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U.S. Attorney General William Barr to testify over Roger Stone’s lowered sentence

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U.S. Attorney General William Barr has agreed to testify before the House Judiciary Committee next month, appearing for the first time before the panel as questions swirl about whether he intervened in the case of a longtime ally of U.S. President Donald Trump.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., released a letter Wednesday to Barr “to confirm your agreement to testify” on March 31. In the letter, Nadler and committee Democrats write that they have concerns that Barr has misused the criminal justice system for political purposes.

“In your tenure as attorney general, you have engaged in a pattern of conduct in legal matters relating to the president that raises significant concerns for this committee,” Nadler and the Democrats wrote.

READ MORE: Trial team quits after U.S. says it will lower Roger Stone’s prison sentence

The Justice Department confirmed Barr would testify. His appearance will be the first before the House Judiciary panel since he became attorney general a year ago, and since he declined an invitation to testify about special counsel Robert Mueller’s report after it was released.

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The Democrats said they plan to ask Barr about the department’s decision this week to overrule four federal prosecutors and lower the amount of prison time it would seek for Trump’s confidant Roger Stone. The four prosecutors immediately quit the case, in which Stone was convicted of lying to Congress, witness tampering and obstructing the House investigation into whether the Trump campaign co-ordinated with Russia to tip the 2016 election.

They said they will also ask Barr about his department’s announcement that it is taking information that Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani is gathering in Ukraine about the president’s Democratic rival Joe Biden and his son. The House voted in December to impeach Trump because of his pressure on Ukraine to investigate Democrats; the GOP-led Senate acquitted him this month.

Trump says Roger Stone prosecutors ‘oughtta go back to school’
Trump says Roger Stone prosecutors ‘oughtta go back to school’

“In the past week alone, you have taken steps that raise grave questions about your leadership,” the Democrats wrote.

After the department indicated it would overrule the prosecutors, Trump tweeted congratulations to Barr “for taking charge of a case that was totally out of control and perhaps should not have been brought,” suggesting the prosecutors had gone rogue.

The department insisted the decision to undo the sentencing recommendation was made Monday night, before Trump began tweeting about it, and that prosecutors had not spoken to the White House about it.

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The Senate has shown less interest in grilling Barr on the Stone episode, defending the department’s decision to reduce the sentence and saying they didn’t expect to call him specifically to discuss it.

READ MORE: Trump ally Roger Stone found guilty of lying to Congress, witness tampering

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said Wednesday that he had spoken to the Justice Department and was told that their sentencing guidelines call for three and a half or four and a half years, instead of the seven to nine years the prosecutors had recommended.

“I don’t think any of us should tweet about an ongoing case, but having said that, I appreciate the Department of Justice making sure that their recommendations to the court are to seek justice for the law as it’s written,” Graham said.

© 2020 The Canadian Press

Source: Global News

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Backpackers enjoy booze-fuelled party on a Kings Cross hostel rooftop before police swoop

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Backpackers, house party revellers, beachgoers and fitness fanatics who breach tough new coronavirus social distancing measures are in the sights of police.

Officers were out in force at beaches and parks across Sydney on Tuesday to stop people flouting restrictions on gatherings of more than two people and non-essential movements. 

Backpackers have been singled out in the police blitz after a virus cluster emerged in the city’s eastern suburbs, a hotspot for young travellers who mostly stay in cramped hostels.

Despite the police presence – and repeated warnings people face fines of up to $11,000 and even jail for flouting the rules – it seems some haven’t got the message. 

At Kings Cross on Tuesday night, a group of backpackers were spotted partying on the rooftop of a hostel. 

Police were called to a hostel in Kings Cross to break up this rooftop social gathering, where revellers were visibly flouting social distancing rules

Police were called to a hostel in Kings Cross to break up this rooftop social gathering, where revellers were visibly flouting social distancing rules

Police were called to a hostel in Kings Cross to break up this rooftop social gathering, where revellers were visibly flouting social distancing rules

The footage, obtained by Channel Seven, shows a group of 11 revellers surrounded by cans and glass bottles, clearly defying the 1.5metre distancing and two-person gathering rules. 

NSW Police confirmed officers attended the hostel at about 7.15pm in response to a ‘noise complaint’.

Police were seen in the footage moving through the hostel before breaking up the social gathering.

