take real life away from me. No-one.’ Certainly not the racists against whom Wilder, like virtually all African-Americans here in the Deep South, is still fighting.

One way of reaching his charming Gone With The Wind home city which is frequently voted the No 1 most liveable town in America is via the Alabama state capital of Montgomery.

Signs in the arrivals area of the airport there include a reminder that Martin Luther King Jr served several years as pastor at a local church, alongside an illustrated declaration that The March Goes On.

‘Yes it does,’ says Wilder. ‘The struggle continues. It’s still as alive, still as real as back in the day of the Million Man March. It’s appalling that it’s more out in the open now. What used to go on in the dark now goes on in the light. We can see videos of racist remarks and racist acts yet even though the proof is there plain as day those people don’t get found guilty. 

Wilder says he is using his fame to raise awareness of racism in southern America

Wilder says he is using his fame to raise awareness of racism in southern America

Wilder says he is using his fame to raise awareness of racism in southern America

Wilder believes police aren't doing enough to punish people that are found guilty of racism

Wilder believes police aren't doing enough to punish people that are found guilty of racism

Wilder believes police aren’t doing enough to punish people that are found guilty of racism

‘I’m black and famous so I use my platform to put things out there. When those moments come I give it my all. I don’t hold nothing back. I’ve not changed down the years of my success. Same walk. Same talk. Some people may not like it but they gotta respect it.

‘Other people don’t know what black people have to go through. They don’t have to live with hatred every day. They don’t see the eyes of prejudice staring them in the face.

‘Like they say, walk in my shoes. Then you might understand what I’ve been through. What it feels like to be called a certain word or to witness police brutality.

‘Usually if I see a bad situation my size and presence is enough to stop it. But I often ask myself what I would do if a terrible act against someone vulnerable carried on. I know what damage I’m capable of. But I can’t promise I would turn a deaf ear and walk away. I can’t promise I wouldn’t help that person. I can’t promise I would never lash out.’ 

Tuscaloosa is where the first black girl to be admitted to a segregated southern university, Autherine Lucy, was denied entrance until US marshalls famously forced Alabama governor George Wallace to step aside from barring the main door.

Now it is Wilder’s refuge from such dark realities: There is a sign on his gym wall which reads Sweet Home Alabama. ‘I love this place,’ he says. 

Wilder has admitted he could 'lash out' and use violence to help someone in trouble

Wilder has admitted he could 'lash out' and use violence to help someone in trouble

Wilder has admitted he could ‘lash out’ and use violence to help someone in trouble

‘Everyone talks about how they like to come home. But it’s all the more beautiful when you are coming to the place that’s always been your home. To where you were born.’ 

Which brings him back to Fury, who has suddenly changed his trainer from the defence-orientated Ben Davison to the great Emmanuel Steward’s attack-minded nephew Javan SugerHill Steward.

To which Wilder says: ‘I would no more change my trainer (Jay Deas) than I would change where I live. Why would I want to move to New York, Los Angeles or Miami when this is where I have tranquillity. 

‘I’m a home boy. I like being surrounded by family but I also like being home alone sometimes. To meditate. To train my brain to solve problems, which is as important for me as training my body.’ 

That remarkably slender body for a heavyweight which enables him to throw those knock-out punches at irresistible speed. 

The heavyweight says he'd never change his trainer like Fury has done numerous times

The heavyweight says he'd never change his trainer like Fury has done numerous times

The heavyweight says he’d never change his trainer like Fury has done numerous times

Fury insists he is going for a second round KO next Saturday in Las Vegas for fear that he might be robbed, as he sees it, for a second time. 

That draw achieved by him somehow rising semi-conscious from a last round flattening enabled Wilder to keep his WBC title and he says: ‘If Tyson comes out charging at me he really is crazy. People say I can’t box on the back foot but the majority of my knock-outs have been inflicted when I’ve been on the back foot.’ 

The build-up has been more respectful thus far and Wilder says: ‘So it should be. We’ve shared our energy in the ring and Tyson has felt the wrath of my power. The myth of that power is always in the back of the minds of all my foes. 

‘They are always wondering ”when he hits me what’s going to happen to me.” 