‘Police spoke to and reminded to management and guests of the social distancing obligations in accordance with ministerial directions under Public Health Act,’ a spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia.

‘No further action was taken.’   

Young people kick a soccer ball while other sunbathe on the grass at Sydney's Bondi Beach on Tuesday

Young people kick a soccer ball while other sunbathe on the grass at Sydney's Bondi Beach on Tuesday

Young people kick a soccer ball while other sunbathe on the grass at Sydney’s Bondi Beach on Tuesday

Earlier on Tuesday, police were out in force at Greenhills Beach at Cronulla, Sydney’s south, where fitness fanatics spotted using off-limits outdoor gym equipment were issued with warnings. 

In the city’s east, crowds of sunbathers were told to move on at Bondi while at Rushcutters Bay Park, five police cars were used to disperse crowds.

The officers did not leave their cars while telling groups sitting on the grass they were violating the new public health restrictions. 

A NSW Police spokeswoman was unaware of the number of warnings issued across Sydney on Tuesday. 

New restrictions on gatherings and movements which ban people from leaving home without a reasonable excuse, but this did not deter sunbakers at Mackenzies Bay (pictured)

New restrictions on gatherings and movements which ban people from leaving home without a reasonable excuse, but this did not deter sunbakers at Mackenzies Bay (pictured)

New restrictions on gatherings and movements which ban people from leaving home without a reasonable excuse, but this did not deter sunbakers at Mackenzies Bay (pictured)

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller hasn’t ruled out even tougher restrictions.

‘We’re prepared … I’d much rather work with the community,’ he told Seven News.

Federal Liberal MP Jason ­Falinski has expressed concern on how the current restrictions are being policed in NSW.

‘This is a major infringement on a free and fair society and we can’t endure that for long,’ Mr Falinski told The Australian.

‘I think parks are pretty low-hanging fruit. You cannot have in a free society the movement of people being subject to confinement and monitoring in that way. It is an anathema to the country that we live in.’

Mr Falinski called for more policing of businesses and locations where the social distancing rules were being ignored, including backpacker hostels.

‘The beaches, the backpackers, the bigger ones,’ he said.

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 4,559

New South Wales: 2,032

Victoria: 917

Queensland: 743

Western Australia: 364

South Australia: 337

Australian Capital Territory: 80

Tasmania: 69

Northern Territory: 15

TOTAL CASES:  4,559

RECOVERED: 312

DEAD: 19

Meanwhile, NSW Health authorities are ramping up coronavirus testing in Sydney’s eastern suburbs where clusters of the disease have developed within the backpacker community.

Waverley Council, which takes in Bondi, has the highest number of cases of any Sydney local government area.

The figure has jumped up by a third from 105 to 140 in the last five days. 

At least 21 cases came from an unknown source of infection. 

There were 2032 coronavirus cases in NSW on Tuesday, an increase of 114 on the previous day. The statewide death toll remains at eight.

It was the second consecutive day of a fall in the number of disease confirmations.

But NSW chief health officer Dr Kerry Chant said that may reflect reduced testing over the weekend.

Some 35 of the infected people are in intensive care.

‘Obviously, access to GPs over the weekend may have accounted for it,’ Dr Chant told reporters on Tuesday.

‘I’m just very cautious in interpreting the numbers because I know it has to be interpreted in the context of the testing rates.’

NSW Health is now directing doctors in Sydney’s Waverley Council area – which includes suburbs such as Bondi – to send more patients for COVID-19 testing.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian urged people to remain home unless it was essential to go out, while gatherings of more than two people – apart from immediate family – indoors and outdoors are banned.

Police issued warnings to fitness fanatics using the off-limits outdoor gym equipment at Greenhills Beach in Cronulla on Tuesday

Police issued warnings to fitness fanatics using the off-limits outdoor gym equipment at Greenhills Beach in Cronulla on Tuesday

Police issued warnings to fitness fanatics using the off-limits outdoor gym equipment at Greenhills Beach in Cronulla on Tuesday

People in their 20s and 30s were the worst offenders when it came to flouting social isolation rules, she added.

The premier reiterated it was too soon to know if NSW had successfully ‘flattened the curve’ after a series of shutdown measures.

‘What’s of concern to all of us is the unknown, that level of community-to-community transmission. That’s the real threat – people walking around without symptoms, not realising they have this disease,’ Ms Berejiklian said.

Commissioner Mick Fuller has warned police will no longer issue cautions for those flouting self-isolation rules and instead hand out $1000 on-the-spot fines.

Police can also arrest and charge people who repeatedly ignore health orders, which could incur a maximum penalty of six months in prison.

Crowds of sunbakers are spotted on the rocks at Mackenzies Bay in Sydney's east on Tuesday

Crowds of sunbakers are spotted on the rocks at Mackenzies Bay in Sydney's east on Tuesday

Crowds of sunbakers are spotted on the rocks at Mackenzies Bay in Sydney’s east on Tuesday

Tough new coronavirus restrictions explained  

Only two people should gather in public spaces and ‘other areas of gathering: Households – no matter how large – can still go outside together, but individual people can only meet with one other person. The two-person limit doesn’t apply to workplaces, schools or households. 

Moratorium on evictions from rental properties for the next six months: Scott Morrison said State and Territories will be moving to ban landlords from evicting tenants who are struggling to pay rent. Mr Morrison urged landlords to work with their tenants and banks on immediate solutions. 

Playgrounds, skate parks, and outdoor gyms will be closed from Monday: Boot camps will be reduced to one-on-one outdoor personal training sessions. 

Australians urged to only shop for the essentials and nothing more: Mr Morrison reminded people it isn’t a time for browsing or catching up with friends. ‘When you are going out for shopping, you should be going for just stuff you need and do it and get home,’ he said. 

People aged over 70 or having chronic illnesses are discouraged from leaving their homes: Mr Morrison said elderly people should only go outside for doctor’s appointments or medical reasons. He said vulnerable groups who need help with shopping should access ‘support through their community or others’.

WHAT CAN I LEAVE MY HOUSE FOR? 

Buying essential supplies: Scott Morrison said shopping should be done solo and not turned into impromptu gatherings.

Going to work, if unable to work from home: Australians who have the ability to work from home are strongly advised to do so. Those who can’t must follow social distancing measures when at their place of work. 

Exercise: People working out should still follow the two-person limit. All boot camps of 10 people or less have effectively been banned. 

To attend personal medical appointments, or for compassionate reasons: Elderly people in particular should only go outside for doctor’s appointments or medical reasons.

CAN I VISIT FAMILY MEMBERS?

Yes, however social distancing measures should still be adhered to. 

A family split across two houses can meet in private, allowing people to visit their partner, siblings or parents.

People who live alone can only invite one friend over, while households of two people or more can’t have any visitors. 

WHAT ABOUT HOUSEHOLDS WITH MORE THAN TWO PEOPLE?

Households – no matter how large – can still go outside together, but individual people can only meet with one other person.

If four people live together in a house, all four of them can take their dog for a walk.  

The two-person limit doesn’t apply to workplaces, schools or households.

CAN OLDER PEOPLE GO OUT IN PUBLIC?

Elderly people are allowed to go outside for the same reasons as young people, but Scott Morrison has urged those over the age of 70 to self-isolate unless going to a medical appointment. 

‘This does not mean they cannot go outside,’ Mr Morrison said on Sunday. 

‘They can go outside and be accompanied by a support person for the purposes of getting fresh air and recreation, but should limit contact with others as much as possible.’

CAN I GO TO A WEDDING OR A FUNERAL?

Last week’s rules pertaining to weddings and funerals haven’t changed. 

Funerals are still limited to 10 people and weddings to five – including the officiator and the bride and groom.

WHEN DO THE NEW MEASURES COME INTO EFFECT?  

The two-person rule will begin on Monday, while playgrounds, outdoor gyms and skate parks will be closed at midday.  

REVEALED: The 16 different reasons you can give police to escape being given $11,000 fines for leaving your home while coronavirus restrictions are in place

There are 16 different reasons police will accept if they pull you up for being outside while coronavirus restrictions are in place.

The new rules have been introduced to slow the spread of coronavirus, and each Australian state and territory has different fines for breaking the rules.

New South Wales has some of the toughest penalties, and anyone caught flouting the rules in the state could be fined up to $11,000.

However, you can dodge a fine if you have a ‘reasonable excuse’ for leaving your home. 