‘If I’d been knocked unconscious the way I knocked Tyson unconscious in our first fight it sure would be on my mind. I know it’s on his mind and his family’s. I’ve seen videos of them saying they don’t want him to do this again. 

Wilder says Fury is 'crazy' if he attempts to come forward and trade with him next Saturday

Wilder says Fury is 'crazy' if he attempts to come forward and trade with him next Saturday

Wilder says Fury is ‘crazy’ if he attempts to come forward and trade with him next Saturday

‘I know what’s going on. Just because you don’t see people it doesn’t mean we’re not watching. We’ve got our spies all over the world. My CIA. Even the birds talk.’ 

We are talking in a cubby-hole of a room in a corner of that dilapidated gym, which occupies two of a few mostly deserted lock up storage units tucked away in a small clearing in woods on the edge of town.

Rain is hammering on the tin roof and old buckets are catching the drips around the ring.

It is here that this loving father prepares for ‘my transformation into this beast called the Bronze Bomber on fight night.’ 

That process will become complete when he puts on one of his garish, wolf-like face masks and enters the MGM Grand Garden Arena on the Vegas Strip. 

Wilder is convinced the punches he hit Fury with will be in the back of the Gypsy King's mind

Wilder is convinced the punches he hit Fury with will be in the back of the Gypsy King's mind

Wilder is convinced the punches he hit Fury with will be in the back of the Gypsy King’s mind

Wilder talks a lot about energy but he saves it for his big fights inside the ring and against racial abuse outside.

Talk of the third man in the world heavyweight championship equation, Anthony Joshua, is banned in this camp because Wilder is convinced the holder of all the other alpha-belts will neve risk fighting him.

Still I press him to condense his thoughts into Joshua into one word. He says: ‘Coward.’ 

And a word for Fury, please. He pauses, gives me a copy of a signed children’s comic book about his life, then smiles as he says: ‘Amen.’

 

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Father-to-be rings 999 call handler who talked him through his son’s birth on the M5

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A 999 call of the moment a panicking father rang for help as his baby boy was born on a busy motorway has been released by an ambulance service. 

Jayne Rowland, 36, was on her way to Musgrove Park Hospital in Taunton when she went into the final stages of labour while in roadworks on the M5 in Somerset.

Her partner, Joshua Mogg, 29, called for help and just two minutes later their son Harry was born in the car while on the southbound carriageway near junction 24.

Emergency services arrived moments after the birth to find the family stopped on the inside lane of the motorway as there was no hard shoulder.

Joshua Mogg, 29, called 999 after his partner Jayne Rowland, 36, went into the final stages of labour while they were stuck in roadworks on the M5 in Somerset. Two minutes later, their son Harry was born (the parents, baby Harry and eight-year-old son Benjamin are seen thanking members of the ambulance service for their help)

Joshua Mogg, 29, called 999 after his partner Jayne Rowland, 36, went into the final stages of labour while they were stuck in roadworks on the M5 in Somerset. Two minutes later, their son Harry was born (the parents, baby Harry and eight-year-old son Benjamin are seen thanking members of the ambulance service for their help)

Joshua Mogg, 29, called 999 after his partner Jayne Rowland, 36, went into the final stages of labour while they were stuck in roadworks on the M5 in Somerset. Two minutes later, their son Harry was born (the parents, baby Harry and eight-year-old son Benjamin are seen thanking members of the ambulance service for their help)

The 999 call begins with Mr Mogg telling call handler Jonathan Leaton: ‘I think she’s almost about to pop… I’m in the roadworks at 50 miles an hour.’

Mr Leaton instructs Mr Mogg, from Street, Somerset, to put his hazard lights on and pull over shortly before little Harry was born.

Traffic can be heard driving past as Harry’s mother says ‘hello’ to her new son, followed by proud father Mr Mogg telling him: ‘Hello mister.’

The couple had been travelling to Taunton for Ms Rowland to be induced at 9.30am on November 1. However little Harry was born in the front passenger seat of the car at 7.57am, just 30 minutes after they had left home.

He weighed 7lb 8oz and his birth certificate has the place of birth recorded as M5.

Ms Rowland, a teaching assistant, said: ‘I’d had discomfort for around three weeks, and didn’t feel anything different when I woke up that day. But the pain got worse and worse in the car, so I asked Josh to pull over.’ 