The NSW Government has identified 16 acceptable excuses for leaving your home during the next month, which includes getting food, going to work or dropping kids off at school. 

There are 16 different reasons police will accept if they pull you up for being outside while coronavirus restrictions are in place, one excuses is attending a wedding (Pictured: newlyweds posing for a photo in Sydney)

There are 16 different reasons police will accept if they pull you up for being outside while coronavirus restrictions are in place, one excuses is attending a wedding (Pictured: newlyweds posing for a photo in Sydney)

There are 16 different reasons police will accept if they pull you up for being outside while coronavirus restrictions are in place, one excuses is attending a wedding (Pictured: newlyweds posing for a photo in Sydney) 

Exercising is also an acceptable reason for leaving your home, as is attending a wedding or a funeral. 

Police can’t fine you if you are moving house or on your way to donate blood.  

What can you be fined $11,000 for in New South Wales?

Under an emergency directive signed by NSW Health Minister Brad Hazzard, people can be fined $11,000 and/or be be jailed for six months for breaking strict social-distancing rules.

Examples of ‘reasonable excuses’ listed in the emergency directive are: obtaining food or other goods and services, travelling for the purposes of work or education if the person cannot do it at home, exercise, or medical or caring reasons.

People are also stopped from gathering in a public place with more than one other person.

Exceptions to the gathering rule include: gatherings of members of the same household, and gatherings essential for work or education. 

People in NSW can be fined $11,000 for leaving their homes without a ‘reasonable excuse’ under an emergency directive signed on Monday night. 

They could also be given a $5,500 fine for each day they continue to break the rules, the emergency directive states.

The NSW Government is urging the community to keep social gatherings to a minimum and obey new regulations as the state boasts the highest number of coronavirus cases in the country.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said people in their 20s and 30s were the worst offenders when it came to flouting social isolation rules. 

She implored them not to put the vulnerable at risk.

Unless there is a significant and unexpected spike in COVID-19 cases in the state, the current restrictions will not be revised for a month, she said.

‘Health experts have told us they’d like to maintain the restrictions we’ve put in place for at least the next month and then assess,’ she said on Monday.

While many classrooms are empty across the country, you can still get away with leaving your home if you are dropping your kids to school (pictured: An empty classroom in Brisbane)

While many classrooms are empty across the country, you can still get away with leaving your home if you are dropping your kids to school (pictured: An empty classroom in Brisbane)

While many classrooms are empty across the country, you can still get away with leaving your home if you are dropping your kids to school (pictured: An empty classroom in Brisbane) 

Grocery shopping is also an acceptable excuse for leaving your home - hoarding toilet paper is not (pictured: People receiving toilet paper, paper towel and pasta as a police officer watches on at Coles Supermarket, Epping in Sydney)

Grocery shopping is also an acceptable excuse for leaving your home - hoarding toilet paper is not (pictured: People receiving toilet paper, paper towel and pasta as a police officer watches on at Coles Supermarket, Epping in Sydney)

Grocery shopping is also an acceptable excuse for leaving your home – hoarding toilet paper is not (pictured: People receiving toilet paper, paper towel and pasta as a police officer watches on at Coles Supermarket, Epping in Sydney)

NSW Police Commissioner Mick Fuller said police would no longer issue cautions for those flouting self-isolation rules – instead $1000 on-the-spot fines would be handed out.

Police could also arrest and charge those repeatedly ignoring health orders, with a maximum penalty of six months in prison.

A Sydney man is already behind bars for allegedly ignoring his home self-quarantine twice on Saturday before trying to leave the serviced apartment in which he had been confined.

The number of confirmed NSW coronavirus cases on Monday rose to 1918, an increase of 127 on the previous day.

Twenty-six NSW coronavirus patients are in intensive care.

New South Wales has some of the toughest penalties, with anyone caught flouting the rules risking a fine up to $11,000 or six months in jail (Pictured: People socialising at a park)

New South Wales has some of the toughest penalties, with anyone caught flouting the rules risking a fine up to $11,000 or six months in jail (Pictured: People socialising at a park)

New South Wales has some of the toughest penalties, with anyone caught flouting the rules risking a fine up to $11,000 or six months in jail (Pictured: People socialising at a park)

Tougher social distancing rules have been introduced to stop people from congregating in groups during the coronavirus pandemic (Pictured: People at Bondi Beach in mid-March)

Tougher social distancing rules have been introduced to stop people from congregating in groups during the coronavirus pandemic (Pictured: People at Bondi Beach in mid-March)

Tougher social distancing rules have been introduced to stop people from congregating in groups during the coronavirus pandemic (Pictured: People at Bondi Beach in mid-March)

What are the rules in other states?

Victoria 

People who fail to follow social-distancing rules can be fined $1,652, while businesses can be fined $9,913.

Penalty for breaching quarantine is up to $19,826 for individuals and $100,000. 

Queensland 

Police can issue fines on the spot of $1,334 for individuals and $6,672 for businesses who break social-distancing rules.

Penalties of up to $13,345 apply for people breaking quarantine while corporations can be fined $66,672.

Western Australia

Disobeying social-distancing rules will result in a $1,000 fine while businesses can be fined $5,000.

Breaking quarantine can result in a $50,000 fine or a year behind bars.

Northern Territory

Breaking quarantine rules can result in a fine of up to $62,000.

South Australia

Flouting social distancing rules could result in a $1,000 fine, $5,000 for businesses.

Breaking quarantine can result in fines of $25,000.

Tasmania

Ignoring social-distancing rules can lead to fines of $1,000 and arrest.

Breaking quarantine could cause a $16,800 fine and up to six months in jail.

Australian Capital Territory

Fines can be given out for breaking social-distancing rules and breaking quarantine can result in fines of up to $8,000 for people, $40,500 for corporations. 

The number of confirmed NSW cases from the Ruby Princess cruise ship, meanwhile, jumped to 189 on Monday, including three seriously ill crew members who were evacuated from the ship to a Sydney hospital.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the states ‘aren’t mucking around’ when it comes to enforcing the new rules.

‘They’re very, very serious. And states like New South Wales and Victoria will move further down onto those two person rules, is my understanding,’ he said.

‘But states and territories will make their own announcements about those issues.’

The two-person limit doesn’t apply to workplaces, offices, schools and households.

It applies to all indoor settings, including private properties and homes.

People who live alone can only invite one friend over, while households of two people or more can’t have any visitors.

A family split across two houses can meet in private, allowing people to visit their partner, siblings or parents.

The prime minister urged all Australians to only leave their homes to buy essential supplies, to exercise, to attend personal medical appointments and to go to work or school – if unable to work or obtain an education from home.

‘Every single Australian needs to take this seriously or community transmission could get out of control and we could have a situation as terrible as even they are seeing in the US at the moment,’ he said.

Mr Morrison also strongly advised that anyone over 70 stay home for their own safety, except for going for a daily walk in the fresh air.

‘States and territories will term whether they proceed to make this an enforceable limit in the same way that the 10-person limit is already been enforced,’ he said.

Mr Morrison made it clear the advice about gatherings of more than two people was for all circumstances, not just for social occasions in homes.

‘That provides, importantly, for those who may be getting daily exercise, particularly for women, that they wouldn’t be required to walk on their own and they be able to be walk with another person,’ he said.

THE 16 EXCUSES FOR LEAVING YOUR HOME IN NSW:

  • Obtaining food or other goods or services for the personal needs of the household or other household purposes (including for pets) and for vulnerable persons
  • Travelling for the purposes of work if the person cannot work from the person’s place of residence 
  • Travelling for the purposes of attending childcare (including picking up or dropping another person at childcare) 
  • Travelling for the purposes of facilitating attendance at a school or other educational institution if the person attending the school or institution cannot learn from the person’s place of residence 
  • Exercising 
  • Obtaining medical care or supplies or health supplies or fulfilling carer’s responsibilities 
  • Attending a wedding or a funeral in the circumstances 
  • Moving to a new place of residence (including a business moving to new premises) or between different places of residence of the person or inspecting a potential new place of residence 
  • Providing care or assistance (including personal care) to a vulnerable person or providing emergency assistance 
  • Donating blood 
  • Undertaking any legal obligations 
  • Accessing public services (such as a hospital, Centrelink, a police station or a domestic violence service) 
  • For children who do not live in the same household as their parents or siblings or one of their parents or siblings—continuing existing arrangements for access to, and contact between, parents and children or siblings 
  • For a person who is a priest, minister of religion or member of a religious order— going to the person’s place of worship or providing pastoral care to another person 
  • Avoiding injury or illness or to escape a risk of harm 
  • For emergencies or compassionate reasons 

 

 

 

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Fans Think Hannah Is Sleeping in Tyler’s Bed as He Dodges Romance Questions

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Hannah Brown and Tyler Cameron may not be openly discussing their rumored romance, but they aren’t exactly denying their relationship either.