The couple had been travelling to Taunton for Ms Rowland to be induced at 9.30am on November 1. However little Harry was born in the front passenger seat of the car at 7.57am, just 30 minutes after they had left home

The couple had been travelling to Taunton for Ms Rowland to be induced at 9.30am on November 1. However little Harry was born in the front passenger seat of the car at 7.57am, just 30 minutes after they had left home

The couple had been travelling to Taunton for Ms Rowland to be induced at 9.30am on November 1. However little Harry was born in the front passenger seat of the car at 7.57am, just 30 minutes after they had left home

Ms Rowland, (pictured) a teaching assistant, praised a lorry driver who shielded the family from traffic by stopping and putting his hazard warning lights on

Ms Rowland, (pictured) a teaching assistant, praised a lorry driver who shielded the family from traffic by stopping and putting his hazard warning lights on

Ms Rowland, (pictured) a teaching assistant, praised a lorry driver who shielded the family from traffic by stopping and putting his hazard warning lights on

She added: ‘Everything seemed to happen very quickly. The call handler talked it through with us, and then the paramedics and police arrived. 

‘They all made such a difference. We’re so thankful. I just wanted to get to the hospital safely and on time.

‘It wasn’t until afterwards that I realised how much danger we were in, because there was nowhere safe to stop in the roadworks.’

She also praised a lorry driver who shielded the family from traffic by stopping and putting his hazard warning lights on.

Harry, his parents and brother Benjamin, eight, visited Taunton Ambulance Station on February 13 to thank the staff from South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust in person.

Audio of the 999 call reveals Mr Mogg (pictured centre with his partner, sons and paramedics) telling the handler where they are on the M5 and that they've managed to pull over to the side

Audio of the 999 call reveals Mr Mogg (pictured centre with his partner, sons and paramedics) telling the handler where they are on the M5 and that they've managed to pull over to the side

Audio of the 999 call reveals Mr Mogg (pictured centre with his partner, sons and paramedics) telling the handler where they are on the M5 and that they’ve managed to pull over to the side

Mr Mogg, a tree surgeon, said: ‘Jayne was my priority. So I was first trying to get her to hospital as quickly and safely as possible. Then I just had to get out of the car and get on with it. 

‘Delivering my baby son on a motorway is probably the best thing I’ve done in my life. I feel it’s given me a stronger bond with Harry.’

The couple also expressed thanks to Avon and Somerset Police officers who returned their car and personal possessions from the scene to them.

Mr Leaton, who talked the parents through the motorway delivery, said: ‘They both did incredibly well throughout the entire call.

‘They remained calm and followed every instruction which ensured the best possible outcome.’

Operations officer Dan Wilsher was first on the scene before he was joined by paramedic Simon White and student paramedic Alexandra Luxton.

‘I remember being very aware of the safety aspect, as Josh and Jayne’s car was in a live traffic lane,’ Mr Wilsher said.

‘When I approached the passenger door, I saw a tiny little face wrapped in blankets looking back at me. It’s certainly an incident I won’t forget!’

‘That was quick little one!’: What father said during 999 call as his baby boy was born on the M5

Joshua Mogg rang 999 after realising his partner, Jayne Rowland, was going to give birth on the motorway.

A transcript of the call, lasting two minutes and 13 seconds, reads:

Call handler Jonathan Leaton (JL): ‘Ambulance service, is the patient breathing?’

Joshua Mogg (JM): ‘Yes she is, she’s in labour. I think she’s almost about to pop and I’m on the M25 heading south. Sorry M5.’

JL: ‘You’re on the M5?’

JM: ‘Yeah.’

JL: ‘Whereabouts on the M5?’

JM: ‘Heading southbound between Bridgwater and Taunton junction. Between 24 and 25. I’m in the roadworks at 50 miles an hour.’

JL: ‘OK, for us to get an ambulance over there to you, you do need to pull over. You just need to slow down gradually, put on your hazards, and you need to stop in the first lane for me as far over to the left as you can.’

JM: ‘I am stopped now.’

JL: ‘That’s good, well done. Leave your hazards on. How many weeks pregnant is she?’