The Bachelorette season 15 couple fueled speculation into their relationship as they argued about washing the sheets on Cameron’s bed more frequently in a new TikTok. In another post on the social media platform, Brown, 25, can be seen lounging on the same bed, prompting fans to think she is sleeping in his room as they self-quarantine together with friends in Florida amid the coronavirus pandemic. In a third TikTok, Cameron, 27, seemingly shades Peter Weber during a pillow fight with Brown.

Fans Are Convinced Hannah Brown Is Sleeping in Tyler Camerons Bed
Hannah Brown and Tyler Cameron. Courtesy Matt James/TikTok (2)

“Better than Pete’s pillow fights,” the general contractor seemingly says while getting playful with the former pageant queen in bed.

Their most recent TikToks come after Cameron dodged questions about their relationship via Instagram Live. During a stream on Friday, March 27, he replied when a fan asked if he was dating Brown.

“Me and Brown Bear are dating, yes, I confirm,” he replied, referring to his friend Jacob Laham’s nickname.

The following day, another user had the same inquiry. This time, Cameron changed the question.

“Are Matt and Hannah dating? Yes,” he quipped, referencing his friend Matt James.

Brown and Cameron first called it quits when she sent him packing during the season 15 finale of The Bachelorette. Days after the episode aired in July 2019, the model was spotted leaving the former Miss Alabama Los Angeles apartment. Brown and Cameron joked about the infamous photos from their August 2019 overnight date during another Instagram Live on Monday, March 30.

The twosome went their separate ways for the second time that month as Cameron moved to New York City and was briefly linked to Gigi Hadid. After months of claiming they were just friends, Brown traveled to Florida to support Cameron after his mother died on February 29. She returned to self-quarantine with Cameron and his friends in his hometown on March 7.

Tyler and Hannah are very much aware of the attention that’s been on them recently,” a source told Us Weekly earlier this month. “They have a lot of love for each other. It’s been a hectic year for them both and they finally found some time in their schedules to connect.”

Listen on Spotify to Here For the Right Reasons to get inside scoop about the Bachelor franchise and exclusive interviews from contestants. Source: US Magazine

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What to Watch This Week While Social Distancing

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Grab your remote! While everyone has been instructed to practice social distancing due to the coronavirus pandemic, it’s the perfect time to catch up on the shows you might be missing out on.

The TV industry has definitely taken a hit from the virus. More than 140 shows have stopped production, late-night and daytime talk shows have begun broadcasting without studio audiences, and on March 16, the Today show had to switch things up just hours before going on live TV.

“Last night we learned that a colleague of ours on the third hour of Today has tested positive for COVID-19,” cohost Savannah Guthrie said during the broadcast, live from New York City. “So out of an abundance of caution, Craig [Melvin] and Al [Roker] have taken the morning off, so we can trace their contacts, see what is going on with them. We promise to keep you posted. Both are fine right now, they feel good, but caution is the order of the day.”

Though many shows have paused production in the middle of seasons, many pilots have been put on hold before even getting started. Season 16 of The Bachelorette was halted, as it was supposed to start filming on March 13.

“Talk about most dramatic season ever!” this season’s lead, Clare Crawley, wrote on Instagram following the news. “In all seriousness, Everyone’s health is the most important priority at this time, and as I’m sure you’ve heard, we are pressing pause for now on filming The Bachelorette. We are taking it day by day and even hour by hour as this is so unpredictable. All I know for sure is that my heart is so full from all the love and support this far, and am still so excited for my journey to begin! I’ve waited 38 years for these moments, what’s a little bit longer, right! xoxo.”

Movie theaters have also taken a massive hit since the virus began as the release dates for Mulan, The Quiet Place II and others were pushed to later this year. Multiple theaters have closed since the news to prevent their staffs from being infected.

That said, TV still has a lot to offer. With more streaming services than ever before, and with many network programs ramping up their seasons, we’re breaking down what to watch.

Source: US Magazine

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