JM: ‘Literally 40 weeks and one day. She was meant to be induced at 9.30 this morning but obviously it’s all happening a bit earlier.’

JL: ‘Can you see any part of the baby now?’

JM: ‘Er, yeah.’

JL: ‘Is she having contractions?’

JM: ‘Definitely.’

JL: ‘Is there any serious bleeding?’

JM: ‘No, I think it’s just from where the baby is trying to push out.’

JL: ‘I’m organising all the help for you now. Stay on the line and I’ll tell you exactly what to do next. Do not try to prevent the birth. OK. Just assume the most comfortable position and take deep breaths between each contraction. You can listen carefully and do exactly what I say. You need to be on your back, as flat as you can.’

JM: ‘Yep. Baby’s coming out. Baby’s out.’

JL: ‘Leave the baby between the mother’s legs, level with her bottom. Is the baby crying or breathing?’

Jayne Rowland (JR): ‘Yes.’

JM: ‘He’s coughing.’

JR: ‘He’s coughing. Hello!’

JM: ‘Hello mister.’

JR: ‘Oh, that was quick little one.’

JL: ‘Does he have a name?’

JR: ‘Harry’.’

JL: ‘Harry, excellent. Congratulations guys, you’ve done really well.’

JM: ‘Thank you.’

JL: ‘Quite a story, delivering on the M5.’

JR: ‘I knew it’d be quick but…’

JM: ‘… not this quick. Oh here we are, I can hear something. The ambulance has come now so.’

JL: ‘I’ll leave you with them, OK. You’ve done really well, guys. Congratulations.’

JM: ‘He’s crying now. Thank you so much.’

JR: ‘Thank you so much.’

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Making Moves! Duchess Kate Talks Motherhood in Podcast Debut

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Go, girl! Duchess Kate is set to make her podcast debut on Saturday, February 15.

Kensington Palace announced via Instagram on Friday, February 14, that the Duchess of Cambridge will join author Giovanna Fletcher’s “Happy Mum, Happy Baby” podcast, where she will discuss motherhood and her interest in the early years of childhood. Kate, 38, will also speak about her “5 Big Questions” survey, which she launched last month as a way to further comprehend childhood development.

Duchess Kate Makes Podcast Debut
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Giovanna Fletcher. Courtesy of Kensington Palace/Instagram

“On the special episode of ‘Happy Mum, Happy Baby’, released on Saturday, 15th February at 1600 GMT The Duchess and Giovanna discuss the importance of the early years, their shared experiences as mothers to three children, and The Duchess’s ‘5 Big Questions on the Under fives’ survey,” the caption of Kensington Palace’s post read, advising people to “visit the link in our bio to complete the survey 📋 and help bring about positive, lasting change for generations to come.”

During her podcast appearance, Kate opened up about being a mother to Prince George, 6, Princess Charlotte, 4, and Prince Louis, 20 months, who she shares with her husband, Prince William. In doing so, she revealed that her experiences with her grandmother have inspired the way she’s raised her own children.

“I had an amazing Granny who devoted a lot of time to us — playing with us, doing arts and crafts, and going to the greenhouse to do gardening, and cooking with us,” she says in the upcoming episode, per Town & Country. “And I try and incorporate a lot of the experiences that she gave us at the time into the experiences that I give my children now.”

Fletcher, 35, expressed her excitement for Kate joining her on the special episode. “So… this happened. HAPPY MUM, HAPPY BABY with The Duchess of Cambridge will be available tomorrow from 4 p.m.,” the British author wrote on Instagram, captioning a promotional photo of the episode that featured the duo. “The Duchess talks about her work and passion for the Early Years, as well as her personal experiences of motherhood.”

Fletcher continued, “It was a total joy to sit and chat! I can’t wait for you to hear this episode of the podcast!”

Since joining the British royal family, early childhood development has become one of Kate’s most prominent causes. She previously opened up about her commitment to the issue in May 2019.

“In recent years I have focused much of my work on the early years and how instrumental they are for outcomes later in life,” she said in a statement via Kensington Palace’s Instagram. “I believe that spending time outdoors when we are young can play a role in laying the foundations for children to become happy, healthy adults.”

The “Happy Mum, Happy Baby” podcast is available wherever podcasts are streamed.

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